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Ch13 slides

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Prof. Wozencraft …

Prof. Wozencraft
ENG227

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • 1. Usability refers to five factors of use:• ease of learning• efficiency of use• memorability• error frequency, severity, and recovery• subjective satisfaction Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 1
  • 2. What are reviewing, evaluating, and testing?• Reviewing refers to three techniques—revising, editing, and proofreading—that you can use to study your draft and change it to make it easier to use.• Evaluating refers to having other people help you by reading the draft and commenting on its strengths and weaknesses.• Testing refers to formal techniques of observing people and analyzing their actions as they try to use your draft to carry out tasks. Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 2
  • 3. Understand the relationships among reviewing, evaluating, and testing: Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 3
  • 4. Consider three factors when deciding whether to evaluate or test:• the importance of the document or site• your time• your money Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 4
  • 5. Ask these four questions to get the “big picture” before editing your draft:• Is the design effective?• Does my draft meet my readers’ expectations?• Is my draft honest, and does it adhere to appropriate legal standards?• Do I come across as reliable, honest, and helpful? Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 5
  • 6. Ask these four questions about organization and development when editing your draft:• Have I left out anything in turning my outline into a draft?• Is the organization logical?• Is the emphasis appropriate throughout the draft?• Are my arguments well developed? Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 6
  • 7. Ask these four questions about the verbal and visual elements of your draft:• Are all the elements presented consistently?• Are my paragraphs well developed?• Are my sentences clear, emphatic, and correct?• Have I used graphics appropriately? Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 7
  • 8. There are five types of usability evaluations:• surveying or interviewing users• observing users• interviewing SMEs and usability experts• conducting focus groups• using a commercial usability service Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 8
  • 9. Usability testing rests on three principles:• Usability testing permeates product development.• Usability testing involves studying real users as they use the product.• Usability testing involves setting measurable goals and determining whether the product meets them. Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 9
  • 10. Usability testing occurs in three stages:• preparing for the usability test• conducting the usability test• interpreting and reporting the data from a usability test Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 10
  • 11. Preparing for a usability test requires eight steps:1. Understand users’ needs.2. Determine the purpose of the test.3. Staff the test team.4. Set up the test environment.5. Develop a test plan.6. Select participants.7. Prepare the test materials.8. Conduct a pilot test. Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 11
  • 12. A typical usability testing lab Source: Xperience Consulting, 2008 <www.xperienceconsulting.com/eng/serviceios.asp?ap=25#3>.Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 12
  • 13. Obtain informed consent for tests that involve recording:• Explain that the test participant can stop the test.• Ask for permission before recording begins.• Explain how the recording will be used.• Explain who will have access to the recording and where it might be shown.• Explain how the test participant’s identity will be disguised—if at all—if the recording is shown publicly.• Let the test participant view the recording and change his or her mind about how it might be used. Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 13
  • 14. Conducting a usability test involves two tasks:• interacting with the test participant during the test• debriefing the test participant after the test Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 14
  • 15. Interpreting and reporting the datafrom a usability test requires three steps:• tabulating the information• analyzing the information• reporting the information Chapter 13. Reviewing, Evaluating, and Testing © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 15

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