Ch4ppt integument

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Ch4ppt integument

  1. 1. PowerPoint® Lecture Slide Presentation by Patty Bostwick-Taylor, Florence-Darlington Technical College Skin and Body Membranes 4 Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  2. 2. Integumentary System  Skin (cutaneous membrane)  Skin derivatives  Sweat glands  Oil glands  Hair  Nails Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  3. 3. Skin Functions Table 4.1 (1 of 2) Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  4. 4. Skin Functions Table 4.1 (2 of 2) Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  5. 5. Skin Structure  Epidermis—outer layer  Stratified squamous epithelium  Often keratinized (hardened by keratin)  Dermis  Dense connective tissue Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  6. 6. Skin Structure Figure 4.3 Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  7. 7. Skin Structure  Subcutaneous tissue (hypodermis) is deep to dermis  Not part of the skin  Anchors skin to underlying organs  Composed mostly of adipose tissue Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  8. 8. Normal Skin Color Determinants  Melanin  Yellow, brown, or black pigments  Carotene  Orange-yellow pigment from some vegetables  Hemoglobin  Red coloring from blood cells in dermal capillaries  Oxygen content determines the extent of red coloring Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  9. 9. Skin Appendages  Cutaneous glands are all exocrine glands  Sebaceous glands (oil glands)  Sweat glands  Hair  Arrector Pili Muscle (attaches to hair)  Nails Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  10. 10. Skin Structure Figure 4.4 Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  11. 11. Appendages of the Skin Figure 4.9 Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  12. 12. Skin Homeostatic Imbalances  Infections and allergies  Contact dermatitis  Exposures cause allergic reaction  Impetigo  Caused by bacterial infection  Psoriasis  Cause is unknown  Triggered by trauma, infection, stress Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  13. 13. Skin Homeostatic Imbalances Figure 4.10 Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  14. 14. Skin Homeostatic Imbalances  Burns  Tissue damage and cell death caused by heat, electricity, UV radiation, or chemicals  Associated dangers  Dehydration  Infection  Circulatory shock Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  15. 15. Severity of Burns  First-degree burns  Only epidermis is damaged  Skin is red and swollen  Second-degree burns  Epidermis and upper dermis are damaged  Skin is red with blisters  Third-degree burns  Destroys entire skin layer  Burn is gray-white or black Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  16. 16. Severity of Burns Figure 4.11b Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  17. 17. Critical Burns  Burns are considered critical if  Over 25% of body has second-degree burns  Over 10% of the body has third-degree burns  There are third-degree burns of the face, hands, or feet Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  18. 18. Skin Cancer  Cancer—abnormal cell mass  Classified two ways  Benign  Does not spread (encapsulated)  Malignant  Metastasized (moves) to other parts of the body  Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  19. 19. Skin Cancer Types  Basal cell carcinoma  Least malignant  Most common type  Arises from stratum basale Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  20. 20. Skin Cancer Types Figure 4.12a Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  21. 21. Skin Cancer Types  Squamous cell carcinoma  Metastasizes to lymph nodes if not removed  Early removal allows a good chance of cure  Believed to be sun-induced  Arises from stratum spinosum Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  22. 22. Skin Cancer Types Figure 4.12b Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  23. 23. Skin Cancer Types  Malignant melanoma  Most deadly of skin cancers  Cancer of melanocytes  Metastasizes rapidly to lymph and blood vessels Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings
  24. 24. Skin Cancer Types Figure 4.12c Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc., publishing as Benjamin Cummings

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