A Design Process: one of infinite ways to design<br />
Step 1: Goals Articulation<br />“Goals help us integrate the various elements that will serve our needs, and they also hel...
Goals Articulation<br />As a designer, you are serving in the role of “midwife.”<br />You are supporting your clients (fri...
Guidelines for Goals Articulation<br />The difference between articulating vs. setting goals is the belief that our goals ...
Guidelines for Goals Articulation<br />State goals in PRESENT TENSE ACTIVE VOICE (PTAV), as if the condition already exist...
Goals Articulation Example: Urban Permaculture DesignAustin, TX<br />An edible landscape feeds the family.<br />Wildlife a...
Step 2: Site Analysis & Assessment<br />Observe and record the existing conditions of a site without judgment or jumping t...
Base Map<br />The first step to inventorying existing conditions is the creation of a base map.<br />You can make observat...
Creating a Base Map<br />
Contour Lines: Landform/Slope<br />
Aerial Photographs<br />
BASE MAP: <br /><ul><li> Property Boundary
 Building Footprint
 Existing Hardscape
 Significant Trees & Plants</li></ul>TITLE BLOCK:<br /><ul><li> North Arrow
 Scale
 Site Location
 Your Name</li></ul> Example Base Map<br />
NORTH ARROW<br />BUILDING FOOTPRINT<br />DRIVEWAY/HARDSCAPE<br />PATH/HARDSCAPE<br />VEGETATION/TREES<br />PROPERTY BOUNDA...
Context is important to consider—although not on this map, key elements to consider in this design:<br /><ul><li> Climate:...
 1-acre urban lot abutting a public park with stream corridor
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Design Process

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Design Process

  1. 1. A Design Process: one of infinite ways to design<br />
  2. 2. Step 1: Goals Articulation<br />“Goals help us integrate the various elements that will serve our needs, and they also help guide our decision-making. They speed up the process of design and implementation, help ensure details are thoroughly researched, help to re­orient us when suffering from ‘designer’s block’, prevent wasted effort and sharpen our focus in observing our site.” <br /> -Jacke & Toensmeier<br />(Taken from: Edible Forest Gardens volume 2) <br />
  3. 3. Goals Articulation<br />As a designer, you are serving in the role of “midwife.”<br />You are supporting your clients (friends, family, professional, etc.) to articulate their goals and realize what they truly want from their lives<br />Sometimes clients will be fixated on one solution or element—the proverbial “red gazebo.” They believe this “red gazebo” is the solution.<br />Your job is to remain objective and hold the possibility of multiple solutions. In this way, you can help guide your clients to gain a wider perspective.<br />
  4. 4. Guidelines for Goals Articulation<br />The difference between articulating vs. setting goals is the belief that our goals are already within each of us—and the act of articulating them is a means to unearth the function of our root needs behind the form<br />Setting goals, on the other hand, implies we are striving to achieve something foreign, future-based, and outside of ourselves. <br />
  5. 5. Guidelines for Goals Articulation<br />State goals in PRESENT TENSE ACTIVE VOICE (PTAV), as if the condition already exists. For instance, <br />“The orchard on the south-facing hill provides our family with delicious fruit while helping to prevent erosion.”<br />When goals are set in the future…condition X will happen…the actualization of the goal sounds as if it is a dream, one which may never be realized.<br />Writing in the passive voice sounds weak and the visionary power behind the goal is compromised<br />
  6. 6. Goals Articulation Example: Urban Permaculture DesignAustin, TX<br />An edible landscape feeds the family.<br />Wildlife are invited through a habitat that offers food, shelter, and water to animals.<br />The landscape exhibits year-round interest through native, ornamental plantings.<br />Water is sustainably managed and celebrated as a resource, while mitigating erosion.<br />
  7. 7. Step 2: Site Analysis & Assessment<br />Observe and record the existing conditions of a site without judgment or jumping to a design solution.<br />The elements you record should be relevant to the goals. <br />Then, analyze the existing conditions. <br />What are your interpretations of what you have observed—positive or negative?<br />
  8. 8. Base Map<br />The first step to inventorying existing conditions is the creation of a base map.<br />You can make observations from the base map directly (a simple approach). <br />Or you can use the base map as your bottom layer, and stack overlays of different factors affecting the site on top of it.<br />On each overlay (e.g. drainage patterns, vegetation etc.), make a set of observations (with a dot) and interpretations (with an arrow)<br />
  9. 9. Creating a Base Map<br />
  10. 10. Contour Lines: Landform/Slope<br />
  11. 11. Aerial Photographs<br />
  12. 12. BASE MAP: <br /><ul><li> Property Boundary
  13. 13. Building Footprint
  14. 14. Existing Hardscape
  15. 15. Significant Trees & Plants</li></ul>TITLE BLOCK:<br /><ul><li> North Arrow
  16. 16. Scale
  17. 17. Site Location
  18. 18. Your Name</li></ul> Example Base Map<br />
  19. 19. NORTH ARROW<br />BUILDING FOOTPRINT<br />DRIVEWAY/HARDSCAPE<br />PATH/HARDSCAPE<br />VEGETATION/TREES<br />PROPERTY BOUNDARY<br />TITLE BLOCK<br />SCALE<br />
  20. 20. Context is important to consider—although not on this map, key elements to consider in this design:<br /><ul><li> Climate: humid, hot, central Texas, with short, temperate winter
  21. 21. 1-acre urban lot abutting a public park with stream corridor
  22. 22. On the corner of a busy intersection: cars, cyclists, and pedestrians
  23. 23. Two elementary-age children live here</li></ul>Context Observations<br />
  24. 24. <ul><li> Slopes
  25. 25. Land Use
  26. 26. Impervious Surfaces</li></ul>Summary Analysis <br /><ul><li> Hydrology
  27. 27. Soils
  28. 28. Transportation
  29. 29. Conservation Areas
  30. 30. Farmland</li></ul>Map Overlay Analysis: taken from Feed Northampton: First steps Towards a Local Food System<br />
  31. 31. SCALES OF PERMANENCE:<br /><ul><li> Wind Direction
  32. 32. Sun & Shade
  33. 33. Drainage Patterns
  34. 34. Landform/Slope
  35. 35. Views
  36. 36. Flows: Sound/</li></ul> Light/Erosion<br /><ul><li> Vegetation
  37. 37. Access & Circulation</li></ul>Summary Analysis<br />TEXT:<br /><ul><li> Observations
  38. 38. Implications
  39. 39. Design Directions</li></li></ul><li>Step 3: Design <br />Design is a result of integrating:<br />Step 1: Goals Articulation<br /> +<br />Step 2: Site Analysis and Assessment<br />Ideally, all design decisions are informed by the client’s goals and conditions of the site<br />
  40. 40. <ul><li> Include Elements that address Goals
  41. 41. Arrange Elements using Permaculture Principles
  42. 42. Maximize on Beneficial Relationships
  43. 43. Graphics are Simplified and Sketchy
  44. 44. Key spatial relationships are explored
  45. 45. Good stage for a Reality Check</li></ul>Design: Bubble Diagram<br />
  46. 46. <ul><li> Plant Species & Quantities
  47. 47. Illustrative Graphics
  48. 48. Color Rendered
  49. 49. To Scale
  50. 50. Make it your own Style!</li></ul>TEXT<br /><ul><li> Summary of Main Points
  51. 51. Pros
  52. 52. Cons</li></ul>Final Design<br />
  53. 53. Step 4: ImplementationStep 5: Evaluation<br />Implementation takes the ideas on paper and puts them to test on the site. For instance, installing a garden or a water feature.<br />Evaluation compares the design with the original goals of the project and evaluates how well the design is achieving those goals.<br />
  54. 54. GADIE<br />G: Goals Articulation<br />A: Analysis & Assessment<br />D: Design<br />I: Implementation<br />E: Evaluation<br />

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