AT9
Concurrent Session 
11/8/2012 3:45 PM 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

"Agile at Scale with Scrum:
The Good, the Bad, and th...
 
 
Heather Gray
Cisco Systems
Heather Gray was introduced to agile when the senior vice president of her organization iss...
Agile at Scale with Scrum
The GOOD
GOOD, the 

, and the 

Steve Spearman

Heather Gray

steve@agileevolution.com

hgray@a...
The Overview…
Successful business unit 
at one of the world’s 
largest networking 
companies.
‘Mandated’ to BE AGILE!
Tran...
Learnings from Our Challenges
• Acquiring the RIGHT executive 
support.
• Moving away from component‐
based specialization...
High Level Approach
Vision / 
Mandate

Change Org & 
Inspect/Adapt Communication

Train & Coach 
Globally

Transition 
Tea...
Forming Teams
Start with…                                the Matrix

9

Scaling Approach
Project
Core Team
AreaTeam 1

Are...
Where Do We Find SM’s & PO’s?

11

What About Managers?
• Role confusion at first
• Self‐organizing versus 
self‐managing
...
And Project Managers?
• Transition or disappear in 
some small organizations
ll
i ti
• Still critical in large ones
• Styl...
Moving Away from Components

So we formed Scrums from diverse expertise areas
15

Moving Away from Components

Each Releas...
Moving Away from Components

Over time, teams’ capabilities grow but ownership stays stable
17

Meanwhile, On the Other Si...
Other Transition Team Learnings

• Perils of Part timers
• Scrum ‐> Kanban
• Beware “Central Agile”
• Portfolio change is ...
Integration Nightmares
The Problem
• Complex and very large 
builds 
– 2 days to get a build done 
and verified.

• Develo...
Automated Testing
The Automation Framework you use depends on what you are testing.   
We end up using all of these at som...
Management
Customer Focus

Feature Driven

• Assigning Tasks
• Constant overtime
• 100%+ allocated
• Self organizing 
team...
The PMO
Feature Driven

•
•
•
•
•
•

Customer Focus

Value Driven

Long planning cycles
Long planning cycles
Established p...
29

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Agile at Scale with Scrum: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

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Come hear the story of how a business unit at one of the world's largest networking companies transitioned to Scrum in eighteen months. The good-more than forty teams in one part of the company moved quickly and are going gangbusters. The bad-an adjacent part failed in its transition. The ugly-if you're in a large company with globally distributed teams, it's not hard to torpedo Scrum adoption. Steve Spearman and Heather Gray describe Scrum adoption challenges for a multi-million line, monolithic system developed across multiple locations worldwide. They share the techniques and tools that helped them implement Scrum in just two project cycles and the reasons part of the company failed to make the leap. Find out how they gained critical executive support, moved from component-based specialization to Scrum's generalizing specialists, found enough ScrumMasters, adjusted to twelve-hour time differences, and dealt with classical PMOs. Take away concrete approaches to improve your enterprise agile conversion-and an appreciation for problems you will surely face.

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Agile at Scale with Scrum: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

  1. 1.           AT9 Concurrent Session  11/8/2012 3:45 PM                "Agile at Scale with Scrum: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly"       Presented by: Heather Gray, Cisco Systems Steven Spearman, AgileEvolution             Brought to you by:        340 Corporate Way, Suite 300, Orange Park, FL 32073  888‐268‐8770 ∙ 904‐278‐0524 ∙ sqeinfo@sqe.com ∙ www.sqe.com
  2. 2.     Heather Gray Cisco Systems Heather Gray was introduced to agile when the senior vice president of her organization issued a mandate to “Be Agile.” That mandate was the start of an occupational awakening beginning first with an understanding of what agile meant and then rolling out agile practices across her large organization. Heather has worked for the past eighteen years with software development teams using strict waterfall process, no process at all, and now finally agile practices. Her most recent role was senior manager for Cisco Systems' IP Communication Business Unit where, in addition to managing the Program Management Office, she led the business unit’s transformation to agile.     Steve Spearman AgileEvolution With more than thirty years of development experience, Steve Spearman brings a wealth of real-world experience to his role as an Agile Coach and Trainer. With a background in enterprise development, he enjoys the opportunity to help teams of any size succeed in their own agile transitions. Steve is active in the Agile Denver and Agile Boulder communities. As a reformed project manager and PMP, Steve is passionate about working with multiple PMI chapters to roll out agile principles, teaching the PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner (ACP) prep class, and volunteering with the PMI-ACP support team. Steve works with AgileEvolution and can be reached at steve@agileevolution.com.  
  3. 3. Agile at Scale with Scrum The GOOD GOOD, the  , and the  Steve Spearman Heather Gray steve@agileevolution.com hgray@agileevolution.com 1 Why Make the Change? Dante’s Inferno illustration, Botticelli circa 1640 2 1
  4. 4. The Overview… Successful business unit  at one of the world’s  largest networking  companies. ‘Mandated’ to BE AGILE! Transitioned to Scrum in  eighteen months.  3 The BIG Picture… The GOOD ‐ forty+ pilot teams , moved quickly  and are rocking today.  The  ‐ an adjacent part of the BU failed in  its transition and failed in the market too… The ‐ lots of challenges! 4 2
  5. 5. Learnings from Our Challenges • Acquiring the RIGHT executive  support. • Moving away from component‐ based specialization. • Finding the right people for the  key roles. • Forming and scaling teams. • Shortening Our Integration Cycles Our Integration Cycles. • Handling the geographic  challenges. 5 The Organization • 6 Development locations 6 Development locations – 4 US Time zones + India & China • • • • > 400 Engineers > 50 component teams 5 Major Product Lines 5 Major Product Lines 12‐18 month release cycles 6 3
  6. 6. High Level Approach Vision /  Mandate Change Org &  Inspect/Adapt Communication Train & Coach  Globally Transition  Team Scale & Fill  Key Roles 7 Executive Support We had a Mandate So what’s the Problem? 8 4
  7. 7. Forming Teams Start with…                                the Matrix 9 Scaling Approach Project Core Team AreaTeam 1 Area Team 2 AreaTeam 3 Sub Teams AreaTeam 4 Sub Teams Scrum Teams Scrum Teams Scrum Teams Scrum Teams 10 5
  8. 8. Where Do We Find SM’s & PO’s? 11 What About Managers? • Role confusion at first • Self‐organizing versus  self‐managing • Eventual changes in  span of control • Managers can be PO’s Managers can be PO’s  and maybe even SM’s!  (but only in certain places) 12 6
  9. 9. And Project Managers? • Transition or disappear in  some small organizations ll i ti • Still critical in large ones • Styles change • A mix of old and new  skills work best at the  skills work best at the project level “It is not the strongest of the  species that survive, nor the  most intelligent, but the one  most intelligent but the one most responsive to change.” 13 Moving Away from Components Our Specializations seemed as diverse as stars in the sky 14 7
  10. 10. Moving Away from Components So we formed Scrums from diverse expertise areas 15 Moving Away from Components Each Release, we ask Teams to expand knowledge a little 16 8
  11. 11. Moving Away from Components Over time, teams’ capabilities grow but ownership stays stable 17 Meanwhile, On the Other Side of the  Organization…. Agile is attempted …. As a Cargo Cult??? 18 9
  12. 12. Other Transition Team Learnings • Perils of Part timers • Scrum ‐> Kanban • Beware “Central Agile” • Portfolio change is hard • Synchronized sprints • Automation 19 Scrum Teams Across  Geographies 20 10
  13. 13. Integration Nightmares The Problem • Complex and very large  builds  – 2 days to get a build done  and verified. • Developed on 30+ branches  creating ‘Integration hell’  upon collapse ll • Automated Regression took  2 days with questionable  coverage 21 Continuous Integration The Answer • D di Dedicated a crack  d k development team – Got the build down to 4 hours  in most cases – Highly parallel builds & a  server farm – Reduced development  branches to 1‐10 per release branches to 1‐10 per release – Reduced regression test to 16  hours • Same team helped  automate testing 22 11
  14. 14. Automated Testing The Automation Framework you use depends on what you are testing.    We end up using all of these at some point: 23 The Business Feature Driven • Multiple priorities • Massive releases • No involvement  after planning • Constant change  requests • Feature Bloat Customer Focus • 1‐n priority list • Part of the team • New PBI to manage  change h • Focus on providing  value not content Value Driven • Actual customer  engagement • No CCB 24 12
  15. 15. Management Customer Focus Feature Driven • Assigning Tasks • Constant overtime • 100%+ allocated • Self organizing  teams • Dedicated teams Value Driven • Persistent teams • Realistic  commitments • Innovation time 25 Engineering Feature Driven • Component based Component based  teams • Big Serial phases • Integration ‘hell' Customer Focus • Increasingly cross‐ functional teams • Iterative  development,  smaller hand offs • Continuous  Integration Value Driven • True cross  functional teams functional teams • TDD • Collective code  ownership 26 13
  16. 16. The PMO Feature Driven • • • • • • Customer Focus Value Driven Long planning cycles Long planning cycles Established process Protecting the plan • JIT planning Fighting change • Lower ceremony Questionable visibility • Continual  • p improvement Crashing the path Crashing the path • Higher visibility • • Minimally sufficient  ceremony Even more visibility Value Stream  Mapping 27 Where Did it End Up? Never done, but…. OUR Team “OUR” Team The  Other Team The “Other” Team 28 14
  17. 17. 29 15

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