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0739 Status of SRI Cultivation and its Future Prospects in India
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0739 Status of SRI Cultivation and its Future Prospects in India

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Presenter: M.C. Diwakar, Director, Directorate of Rice Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperation, Patna …

Presenter: M.C. Diwakar, Director, Directorate of Rice Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperation, Patna

Audience: 2nd National SRI Symposium, Agartala, India

Subject Country: India

Published in: Technology
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  • 1. STATUS OF SRI CULTIVATION AND ITS FUTURE PROSPECTS IN INDIA Dr. M.C. Diwakar , DIRECTOR DIRECTORATE OF RICE DEVELOPMENT, GOVT.OF INDIA MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE & COOPERATION, PATNA
  • 2.  
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5. Benefits of SRI * Seed requirement reduced by 65-70 per cent * Saving of water by about 35-45 per cent * More number of tillers/productive tillers * More number of spikelets per panicle * Uniform maturity * Head rice recovery is more * Earlier maturityby 5-20 days * Healthier plants resistant to major pests and diseases * Yield advantage over the conventional method by 1.5 to 2 times * Less competition between rice plant and weeds
  • 6. Why a Paradigm Shift is Needed The area of rice has been declining, and its productivity is also stagnating. There is fear among the scientific community that the country may not be in a position to feed India’s citizens based on the present growth rate and current trends of productivity of rice. The Green Revolution was successful for making our country self-sufficient in foodgrain production. However, the declining trend of food grain production during the past decades has become a great concern. The concept of Green Revolution was based on the following strategies:
  • 7. (i) Develop semi-dwarf high-yielding varieties and exploit their genetic potential (ii) Make them more responsive to fertiliser application (iii) Increase optimum use of inputs such as water, fertiliser, seeds, pesticides and farm implements (iv) Utilise non-monetary inputs such as timely sowing, spacing, and the timely application of fertilisers and harvesting.
  • 8. Strategies There is need to adopt other strategies in the present context as productivity is stagnating. Thus greater emphasis has to be given to bridging the gap between existing yields and potential yields demonstrated in the experimental fields. Appropriate strategies may be as follows: (i) Adoption of improved crop production technology and its dissemination to the farming community (ii) Popularisation of hybrid rice (iii) Promotion of System of Rice Intensification
  • 9. Hybrid Rice Demonstrations under SRI in Dindigul District, Tamil Nadu, 2004-05 Rice No. of demon-strations Area (acres) Average yield (kg / ha) Performance Hybrid 7 7 10,474 SRI gave 20-30 % more yield, vigorous crop growth, pest and disease resistance, and reduced weed problem HYV 13 13 7,045 Produced more tillers than conventional methods, more productive tillers, less disease and pests, 15% more yield, plus labour and water saving. Lower seed rate and reduced water requirement
  • 10. Table 8 Comparison of SRI Technology and Normal Practice in terms of Cost and Benefit Ratios Sl. No. Component Cultivation cost / acre Normal practice SRI 1 Nursery management Ploughing, manuring & water management 500 100 2. Seed cost 200 30 3 Seed treatment 15 15 4 Main field preparation Ploughing, organic manuring, bio-fertilizer application & bund formation 2000 2000 5 Inorganic manuring Basal application 1200 1200 Top dressing 400 400 6 Transplanting 800 1000
  • 11. 7 Weeding/ weedicide application 600 100 8 Plant protection / spraying (4 times) 1,200 900 9 Irrigation 350 350 10 Harvest 800 600 Total cultivation cost (Rs.) 8,065 6,695 Yield (kg/ Acre) 2,400 2,818 Value of produce (Rs.) 14,400 16,908 Benefit / acre (Rs.) 6,335 10,213 Benefit : cost ratio 1.78 : 1 2.5 : 1 Sl. No. Component Cultivation cost / acre Normal practice SRI
  • 12. Cost of cultivation (Rs. /ha) On-Farm Trial in Tamil Nadu Sl. No. Details SRI Conventional Difference 1 Nursery 842 2,607 1,765 2 Field preparation 1,550 1,550 - 3 Pulling planting 1,700 3,500 1,800 4 Weeding 2,175 2,700 525 5 Nutrition 3,310 2,657 (-) 653 6 Plant protection 375 375 - 7 Irrigation 750 750 - 8 Harvesting 5 580 4,290 (-) 1,290 Total 16,282 18,429 2,147
  • 13. Future Prospects of SRI
    • Biologically eco-friendly
    • No pollution in environment, water and soil
    • Increasing farmers’ income as well as enhancing their productivity
    • Higher benefit-cost ratio – 2.5 : 1
    • Technologies lead to organic farming
    • Less dependence on chemical fertilizers
    • Minimum use of pesticides
    • Early maturity of crop
  • 14. Popularisation of SRI technologies
    • This technology is being popularised in countries like Madagascar, Cambodia, Zambia, India, Myanmar, China, Philippines, Indonesia, Pakistan, and Nepal.
    • It is being popularised in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Tripura in almost all districts. Also State govts. in Bihar, Karnataka , Chhattishgarh , Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, and West Bengal are implementing SRI in selected districts to increase yield. To create awareness among farmers, training and demonstrations are being organised at the farmers’ field level under Macro Management of Agriculture.
    • SRI component has been added in the National Food SecurityMission.
  • 15. Variety-wise yield HYV Ave. yield with conv. method (mt/ha) Ave. yield with SRI method (mt/ha) No. of demos in farmer field (0.4 ha) Joya 3.4 -3.8 5.5 -6.2 37 Krishna Hamsha 3.8 -4.5 6.4- 6.8 134 Satabdi 3.0-3.5 4.8 -5.4 46 Swati 3.75-4.25 5.8-6.25 30
  • 16. HYV Ave. yield with conv. method (mt/ha) Ave. yield with SRI method (mt/ha) No. of demos in farmers field (0.4 ha) IR 64 4.5-5.0 7.2-7.6 192 MTU7029 4.5-5.5 7.2 -8.5 183 NDR 359 4.3-5.2 6.5 -7.2 73 NDR 97 2.5-3.0 4.6-5.0 64 POOJA 4.8-5.2 7.4 -8.2 124
  • 17. HYBRID HYBRID Ave. yield with conv. method (mt/ha) Ave. yield with SRI method (mt/ha) No. of demos in farmer field (0.4 ha) DRRH-1 6.0-6.5 7.6-8.1 19 KRH-2 6.5-7.0 8.2-8.7 35 PHB 71 6.5-7.0 8.1-8.5 28 SHEYADRI 6.2-6.8 7.2-7.8 15
  • 18. Variety-wise yield Local Ave. yield with conv. method (mt/ha) Ave. yield with SRI method (mt/ha) No. of demos in farmer fields (0.4 ha) Local varieties 2.0-3.0 3.8-4.3 37 Local scented varieties 1.5-2.0 3.1 -3.4 12
  • 19.  
  • 20.
    • Yield performance of SRI on rice crop in trials organised by the Directorate of Agriculture, Govt. of Andhra Pradesh
    Year Season No. of trials Ave. yield in SRI plot (kg/ha) Ave. yield in conventional plot (kg/ha) Yield advantage (kg/ha) 2003-04 Kharif/ rabi 476 7,917 5,479 2,438 2004-05 Kharif 599 7,310 5,561 1,749 Rabi 311 7,310 5,777 1,533 2005-06 Kharif 2,818 7,476 5,451 2,025 Rabi 11,792 7,390 5,620 1,770 2006-07 Kharif 7,653 6,724 5,005 1,718 Rabi 6,804 6,830 5,558 1,272
  • 21.  
  • 22.
    • Yield performance of SRI demonstration in Karnataka during 2004-05 to 2007-08
    Year No. of demonstrations SRI yield (mt/ha) Conventional yield (mt/ha) 2004-05 2040 6.45 5.20 2005-06 4528 6.57 5.31 2006-07 1020 6.54 5.12
  • 23.  
  • 24.
    • Yield performance of SRI demonstration in
    • Tamil Nadu during 2005-06 and 2006-07
    Year Average yield (kg/ha) Addl. Yield (kg/ha) Conventional cultivation SRI cultivation 2005-06 5,348 6,485 1,137 2006-07 5,800 7,400 1,600
  • 25.
    • Cost-benefit ratio:
    • Cost of cultivation in Tamil Nadu (SRI vs. conventional methods)
    Sl. No. Inputs/ Particular SRI Conventional Savings % 1 Nursery area 100 Sq.m 800 Sq.m 88 2 Seed cost (Rs.) 103.00 1212.00 90 3 Irrigation water 24 m 3 53 m 3 55 4 Fertiliser cost (Rs.) 18 180 90 5 Labour cost, incl. ploughing (Rs.) 1,200 1800 34 6 Other costs (Rs.) 120 - - Total costs (Rs.) 1,592 3,192 1,600 Net savings/ha = Rs. 1,600.00 contd..
  • 26.
    • Results of SRI experiments conducted in
    • Punjab State, 2006-07
    Method of cultivation (25 x 25 cm) SRI (without puddling) Non-SRI (with puddling) Panicle length (cm) 29.8 27.07 Total no. of grains 190 130 No. of tillers per sq. metre 415 171 Yield per sq. metre (grams) 785 475 No. of chaffy grains 22 24 Yield per acre (quintals) 31.4 19.0 1000-grain weight 18.60 17.34 Plant height (cm) 137 144.5 No. of irrigations 14 26
  • 27. Yield comparisons between conventional and SRI methods 54.79 59.88 83.79 55 70 2 79.17 70.45 104.74 85 87 3.4 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 A.P. T. N. HYV Hybrid Tripura HYV Hybrid Scented Yield (Q/ha) conventional Yield (Q/ha) SRI
  • 28. THANK YOU

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