Ch14 slides

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Prof. Wozencraft
ENG227

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Ch14 slides

  1. 1. The process of writing correspondence includes eight steps:• Analyze your audience.• Analyze your purpose.• Gather information about your subject.• Choose a type of correspondence.• Draft the correspondence.• Format the correspondence.• Revise, edit, and proofread the correspondence.• Send the correspondence. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 1 Martins
  2. 2. Select the appropriate application:• Letters are the most formal and most appropriate for communicating with people outside your organization.• Memos are moderately formal and appropriate for people in your organization.• E-mail is best for quick, relatively informal communication.• Microblog posts (Twitter tweets, Facebook status updates) can be useful for informal questions or statements addressed to a group. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 2 Martins
  3. 3. Use these five principles to present yourself effectively:• Use the appropriate level of formality.• Communicate correctly.• Project the “you attitude.”• Avoid correspondence clichés.• Communicate honestly. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 3 Martins
  4. 4. Most letters include six elements:• heading• inside address• salutation• body• complimentary close• signature Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 4 Martins
  5. 5. Some letters include additional elements:• attention line• subject line• header for second and subsequent pages• enclosure line• copy line Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 5 Martins
  6. 6. Most letters use one of two formats:• modified block• full block Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 6 Martins
  7. 7. Four types of letters are common:• inquiry• response to inquiry• claim• adjustment Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 7 Martins
  8. 8. Use this strategy when writing an inquiry letter:• Explain who you are and why you are writing.• Make your questions precise and clear.• Indicate your schedule.• Politely request a response.• Offer something in return.• Always write a thank-you note to the person who has responded to your inquiry letter. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 8 Martins
  9. 9. Use this strategy when responding to an inquiry letter:• Answer the questions if you can.• If you cannot answer the questions, explain the reasons and offer to assist with other requests.• Include additional information, if appropriate. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 9 Martins
  10. 10. Use this strategy when writing a claim letter:• Use a professional tone.• Clearly identify the product or service you are writing about.• Explain the problem and include persuasive details.• Propose a solution. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 10 Martins
  11. 11. Use this strategy when writing a bad-news adjustment letter:• Meet the customer on neutral ground.• Summarize the facts as you see them.• Explain why you are unable to fulfill the request.• Create goodwill. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 11 Martins
  12. 12. Use these five elements to organize most memos:• a specific subject line• a clear statement of purpose• a brief summary• informative headings• a prominent recommendation Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 12 Martins
  13. 13. Follow these eight netiquette guidelines when writing e-mail:• Stick to business.• Don’t waste bandwidth.• Use appropriate formality.• Write correctly.• Don’t flame. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 13 Martins
  14. 14. Follow these eight netiquette guidelines when writing e-mail (cont.):• Make your message easy on the eyes.• Don’t forward a message to an online discussion forum without the writer’s permission.• Don’t send a message unless you have something to say. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 14 Martins
  15. 15. Remember three things when writing microblogs:• You are creating an archived communication that reflects on you and your organization.• Anything you write is subject to the same laws and regulations that pertain to all other kinds of documents.• The best way to understand your responsibilities is to study your organization’s guidelines. Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 15
  16. 16. Consider three factors when writing to intercultural readers:• the cultural practices of your readers• the language use and tone preferred by your readers• the application choice and use preferred by your readers Chapter 14. Writing Correspondence © 2012 by Bedford/St. 16 Martins

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