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Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
Indignenous Education in the Americas
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Indignenous Education in the Americas

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  • 1. Comparing Wyoming and Bolivian Indigenous Education Policies and Practices
    Burnett Whiteplume
    Carie Green
    Social Justice Research Grant
  • 2. First Encounters
    Airport exchanges
    Different Perspectives
    Apparent Separation
  • 3. Problem Statement:
    In Bolivia and Wyoming Indigenous students are struggling in culturally-irrelevant classrooms.
    Policies and practices are evolving to address this.
  • 4. Methodology
    Diverse Perspectives
    Co-constructed Narratives (Ellis, 2004)
    Site Visits
    Bolivia – three schools
    WY – two schools
    Preliminary Findings
  • 5. Preliminary Study
    Language and Cultural Barriers
    Initial contacts
    Building relationships
    Developing trust
    Time constraints
  • 6. Gaining Access
    Indian
    Congress of Indigenous Peoples
    Technical Assistance
    White
    Pre-service Teachers
  • 7. Politics in both countriesA Brief History
    Bolivia
    Gained Independence in 1805. All citizens were considered equal.
    Wyoming
    Wind River Reservation (home of the Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes) established in 1868.
    American Indians recognized as citizens in 1924.
  • 8. Bolivia
    Department of Education
    Nine states of Bolivia
    School Districts in States
    Local Schools
  • 9. Wyoming
    Indian Schools
    Tribes
    School District
    Local School
    Public Education
    U.S.
    Wyoming
    School Districts
    Local School
  • 10. Traditions & Customs
    Bolivia
    All equal
    Indigenous epistemologies interwoven
    Absence of Legal and Political basis
    Anyone can file a claim
    Wyoming
    Indian Removal
    Indian epistemologies suppressed
    Legal and Political basis
    Land is owned by Indians
  • 11. Constitutional AmendmentEvoMorales
    Implementation of second language acquisition for government officials (teachers)
    Passed 2009
    Normal School policy of language instruction
    Resistance
    Insufficient funding
  • 12. Language and Culture
    Bolivia
    Wyoming
    Spanish
    Aymara
    Quencha
    Policy
    Have to
    English
    Arapaho
    Shoshone
    No Policy
    Want to
  • 13. New Bolivian Education Policy
    AvelinoSiñani
    Passed December 2010
    “Decolonizing, liberating, anti-imperialist, revolutionary and transformative.”
    Emphasis on early-childhood education
    Opposition
    Church- deny parents the right to choose religious education
    Teacher training state instituted
  • 14. Bolivia-Wyoming Partnership
    Indios
    American Indian
    Campesinos
    Native American
    Thank you

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