Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Group communication
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Group communication

542

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
542
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Group Communication©www.sti-innsbruck.at INNSBRUCK www.sti-innsbruck.at Copyright 2008 STI
  • 2. Why use group communication?www.sti-innsbruck.at 2
  • 3. www.sti-innsbruck.at 3
  • 4.  Not a common forum software  It is more a product able to manage a community using different tools  Includes an archive of Usenet news group postings dating back t o 1981  Strongly focuses on the concept of mailing list - Can have parallel mailing lists (can use Google groups to archive another mailing list, such as Yahoo Groups)  Need a Google account to access groups or post messages;  Types: groups created with  Google Apps: can create up to 10 groups  Google Apps for Business and Education: can create an unlimited number of groupswww.sti-innsbruck.at 4
  • 5.  What can be shared: there’s a limit of 25MB including attachments/ group  Users by role:  Owner: creates the group, deletes it, manages settings and appoints new managers or co-owners. Only the owner can appoint a new co-owner or transfer ownership.  Manager: moderates discussions  Participant: subscribe to group and participate in group discussions  Users by membership:  Direct: user is a direct member of a group if his or her address was added directly to the members list (can be a direct member of up to 2000 groups)  Indirect: that is, an owner of a group or a member of a group thats nested within another group  A users total group memberships -- both direct and indirect combined -- can be up to 5000  Joining a group: Invitation or request. Owners can make an opt-out issue by inviting members directly through their email addreswww.sti-innsbruck.at 5
  • 6.  Notifications:  No email: read group postings only online  Abridged Email: one summary email of new activity/day  Digest Email: get up to 25 full messages in a single email  Email: send each message to me as it arrives  Noise: the level of noise is dependent on the managers; discussion groups can be  Un-moderated – anyone can post  Moderated – submissions are automatically directed to moderator, who edits and filters out inappropriate and irrelevant materialwww.sti-innsbruck.at 6
  • 7. Email masking to prevent email harvesting”  replaces up to the last three characters of the user name with three dots  To view email you have to pass a CAPCHA challenge  Masked only in the web interface, not when receiving an email notification  Users cannot obfuscate their own email addresses  Fully integrated with Google products : Google Calendars, Google Docs, Google Sites  Can be accessed using smart phones  Rate posts and threads using a 5 star system (up to 200 individual threads can be tracked centrally)  Subscription (email) to topics that I post to  Can create events with up to 500 invites (or workarounds for more)  Link to public Google profilewww.sti-innsbruck.at 7
  • 8. Circleswww.sti-innsbruck.at 8
  • 9. Circles  Google+ Circles helps you organize everyone according to your real-life social connections.  This allows users to share information and restrict the sharing with a particular group  Anyone can add another person to one of their circles without confirmation. Does not work in reverse (the first person is not automatically added to the second person’s circles)  After adding a person to a circle, you don’t get additional access to their profile information  Who can see circles: People in a circle (but not the name of the circle); will appear to others on the owner’s Google Profile, unless he chooses not to display that information.  For enterprises: ease segmentation of your customers and manage of offers and promotionswww.sti-innsbruck.at 9
  • 10.  Yahoo! Groups is one of the world’s largest collections of online discussion boards.  Group messages can be read and posted by e-mail or on the Groups webpage like a web forum.  Members can choose whether to receive individual, daily digest or Special Delivery e-mails, or simply read Group posts on the Group’s web site  Groups can be created with public or member-only access.  Yahoo! Groups service provides additional facilities for each Group web site, such as a homepage, message archive, polls, calendar announcements, files, photos, database functions, and bookmarkswww.sti-innsbruck.at 10
  • 11.  Create a private space (group) to share  Post updates, questions, photos;  Chat with the group;  Create share docs  Schedule group events  Members can stay in touch using:  Notifications regarding new posts and updates  The group’s shared email address to connect off Facebookwww.sti-innsbruck.at 11
  • 12.  There are 3 levels of control on groups  Secret: group name cannot be found in searches; the name of the group will not be displayed on the member’s timeline/profiles; only members can see the group and what members post; to join, you need to be added by a member;  Closed: anyone can see the group name and members, but only members see posts; unless added to a group by a member, users need permission to join and become members when the request is approved;  Open (public): anyone can see the group and what members post; anyone can join; • Group chat is unavailable once a group has more than 250 members. • All members of the group can interact regardless of whether they are confirmed friends.www.sti-innsbruck.at 12
  • 13.  Members cannot see more information about a non-confirmed friend (the amount of information seen is determined by the member’s privacy settings);  All members of the group may view and edit documents;  A group is automatically deleted once it has no members.  All members of the group are invited at an event.www.sti-innsbruck.at 13
  • 14.  Facebook Groups function on the push-strategy (as opposed to pull-strategy): they can stay updated without having to physically visit the group page -> increases the vehicles for communication;  Admins:  Once you create a group, you automatically become an Admin  A group can have more than one admins:  By asking another admin to add you;  If the group has no Admin, a member can become one by clicking “Make me Admin”.  Admins can:  Edit group descriptions and settings;  Add more admins;  Remove abusive posts  Remove or ban memberswww.sti-innsbruck.at 14
  • 15.  Opt-out issue: similarly to Facebook Places and tags, friends can add other friends to the group without their permission (if you don’t want to join, you have to remove yourself from the group);  Note: Only friends can add you to a group, not a random stranger!  Once you have left a group, you cannot be added again unless you explicitly request to be added  Noise: members can get overwhelmed by the number of notifications. The only way to avoid or fully disengage from the chat is to change your chat status to “go offline”. Members can report/block other members.www.sti-innsbruck.at 15
  • 16.  Pages allow real organizations, businesses,  Groups provide a closed space for small groups of celebrities and brands to communicate broadly people to communicate about shared interests. with people who like them.  Groups can be created by anyone. Pages may only be created and managed by  Privacy: groups offer three levels of control over official representatives. shared information: open, closed and secret. In Privacy: information and posts are public and secret and closed groups, posts are only visible to generally available to everyone on Facebook. group members. Audience:  Audience:  Anyone can like a Page to become connected with it  Group members must be approved or added by other and get News Feed updates. members.  There is no limit to how many people can like a  When a group reaches a certain size, some features are Page. limited (e.g. chat).  Visitor statistics  The most useful groups tend to be the ones you create Communication: with small groups of people you know.  Page admins can share posts under the Page’s  Communication: name.  In groups, members receive notifications by default  Page posts appear in the News Feed of people who when any member posts in the group. like the Page.  Group members can participate in chats, upload photos  Page admins can also create customized apps for to shared albums, collaborate on group docs, and invite their Pages and check Page Insights to track the all members to group events. Page’s growth and activity. Groups: smaller number of people. Pages: large number of followers www.sti-innsbruck.at 16
  • 17.  Discover the most popular discussions.  Have an active part in determining the top discussions by liking and commenting.  Follow the most influential people in your groups by checking the Top Influencers board or clicking their profile image to see all their group activity.  Review new members or search for specific ones.  See both member-generated discussions and news in one setting.  Easily browse previews of the last three comments in a discussion.  Find interesting discussions by seeing who liked a discussion and how many people commented.www.sti-innsbruck.at 17
  • 18.  Allow LinkedIn members to discover, share and participate in a number of professional conversations happening in their industry and areas of interest.  Members can initiate and participate in discussions and share news articles, blogs, etc via weblinks (chat is similar to a forum/comment section).  All groups are members only – unless the group owner choses to enable public discussions  Note: the conversations that took place before the public status, remain locked for members only!  Members can join groups to:  Make connections (identify a member through the group he/she belongs to; email the member directly without connecting with him);  Become known;  To learn about trends.  You can belong to as many as 50 groups.  LinkedIn Groups offers email notifications.www.sti-innsbruck.at 18
  • 19.  Joining a group is done through group invitation: sending invitations to connections – those who accept become members  Managers and group moderators can:  Delete inappropriate posts, comments (only owner deletes group)  Flag inappropriate items  Create featured discussions – called “Manager’s choice” (to eliminate the confusion on who featured them – LinkedIn or the Managers)  Restrict the move-to-Jobs capability to themselves  Users can search groups by company name, industry or relevant keywords, as well as by browsing the Groups Directory by selecting from the “Categories” drop-down: Alumni, Corporate, Conference, Networking, Non-profit, and Professional.  LinkedIn offers means to measure the health of a group: Group Statistics which includes number of members, location, operations, demographicswww.sti-innsbruck.at 19
  • 20.  Social and business networking tool for professionals with over 8 million users;  Initially established as Open business Club AG in August 2003 in Germany; name was changed to Xing in November 2006  Main competitor is LinkedIn  Seems to attract more small business and independent business owners than its competitors  Basic membership is free  The platform uses https and has a rigid privacy and no-spam policy.www.sti-innsbruck.at 20
  • 21. www.sti-innsbruck.at 21
  • 22. www.sti-innsbruck.at 22
  • 23.  DO YOU MEET THE REQUIREMENTS TO CREATE A NEW GROUP?  Moderators have to follow a “Code of Conduct” and ensure that the group is active by ensuring the members participate, answering to all posts (or XING will replace the moderator or delete the group);  Xing recommends more than one moderator  Internal group members search HTML formatting in group pages + integrated external RSS feed  HTML newsletters to group members and XING Event Tool to invite people to events or seminars  Multi-language forums  Upload individual logoswww.sti-innsbruck.at 23
  • 24. Other options for group communication Tool Website Description Meetup www.meetup.com Meetup is an online social networking portal that facilitates offline group meetings in various localities around the world [Wiki]. GroupSpaces groupspaces.com GroupSpaces (styled groupspaces) is a London-based online company that provides technology to help real-world clubs, societies, associations and other groups manage their membership and activities, and promote themselves online [Wiki]. Windows Live groups.live.com Windows Live Groups is an online service by Microsoft as part of its Groups Windows Live range of services that enable users to create their social groups for sharing, discussion and coordination [Wiki].www.sti-innsbruck.at 24
  • 25. Comparison Group Communication Communication and content features Group Administration Communication Event Features Features Comparison Criterion Costwww.sti-innsbruck.at 25
  • 26. Communication and Content FeaturesCharacteristics Google Groups Yahoo Groups Facebook Groups LinkedIn Xing Groups GroupsForums Yes Yes Yes Yes YesChat Threaded Yes Yes (max 250 No No conversation members)Shared email Yes Yes Yes No NoUpload content (documents, Not part of Yes Yes Via weblinks Yesimages, videos) groups Google DocsMaximum Storage 25 MB posts and 200 MB Unlimited -- 2 MB attachmentsIntegrate external content Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes(RSS feeds)Notifications Customizable: no Email Email, FB Email, http email, abridged, notifications bundled newsletter digest, emailSearch features Google Search / Yahoo search, Not a separate Advanced - Advanced Directory Search separate group function (Facebook search for search classic search), group, clumsy and no member, group suggestion event www.sti-innsbruck.at 26
  • 27. Event FeaturesCharacteristics Google Groups Yahoo Groups Facebook LinkedIn Xing Groups Groups GroupsCreate/schedule Yes (using Google Yes Yes (Create Yes (Not a Yesevents Calendar) – members (using RSVP Group Event part of invited need to use Google Event Tool) Groups, but Calendar Application) a separate option on account)Invite members All members (up to 500 Yes (can track Everyone Yes Yes (can people) who is invited track who coming) is coming)Join events Public events or events Yes Join, Maybe or Yes, options Yes, can with invitation Decline are: Attend send mass options or follow invitesSearch events Public events or events Only within Yes Special Search for with invitation group event seminars, search trade fairs, cultural or networking eventswww.sti-innsbruck.at 27
  • 28. Administration FeaturesCharacteristics Google Groups Yahoo Groups Facebook LinkedIn Xing Groups Groups GroupsCreate group Owner Owner Admin Group Approval from manager XingDelete group Only owner Owner or Automatically Only owner Xing terminates moderator at 0 members itLevel of access Open, restricted and Private or open Secret > closed Private > open Control group private > open visibility Announcement onlyUser types Owner, manager Members and Admin, user Members and Moderator, co- (moderator), members moderators moderators moderator, userJoining options Invitation/request or Invitation / Opt-out Invitation or Invitation or direct invite request, add request request (opt-out illegal)Member lists Max 100 or unlimited No limit 300 50 Min 100 /group groups/userNoise Dependent manager Dependent Can be Dependent small moderator overwhelming moderator www.sti-innsbruck.at 28
  • 29. Costs Characteristics Basic access Plans Maximum Google Groups free - free Yahoo Groups Free - free Facebook Groups Free - free LinkedIn Groups Free Business: Annual: €14.95/month; €71.95 per month Monthly: €17.95/month Business Plus: Annual: €29.95/month; Monthly: €35.95/month Executive: Annual: €53.95/month; Monthly: €71.95/month Xing Groups free €6.35 per month (3-month) €6.35 per month €5.55 per month (12-month)www.sti-innsbruck.at 29
  • 30. Measuring Group Impact • Size (number of members) • Interconnectedness and network density • Shared Language • Communication activity • Noise level • Built-in methods of determining group health • Access levelwww.sti-innsbruck.at 30
  • 31. Size (Increase in Size)www.sti-innsbruck.at 31
  • 32. Interconnectedness and Network Densitywww.sti-innsbruck.at 32
  • 33. Shared Languagewww.sti-innsbruck.at 33
  • 34. Communication activity • Measure the number of message replies that the individual receives from other members of the group = the level of feedback from group members • Conversational thread length, which is calculated as the amount and length of message threads spurred by individuals = the amount of user engagement and depth in the communication • User rating of message replies and posts (if functionality is provided by the group provider) • Verity the types of messages received: are they seen as relevant, consistent and credible?www.sti-innsbruck.at 34
  • 35. Noisewww.sti-innsbruck.at 35
  • 36. Polls and surveys • Built-in poll feature (if provided) • Empirical tests to determine health: surveys, content analysis, observational studies, interviews, etc.www.sti-innsbruck.at 36
  • 37. Built-in Methods Characteristics Google Groups Yahoo Groups Facebook LinkedIn Xing Groups Groups Groups Show number of Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes members Show number of Yes (and the top Yes No Yes Yes posts posters) “Health” (activity) 5 star rating Internal, owner Like button Internal Internal measuring system (users) can add other on group mechanism mechanisms (e.g. page and “like” buttons on individual pictures); comments Management Features to track activity Polls No Yes Yes Yes Yes Group statistics No No No dashboard Yeswww.sti-innsbruck.at 37
  • 38. Built-in Methods - Examplewww.sti-innsbruck.at 38
  • 39. Secret vs. Private Google Groups, LinkedIn, Xing Facebook, Yahoo Groups (unlisted)www.sti-innsbruck.at 39
  • 40. References • L. Adamic, J. Zhang, E. Bakshy, and M. Ackerman, 2008. “Knowledge sharing and Yaho! Answers: Everyone knows something,” paper presented at the WWW ’08 (Beijing, China), at http://www2008.org/papers/fp840.html, accessed 28 March 2011. • B.S. Butler, 2001. “Membership size, communication activity, and sustainability: A resource–based model of online social structures,” Information Systems Research, volume 12, number 4, pp. 346– 362. • R. Grewal, G. Lilien, and G. Mallapragada, 2006. “Location, location, location: How network embeddedness affects project success in open source systems,” Management Science, volume 52, number 7, pp. 1043–1056. • Q. Jones, G. Ravid, and S. Rafaeli, 2004. “Information overload and the message dynamics of online interaction spaces: A theoretical model and empirical exploration,” Information Systems Research, volume 15, number 2, pp. 194–210. • R.E. Rice, 1987. “New patterns of social structure in an information society,” In: J.R. Schement and L.A. Lievrouw (editors). Competing visions, complex realities: Social aspects of the information society. Norwood, N.J.: Ablex, pp. 107–120.www.sti-innsbruck.at 40

×