0702 SRI: Report of PRADAN Staff Working in Eastern India
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0702 SRI: Report of PRADAN Staff Working in Eastern India

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Presenter: Binju Abraham, Nityananda Dhal, Prativa Sundaray ...

Presenter: Binju Abraham, Nityananda Dhal, Prativa Sundaray

Audience: SRI Study Group at Cornell University: Cornell International Institute for Food, Agriculture and Development (CIIFAD)

Subject Country: India

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  • this presentation is really true. Because i was working at PRADAN and practised SRI with 100 farmers and god excellent result out of that. It had totally changed the farming scenario of the rural farmer.
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0702 SRI: Report of PRADAN Staff Working in Eastern India 0702 SRI: Report of PRADAN Staff Working in Eastern India Presentation Transcript

  • System of Rice Intensification (SRI) Report of PRADAN staff working in Eastern India ( 2007)
  •  
  • Presentation by:
    • Binju Abraham
    • Nityananda Dhal
    • Prativa Sundaray
    • To SRI Study Group at Cornell University: Cornell International Institute for Food, Agriculture and Development (CIIFAD), April 13, 2007
  • Background Information: AREA APPEARANCE
  • Area Profile
    • High concentration of Scheduled Tribes (STs)
    • Farm-based livelihoods, 1200-1300 mm rainfall
    • Mostly small and marginal farmers, with 20% having 1.25 ha of land and 71% only 0.47 ha
    • Low mechanization of production
    • Average income per family per day = $1
    • Rice is the main staple crop
    • Average food security per household only 5 months so must seek outside employment to meet food needs year-round
  • PRADAN ROLE
    • Working primarily for livelihood promotion
    • Began paddy intervention in 1990
    • Promoting changes in traditional practices to attain higher yields
    • Introducing HYVs, pesticides, fertilizers, irrigation, services like credit, input supply, skill and know-how transfer, etc. – all conventional approaches
  • SRI first demonstrated and evaluated with 5 farmers in 2002
  • System of Rice Intensification
    • At first, had nervous professionals and nervous farmers.
    • SRI use expanded from 5 farmers in 2002, to 6,200 farmers in 2006 (1550 acres) as good results came in
  • SRI practices promoted
    • Seed selection and treatment:
      • Start with fresh seed stock
      • Use brine water treatment to select best seeds
  • Nursery raising in beds
  • Transplantation of young seedlings
    • ♦ Transplant seedlings 9-15 days old
    • ♦ Taking care not to disturb the roots
    • ♦ Plant one seedling per hill.
    • ♦ Spacing of 1ft row-to-row
    • ♦ Spacing of 1ft plant-to-plant – greatly reduce plant population
  • Transplantation of young seedlings, one per hill, wide and regular spacing
  • Fertilizer application
    • Reduced but not stopped (as with ‘organic SRI’)
    • Recommended application rates:
    • DAP 50 kg /ha
    • MOP 30 kg/ha
    • UREA 75 kg/ha
    • FYM 200 kg/ha
  • Urea applications split
  • Tillers per hill
  • Intermittent Water Management
  • Alternate drying and wetting
  • Patch promotion: needed to effect water savings
  • Lift irrigation as back up
  • Soil-aerating weeding 2 or 3 times
  • Comparison between SRI and conventional practices:
    • C onventional SRI
    • Seed rate 30 kg/ha 5 kg/ha
    • Seedling age 21-35 days 9-15days
    • Nursery size 10,750 sq ft 800 sq ft
    • Spacing 6 inches 1ft x 1ft
    • Transplantation Random Square
    • Weeding Single time 2-3 times
    • Input cost High Low
    • Yield 2 t/ha 6 t/ha
    • Fodder Less More (50%)
  • CROP ECONOMICS and YIELD ANALYSIS Summary data on PRADAN experience to date
  • Paddy yield with SRI practice, 2006 Yield range (t/ha) No. of farmers % of farmers 0-2 7 0.6 2-4 82 7.5 4-6 278 25.3 6-8 425 38.6 8-10 267 24.3 > 10 41 3.7 Total 1,100 100%
  • Comparative Analysis – same farmers, same farms, different results: 6.88 t/ha vs 5.78 t/ha SRI Conventional Range Farmers %   Range Farmers % 0-2 1 0.26 0-2 2 0.51 2 to 4 21 5.37 2 to 4 58 14.83 4 to6 94 24.04 4 to 6 154 39.39 6 to 8 171 43.73 6 to 8 148 37.85 8 to 10 94 24.04 8 to 10 29 7.42 >10 10 2.56 >10 0 0.00 Total 391 100 Total 391 100
  • Comparative Analysis…
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Comparative Analysis
  • From: Sinha and Talati (2005), evaluation of rainfed SRI by team from IWMI-India Programme, from 2004 season (N=110)
  • Response to variety
  • Yield comparison in different land type
  • Input productivity
  • Crop economics comparison
  • Distribution of Labor Demand vs. Supply
  • COMPARISON OF LABOUR HOURS
  • Rainfall & practice/labour dynamics
  • Trends in SRI adoption Area Range (Decimal) % Last year (05-06) % This year (06-07) (163 farmers) (1,565 farmers) <16 54 32 16-32 24 27 32-48 12 22 48-64 3 2 64-80 3 7 >80 4 10 TOTAL 100 100
  • Trends in SRI adoption Category of farmer Same year 1-year lag 2-years or more lag Drop-outs 45 --  --  Conv. yields > SRI yields 21 7 4 SRI yields > Conv. yields 34 48 26 TOTAL 54% 30% 16%
  • Trends in practice adoption Table 1: SRI practices in Purulia (N=110) in 2005 and (N=391) in 2006   Practice N=110 N=391 Early transplant (<14 days) 48% 75% Single seedling per hill 97% 98% Wide spacing 100% 100% Alternate wetting and drying 12% 3% Weeding (2 or more times) 54% 16% Mechanical weeding 0% 86%
  • Trends in SRI adoption
  • Trends in SRI adoption
    • 50% farmers choose SRI in medium upland areas
    • 25% each choose SRI in medium upland and lowland
  • Constraints in adopting SRI
    • Lack of reliable irrigation can discourage farmers from going for full SRI
    • Difficulties in draining off standing water from some lowland areas
    • Cash-flow requirement in weeding period restricts poor
    • Social factors affecting self-replication
    • Timeliness of operations needed in SRI
    • Scaling-up of SRI would depend on land and water infrastructure development
  • Scope of SRI as a pro-poor intervention
    • Attractive non-monetary intervention that can enhance food self-sufficiency
    • Provides fodder for cattle
    • Since the components of SRI are independent and flexible, this makes it very adaptable
    • Less technology-intensive and thus more self-spreading
    • Lower requirement of labour and possible staggering of labour demand
    • Ability to strategize to offset monsoon variations
  • Areas of Future Research and Action
    • Need to standardize the fertilizer doses recommended with SRI package
    • Need to understand and explain why the fluctuations in SRI yield, and why the low conversion of tillers to panicles in some instances
    • Institutionalizing SRI among researchers, rural development practitioners, government agric. line departments needed for large-scale replication in zones of low food sufficiency