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Examples from Barnet, South Norwood and Surbiton

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The presentation presents three examples of the SSTC project's work on the suburbs of Barnet, South Norwood and Surbiton.

The presentation presents three examples of the SSTC project's work on the suburbs of Barnet, South Norwood and Surbiton.

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Towards Successful Suburban Town Centres Profiling London’s Suburbs – A detailed picture of Barnet
    • 2. Adaptable suburbs – four propositions
      • When a suburban centre has persisted over a long period of time a basic condition for sustainability has been met
      • Considering the relationship of morphological structure and movement patterns helps reveal where the potential for adaptability lies
      • Street level activity is a source of long-term adaptability
      • By working with the historical ‘grain’ of a settlement form particular policy agendas have more chance of being successfully and efficiently implemented
    • 3. Barnet early 1800s
    • 4. Continuity in form and function: Barnet – High Street http://www.francisfrith.com/barnet/photos/high-street-1940_B708016/ High Street 2008 High Street 1940
    • 5. Barnet: back street activity
    • 6. Local Opinion
      • “ .....There are some old industrial units behind the High Street. We’d like it to be mixed use. I don’t want it to compete with the High Street but it needs tidying up. I’m hoping for high quality housing or office suites, to complement what’s there at the moment. Now it’s all multiple ownership and sites are sitting there not doing anything - we need to bring them back into use. Residential area is quite tightly drawn around the parade - but what I’m talking about is this series of sites, kind of like a commercial backland, to the eastern side of the centre…”
      • (Barnet workshop participant December 2nd 2008)
    • 7. Persistence and change in areas of socio-economic and community activity
    • 8. Through-route accessibility at 5 mins walking distance
    • 9. Through-route accessibility at 10 mins walking distance
    • 10. Through-route accessibility for local car journey
    • 11. Through-route accessibility for Greater London area
    • 12. Town centre activity: movement traces all routes
    • 13. Town cdentre activity: tendency for circulatory movement at 10 minutes walking distance
    • 14. Adaptable Barnet?
      • The morphology of Barnet town centre suggests it has a high potential for adaptability.
      • The contemporary town centre is a composite of historically distinct regions including Chipping Barnet, Hadley Green, High Street and the area around the intersection of Wood St., Staypleton Rd and Union St.
      • At least three distinct layers of road network: the main grid, smaller roads and cul-de-sacs and pedestrian only paths combine to form an intelligible circulatory structure.
      • Accessible ‘backlands’ premises provide scope for small office developments, light industries servicing the town centre and diverse enterprises located in unremarkable vernacular buildings.
      • When it is open the Spires shopping centre blends in well with the existing morphology and provides a dynamic new axis for movement between the High Street and Staplyton Road where parking and buses are located.
      • High Street and Spires centre offer retail space at a range of different sizes for a combination of high street chains and niche local businesses.
    • 15. Adaptable Barnet?
      • Diverse land uses are organised across scales of vehicular and pedestrian movement.
      • At larger scales of movement, retail, service and office activity are organised on a linear pattern associated with regional transport routes.
      • At more local scales land-uses can be seen to cluster around the historical areas of activity – this is emphasised when community and industrial functions, with less need for high-movement locations, are taken into account.
      • Pedestrian movement takes advantage of multi-scaled structure
      • The pattern of growth of a centre strongly influences how it emerges as a focus of activity.
      • Morphology and land uses generate complex pedestrian movement patterns connecting discrete historical areas of activity.
      • Barnet’s unique blend of an integrated multi-scaled morphology, diverse land use and range of high quality buildings suggest it has a high potential to sustain itself as a centre of activity over time.
    • 16. Barnet 2008
    • 17. Towards Successful Suburban Town Centres Profiling London’s Suburbs – A detailed picture of South Norwood
    • 18. Adaptable suburbs – four propositions
      • When a suburban centre has persisted over a long period of time a basic condition for sustainability has been met
      • Considering the relationship of morphological structure and movement patterns helps reveal where the potential for adaptability lies
      • Street level activity is a source of long-term adaptability
      • By working with the historical ‘grain’ of a settlement form particular policy agendas have more chance of being successfully and efficiently implemented
    • 19. South Norwood area early 1800s
    • 20. South Norwood area late 1800s
    • 21. Continuity and change in form and function: Portland Road, South Norwood Early 1900s 2008
    • 22. South Norwood: Back street activity
    • 23. Local Opinion
      • “ You take away one element, like the old cinema in South Norwood which was removed in 1967 or 68, and the place crumbles. Because those are the elements that make up a community and you end up losing the heart of the community when they go...The basic elements, like cinemas and pubs got eroded, then there is the lost industry and dying commerce. This used to be classic Victorian suburb and used to have its own industry. You know, the Small Business Association used to have 600 members just in South Norwood 30 years ago, now there’s only 1300 in all of Croydon”
      • (workshop participant, October 13 th 2008)
    • 24. Persistence areas of socio-economic and cultural activity
    • 25. Through route accessibility at 5 minutes walking distance
    • 26. Through route accessibility at 10 minutes walking distance
    • 27. Through route accessibility for local car journey
    • 28. Through route accessibility Greater London Region
    • 29. Town centre activity: movement traces all routes
    • 30. Town centre activity: tendency for circulatory movement at 10 minutes walking distance
    • 31. Adaptable South Norwood?
      • The morphology of South Norwood centre suggests it could benefit from considerable investment in the station area to improve its adaptability.
      • The contemporary town centre is a relatively simple structure consisting of two busy roads - High Street and Portland Road - that intersect at a major cross roads
      • The railway line effectively bisects the centre into two different parts – though access is possible beneath the station this is inadequate
      • An isolated footpath connecting Portland Road and the Station is not easily accessible emphasising how the centre does not feel integrated
      • Some scope for ‘backlands’ development around the station but this is currently run-down and rather segregated
      • High Street and Portland Street offer small retail premises but there is relatively little larger scale activity.
    • 32. Adaptable South Norwood?
      • Diverse land uses are organised across scales of vehicular and pedestrian movement.
      • At larger scales of movement, retail, service and office activity are organised on a linear pattern associated with regional transport routes.
      • Activity tails off quickly either end of the High Street
      • The availability of high quality public and religious buildings in the vicinity of the centre and the accessibility of green space suggest potential for creating distinctive foci for local activity if these parts could be connected into a coherent whole
      • Cultural diversity gives South Norwood a positive and distinctive feel
      • Pedestrian movement ‘discovers’ a multi-scaled structure
      • Despite the strong linearity of the large scale structure, composite pedestrian movement shows a surprising degree of circulatory.
      • This movement pattern suggest how the fragmented parts of the centre have the potential to act as a whole, although the railway rcurrentlyepresents a formidable constraint to this being realised.
      • Station Road has potential to be a locally well connected place offering a focus for local circulation adjacent to the principal through-routes and local community spaces
    • 33. South Norwood 2008
    • 34. Towards Successful Suburban Town Centres Profiling London’s Suburbs – A detailed picture of Surbiton
    • 35. Adaptable suburbs – four propositions
      • When a suburban centre has persisted over a long period of time a basic condition for sustainability has been met
      • Considering the relationship of morphological structure and movement patterns helps reveal where the potential for adaptability lies
      • Street level activity is a source of long-term adaptability
      • By working with the historical ‘grain’ of a settlement form particular policy agendas have more chance of being successfully and efficiently implemented
    • 36. Surbiton area early 1800s
    • 37. The shifting centre of Surbiton (map shows late 1800s)
      • 1805
      • Hamlet
      • 1805-1822
      • Minor road south from Kingston
      • Development trajectory by c.1920
      • Extensive grid development centred on railway station (away from original centre)
      Probable location of Surbiton village - 1820s
    • 38. Continuity in form and function: Victoria Road Early 1900s 2008
    • 39. Surbiton: Back street activity
    • 40. Local opinion
      • … “ Surbiton’s got a lot of local employment which we’re keen to encourage and preserve. People don’t just commute to London, they commute to Surbiton”.
      • … “ Surbiton is predominantly retail, with the exception of Nuffield and DST. Small legal firms, accountants as well”.
      • … “ a lot of residents live on the other side of the railway. Half of Surbiton are cut off, none of the people past there feel part of Surbiton”.
      • (Various workshop participants, Jan 20 th 2009)
    • 41. Persistence areas of socio-economic and cultural activity
    • 42. Through route accessibility at 5 minutes walking distance
    • 43. Through route accessibility at 10 minutes walking distance
    • 44. Through route accessibility for short car journey
    • 45. Through route accessibility Greater London Region
    • 46. Town centre activity: movement traces all routes
    • 47. Town centre activity: tendency for circulatory movement at 10 minutes walking distance
    • 48. Adaptable Surbiton?
      • The morphology of Surbiton suggests an adaptable structure with considerable potential for sustainable development.
      • The location of Surbiton has shifted over time. The location of the pre-railway settlement on the borders of Kingston are still well integrated places though major through road can undermine this.
      • The street plan of Surbiton generally operates at two levels, major through roads and a well integrated hierarchy of smaller roads around the high street area.
      • The extended contemporary town centre is a composite of historically distinct regions including Brighton Road, Maple Road, Victoria Road and Ewell Road and the residential areas to the north of the high street.
      • The Surbiton area is also distinguished by a number of Victorian and Edwardian estate developments that support a local church, pub and shops.
      • The railway presents a barrier between the western and eastern sections of Surbiton – though pedestrians can pass through the station
      • The High Street itself is not an important historical through-route at the Greater London scale, which helps give the area a distinctive feeling of place.
      • Limited but accessible ‘backlands’ premises provide scope for small office developments, light industries servicing the town centre and diverse enterprises located in unremarkable vernacular buildings.
      • Large shopping centre well integrated into central area concentrates activity in the area directly in front of the station
    • 49. Adaptable Surbiton?
      • Diverse land uses are organised across scales of vehicular and pedestrian movement.
      • At larger scales of movement, retail, service and office activity are organised on a linear pattern associated with regional transport routes.
      • At more local scales land-uses can be seen to cluster around the historical areas of activity – this is emphasised when community and industrial functions with less need for high-movement locations are taken into account.
      • High quality residential buildings, adapted for a variety of uses, and well served for public buildings at the centre of local areas of activity.
      • Pedestrian movement takes advantage of multi-scaled structure
      • In the area west of the station, Surbiton’s morphology and land uses create complex circulatory pedestrian movement patterns connecting discrete historical areas of activity.
      • Movement around the main town centre even extends to the area east of the station along Ewell Road though is more linear in character – with the railway as a barrier.
      • Surbiton’s street plan, intelligible across at least two scales of movement, its diverse land uses and range of high quality buildings suggest it has a high potential to sustain itself as a centre of activity over time.
    • 50. Surbiton 2008

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