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Prof. Wozencraft …

Prof. Wozencraft
ENG227

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  • 1. You can collaborate with others in three basic ways:• collaborating face to face• collaborating electronically• collaborating with a combination of face-to-face meetings and electronic tools Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 1
  • 2. Collaboration has six advantages:• It draws on a greater knowledge base.• It draws on a greater skills base.• It provides a better idea of how the audience will read the document.• It improves communication among employees.• It helps acclimate new employees to an organization.• It motivates employees to help an organization grow. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 2
  • 3. Collaboration has six disadvantages:• It takes more time than individual writing.• It can lead to groupthink.• It can yield a disjointed document.• It can lead to inequitable workloads.• It can reduce a person’s motivation to work hard on the document.• It can lead to interpersonal conflict. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 3
  • 4. Follow these seven suggestions for managing your projects:• Break down a large project into several smaller tasks.• Plan your project.• Create and maintain an accurate schedule.• Put your decisions in writing.• Monitor the project.• Distribute and act on information quickly.• Be flexible regarding schedule and responsibilities. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 4
  • 5. Conducting meetings involves five skills:• listening effectively• setting your team’s agenda• conducting efficient meetings• communicating diplomatically• critiquing a team members work Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 5
  • 6. Follow these five steps to improve your effectiveness as a listener:• Pay attention to the speaker.• Listen for main ideas.• Don’t get emotionally involved with the speakers ideas.• Ask questions to clarify what the speaker said.• Provide appropriate feedback. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 6
  • 7. There are eight steps in setting your teams agenda:• Define the team’s task.• Choose a team leader.• Define tasks for each team member.• Establish working procedures. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 7
  • 8. There are eight steps in setting your agenda (cont.):• Establish a procedure for resolving conflict productively.• Create a style sheet.• Establish a work schedule.• Create evaluation materials. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins
  • 9. Communicating diplomatically requires seven skills:• Listen carefully, without interrupting.• Give everyone a chance to speak.• Avoid personal remarks and insults.• Don’t overstate your position.• Don’t get emotionally attached to your own ideas.• Ask pertinent questions.• Pay attention to nonverbal communication. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 9
  • 10. Critiquing a group member’s work involves three steps:• Start with a positive comment.• Discuss the larger issues first.• Talk about the document, not the writer. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 10
  • 11. Critique a draft clearly and diplomatically. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 11
  • 12. Three powerful word-processor features can be useful in collaborative work:• the comment feature• the revision feature• the highlighting feature Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 12
  • 13. Electronic media are useful collaborative tools for three reasons:• Face-to-face meetings are not always possible or convenient.• Organizations can benefit when more people can participate and share their ideas.• Electronic communication is convenient and often instantaneous. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 13
  • 14. Besides a word processor, there are four main types of collaboration technologies:• Messaging technologies• Videoconferencing• Wikis and shared document workspaces• Virtual worlds Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 14
  • 15. Follow these six suggestions for conducting effective videoconferences:•Practice using videoconferencing technology.•Arrange for technical support at each site.•Organize the room to encourage participation.•Make eye contact with the camera.•Dress as you would for a face-to-face meeting.•Minimize distracting noises and movements. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 15
  • 16. If you use social media, maintain a professional online presence:• Don’t use it for nonbusiness purposes.• Don’t divulge secure information.• Don’t divulge private information about anyone.• Don’t make racist or sexist comments or post pictures of people drinking. Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 16
  • 17. When collaborating across cultures,consider that people from other cultures:• might find it difficult to assert themselves in collaborative teams• might be unwilling to respond with a definite “no”• might be reluctant to admit when they are confused or to ask for clarification• might avoid criticizing others• might avoid initiating new tasks or performing creatively Chapter 4. Writing Collaboratively © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 17

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