Recommendation reports     address four kinds of questions:• What should we do about Problem X?• Should we do Function X?•...
Feasibility reports    answer three kinds of questions:• questions of possibility• questions of economic wisdom• questions...
Use a problem-solving methodwhen preparing a recommendation report: • Identify the problem or opportunity. • Establish cri...
Use logic boxes to plot a series of options:    Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports   © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins...
Use a matrix to                     compare and contrast options: Criteria and Weight                                     ...
Explain your decision matrix:• Explain why you chose each criterion—or didn’t  choose a criterion readers might have expec...
You can present your    conclusions in one of three ways:• Rank all the options.• Classify all the options in two categori...
Most recommendation reports        have three major sections:• the body of the report• the front matter• the back matter  ...
A typical recommendation report          has five body elements:•   introduction•   methods•   results•   conclusions•   r...
An introduction typically                answers nine questions:•   What is the subject of the report?•   What is the purp...
An introduction typically       answers nine questions (cont.):•   What are the most significant findings?•   What are you...
Address the following four questions      when writing the body of your report:•   Methods. What did you do?•   Results. W...
Consider these four factors    when writing your recommendations:•   content•   tone•   form•   location      Chapter 19. ...
A typical recommendation reportcontains seven elements in the front matter: •   letter of transmittal •   cover •   title ...
Understand the difference betweena descriptive and an informative abstract:• A descriptive abstract describes the kinds of...
Follow these five guidelines  when writing an executive summary:• Use specific evidence in describing the  background.• Be...
A typical recommendation reportincludes three elements in the back matter: • glossary and list of symbols • references • a...
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Ch19 slides

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Prof. Wozencraft
ENG227

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Ch19 slides

  1. 1. Recommendation reports address four kinds of questions:• What should we do about Problem X?• Should we do Function X?• Should we use Technology A or Technology B to do Function X?• We currently use Method A to do Function X. Should we be using Method B? Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 1
  2. 2. Feasibility reports answer three kinds of questions:• questions of possibility• questions of economic wisdom• questions of perception Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 2
  3. 3. Use a problem-solving methodwhen preparing a recommendation report: • Identify the problem or opportunity. • Establish criteria for responding to the problem or opportunity. • Determine the options. • Study each option according to the criteria. • Draw conclusions about each option. • Formulate recommendations based on the conclusions. Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 3
  4. 4. Use logic boxes to plot a series of options: Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 4
  5. 5. Use a matrix to compare and contrast options: Criteria and Weight Options  Ricoh Xerox SharpCriterion Weight Rating Score(1) Rating Score(1) Rating Score(1)Pages/min. 1 9 9 6 6 3 3Duplex 3 1 3 3 9 10 30Color 4 10 40 1 4 10 40 Total Score 52 19 73(1) Score = Weight x Rating Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 5
  6. 6. Explain your decision matrix:• Explain why you chose each criterion—or didn’t choose a criterion readers might have expected.• Explain why you assigned a particular weight to each criterion.• Explain why you assigned a particular rating to each option. Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 6
  7. 7. You can present your conclusions in one of three ways:• Rank all the options.• Classify all the options in two categories: acceptable and unacceptable.• Present a compound conclusion. Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 7
  8. 8. Most recommendation reports have three major sections:• the body of the report• the front matter• the back matter Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 8
  9. 9. A typical recommendation report has five body elements:• introduction• methods• results• conclusions• recommendations Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 9
  10. 10. An introduction typically answers nine questions:• What is the subject of the report?• What is the purpose of the report?• What is the background of the report?• What are your sources of information?• What is the scope of the report? Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 10
  11. 11. An introduction typically answers nine questions (cont.):• What are the most significant findings?• What are your recommendations?• What is the organization of the report?• What key terms are you using in the report? Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 11
  12. 12. Address the following four questions when writing the body of your report:• Methods. What did you do?• Results. What did you see?• Conclusions. What does it mean?• Recommendations. What should we do? Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 12
  13. 13. Consider these four factors when writing your recommendations:• content• tone• form• location Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 13
  14. 14. A typical recommendation reportcontains seven elements in the front matter: • letter of transmittal • cover • title page • abstract • table of contents • list of illustrations • executive summary Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 14
  15. 15. Understand the difference betweena descriptive and an informative abstract:• A descriptive abstract describes the kinds of information contained in the report.• An informative abstract presents the major findings. Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 15
  16. 16. Follow these five guidelines when writing an executive summary:• Use specific evidence in describing the background.• Be specific in describing the research.• Describe the methods briefly.• Describe the findings according to your readers’ needs.• Ask an outside reader to review your draft. Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 16
  17. 17. A typical recommendation reportincludes three elements in the back matter: • glossary and list of symbols • references • appendixes Chapter 19. Writing Recommendation Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 17
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