Welcome to the Webinar     Health Communication Matters!Applying Health Literate Communications:    Examples from a Nasty ...
Today you’ll be hearing from.              ..     Nancy               Michael            Yvonne Garcia, Murphy, MSHC     V...
Agenda1. Review of session objectives2. Introduction of today’s speakers3. Does your public health message work?4. Questio...
Objectives• Explain definitions of health literacy and plain language,  statistics, prevalence, and costs associated with ...
Health Literacy:Undervalued byPublic Health?A tool for public healthprofessionals.Prepared for the American Public HealthA...
Who is in our audience                        Employer/Organization35302520151050     Academic City/Co Fed govt Hospital P...
Who is in our audience        Geography                              California                              Other states ...
Who is in our audience                           ProfessionMostly HealthPromotion/HealthEducationprofessionals . . . Andgo...
What do you want to learn     from this webinar?• About 1/3 said specifics around flu messaging• About 2/3 said health lit...
How to Participate• Phone line is automatically  on mute• Send facilitator a question or  comment using Ready Talk’s chat ...
Who is speaking today:   Michael Villaire       Michael Villaire, MSLM       Chief Operating Officer, Institute for       ...
Who is speaking today:   Yvonne Garcia       Yvonne Garcia,       Influenza Communication       Lead, Health Communication...
Who is moderating our  discussion today:Nancy Murphy, MSHC      Nancy Murphy, MSHC      Executive Vice      President, Met...
Questions welcomed• Submit a question at any time during this Webinar using the  chat function OR clicking the “raise hand...
Before we launch into our presentations,       here is a question for you:What drew you to this webinar?A.   Learn more ab...
Introducing Michael Villaire          Michael Villaire, MSLM          Chief Operating Officer, Institute for          Heal...
Health Literacy 101:Does Your Public Health Message            Work?     Public Health Matters Webinar               March...
Literacy• “Using printed and written information to function  in society, to achieve one’s goals, and to develop  one’s kn...
Definitions                          Health Literacy• “The degree to which individuals have the capacity  to obtain, proce...
Why Does Health Literacy Matter?Those with limited literacy skills:• Report poorer overall health• Have poorer ability to ...
Why Does Health Literacy Matter?            Cost of Poor Health Literacy• $73 billion in unnecessary costs annually  (Frie...
NAAL Health Literacy Findings• 36% have limited health literacy skills  (22% Basic, 14% Below Basic)• About 12% considered...
You knowwhat you mean…But does   he?
A question for Michael      So we can see that we      clearly have a problem!      What are some specific      ways that ...
7 Points to Ensure Your Materials          are On Target•   Audience•   Message•   Readability•   Design•   Culturally App...
Audience•   Who is your audience?•   What are their needs?•   What are they interested in?•   What is their ability?•   Wh...
Message• What do you want them to do?• Limit to no more than 3 concepts.• What do they need to do the behavior?
Readability•   Grade reading level•   Active voice•   Short sentences (10-15 words max)•   Short, simple words (no jargon)...
Readability• Readability measures  – SMOG (Simple Measure of Gobbledygook)  – Count words with more than 3 syllables in 30...
Design• White space• Large type size (12-14 point) and double-  spaced• Standard font (no italics or ALL CAPS)• Two type f...
More Design• Usable, appropriate, explanatory  graphics (no abstract graphics)• Use columns• Bulleted lists (keep to 7-8 m...
A question for Michael      Do you have a sample      document that we might      engage our participants in      evaluati...
Design critique• What’s good?• What’s not so good?
Real-lifeExamplesFrom “What To Do When YourChild Gets Sick” Institute forHealthcare Advancementwww.iha4health.org
Real-life  ExamplesFrom “Living With Diabetes:An Everyday Guide for Youand Your Family”American College ofPhysicians Found...
Real-lifeExamples:PhotonovelaFrom “From Junk Food toHealthy Eating: TanyasJourney to a Better Life”Inter-Cultural Associat...
“The Bible”Available from:•http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy/resources/doak-book/•IHA Health LiteracyConference
Key takeaways  • Only about 12% of American adults are  estimated to have the level of skill  necessary to understand heal...
Join the Conversation!      Questions or comments for      Michael?      Please submit questions by using      the chat fu...
Discussion/Q&AAsk Michael!Share with Michael!
Poll QuestionTo check the reading level on a document, I:a. Use the grade level scoring on MSWordb. Use another readabilit...
Introducing Yvonne Garcia         Yvonne Garcia         Influenza Communication Lead         Health Communications Special...
CDC Influenza Communication Campaign“Examples from an Eventful Flu Season”                                Yvonne Garcia   ...
Objectives   Provide CDC communication strategies designed to    address different types of challenges, such as flu vacci...
CDC Communication GoalsConsistent messages about importance of universal fluvaccination and benefits: Keep top of mind.Ste...
Communication Challenges   Vast number of messages and misinformation out there   Vaccine safety and efficacy   Many va...
Target Audiences   Everyone 6 months of age and older   Special Focus   Parents of young children   Older adults (65+)...
A question for Yvonne      Wow! So you have many      challenges in messaging      AND you’re trying to reach      broad a...
Campaign ElementsGeneral Audience: national, multi-sector partnersrepresenting business, health, retail, nationalorganizat...
CDC Partners in Actionfrom Times Square to small town USA
Campaign Elements   CDC Support Mechanisms:     Digital and social media     Materials and Tools     Flu Partner Porta...
Digital and Social Media ToolsNew and Digital Media • Publisher Outreach • Content syndication • CDC email alerts • Mobile...
Digital and Social Media ToolsContent Syndication: http://tools.cdc.gov/syndication/RSS Feeds: http://www2c.cdc.gov/podcas...
Flu Vaccine Hesitancy   “The flu vaccine will give you the flu…I got sick with the    flu after I got a flu shot ”   “I’...
A question for Yvonne?       And so in spite of all those       great outreach       strategies, some people still       h...
Educating the public about influenza   Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused    by influenza vir...
Educating the public about influenza   It takes about two weeks after vaccination for the body’s    immune response to fu...
75034
Resources• Matte articles• PSA’s• Print Materials• Web Buttons, Banners, and Widgets
Cold vs fluInfluenza Symptoms: can be mild to severeThe flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feels...
Educating the public about flu vaccine   There are two reasons for getting a yearly flu vaccine:    1. Flu viruses are co...
Flu Season Communication Tactics   Provide media, the public, clinicians, public health and other partners with    rapid,...
Resourceshttp://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/index.htm
2013-2014 Flu Season   Goals: Focus groups to test new logo and theme, quadrivalent    vaccine message testing and fact s...
Thank you!            Contact: fluinbox@cdc.gov   For more information please contact Centers for Disease    Control and ...
Key takeaways  • Understanding perceived benefits  and barriers to vaccination among  target audiences is key in designing...
Poll QuestionIf I were trying to persuade someone to get a flu shot, I would:     a) Tell them how many people die from fl...
Join the Conversation!      Questions or comments for      Yvonne?      Please submit questions by using      the chat fun...
Discussion/Q&AAsk Yvonne!Share with Yvonne!
Join the Conversation!      Questions or comments for either      panelist?      Please submit questions by using      the...
Questions for our speakersMichael Villaire, MSLM   Yvonne GarciaChief Operating          Centers forOfficer, Institute for...
Health Literacy:Undervalued byPublic Health?A tool for public healthprofessionals.Prepared for the American Public HealthA...
Learning more. . .• Following today’s webinar, you will receive an email  with a link to  • A recording of today’s webinar...
Evaluation & Questions• An evaluation will pop up on your screen  immediately following the conclusion of today’s  webinar...
Resources• CDC: Health  Literacyhttp://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/index.html• National Institute For Literacy (NIFL) healt...
Additional Resources• www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/etr.html• www.coveringkidsandfamilies.org/resources/docs/stylemanual.pdf...
Speaker Contact InformationMichael Villaire, MSLM, Chief Operating OfficerInstitute for Healthcare Advancementmvillaire@ih...
Thank you to our Sponsors  Community Health  Planning and Policy  Development  Section, APHA
Thank you to our planning             committee• Tammy Pilisuk, MPH, APHA-CHPPD• Erin Brigham, MPH, CareSource, APHA-CHPPD...
Thank you to our speakers!Michael                         Yvonne GarciaVillaire, MSLM, Institute for   Centers forHealthca...
About This Series• The Health Communication Matters series will help participants in all  walks of public health to apply ...
Conclusion  Thank you!www.calpact.org
CALPACT Webinar: Applying Health Literate Communications- Examples from a Nasty Flu Season
CALPACT Webinar: Applying Health Literate Communications- Examples from a Nasty Flu Season
CALPACT Webinar: Applying Health Literate Communications- Examples from a Nasty Flu Season
CALPACT Webinar: Applying Health Literate Communications- Examples from a Nasty Flu Season
CALPACT Webinar: Applying Health Literate Communications- Examples from a Nasty Flu Season
CALPACT Webinar: Applying Health Literate Communications- Examples from a Nasty Flu Season
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CALPACT Webinar: Applying Health Literate Communications- Examples from a Nasty Flu Season

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This presentation is from a recent CALPACT webinar. To view the event archive page to access the recording and resources, please visit:

https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/s/meetingArchive?eventId=ws23yprxpjgd&campaignId=xceb0hiurg66

Public Health professionals communicate with a variety of audiences in their daily work. While reasonably well-accepted that special consideration be given to low-literate health care consumers in clinical settings, less emphasis has been given to applying health literacy in diverse sectors of public health. Poor health literacy is not limited to those with language or reading skill barriers - only 12% of Americans understand the health information they receive.

As public health professionals we have a responsibility to understand the health literacy barriers. This presentation will provide tips and resources where public health professionals can make a difference in increasing the success of their communication efforts.

While one flu season can pass mildly and with minimal activity, another may hit the country early and hard. CDC health communicators work with subject matter experts and stakeholders to develop messages for a variety of audiences, employing different types of media for effective reach. Due to unforeseen variables, the 2012-2013 flu season posed specific challenges. This presentation will highlight some of those challenges, showcase strategies and messaging used, and preview what’s to come for the 2013-2014 season.

This webinar was the second session in the CALPACT sponsored Health Communication Matters series, which will help participants in all walks of public health to apply health literacy principles to their everyday communications.

Follow Us on Twitter: @CALPACT
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CALPACTUCB
Website: www.calpact.org

Questions?

Email sphcalpact@berkeley.edu

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  • Nancy gives highlights from Kathryn’s bio here
  • Nancy gives highlights from Kathryn’s bio here
  • Nancy says: And I’m your moderator…
  • First audience question
  • Nancy transitions to Dara
  • NM: As we transition to the next panelist…
  • NM: As we transition to the next panelist…
  • First audience question
  • Nancy transitions to Dara
  • NM: As we transition to the next panelist…
  • NM: As we transition to the next panelist…
  • NM: As we transition to the next panelist…
  • CALPACT Webinar: Applying Health Literate Communications- Examples from a Nasty Flu Season

    1. 1. Welcome to the Webinar Health Communication Matters!Applying Health Literate Communications: Examples from a Nasty Flu Season We will begin shortly…
    2. 2. Today you’ll be hearing from. .. Nancy Michael Yvonne Garcia, Murphy, MSHC Villaire, MSLM, Ins Centers for Disease , Metropolitan titute for Healthcare Control & Prevention Group, Moderat Advancement or
    3. 3. Agenda1. Review of session objectives2. Introduction of today’s speakers3. Does your public health message work?4. Questions & Answers5. CDC Influenza Communication Campaign: “Examples from an Eventful Flu Season”6. Questions & Answers7. Specific actions and resources8. Next steps & conclusion
    4. 4. Objectives• Explain definitions of health literacy and plain language, statistics, prevalence, and costs associated with limited health literacy• Describe the role of health professionals as change agents for effective communications with diverse audiences• List strategies to develop health materials for readability/usability• Explain how CDC communicators apply fundamentals of risk communication and plain language to reach a diverse audience
    5. 5. Health Literacy:Undervalued byPublic Health?A tool for public healthprofessionals.Prepared for the American Public HealthAssociation Community Health Planning &Policy Development SectionTammy Pilisuk, MPH AUG 2011
    6. 6. Who is in our audience Employer/Organization35302520151050 Academic City/Co Fed govt Hospital Private CBO State Other Health industry Health dept.
    7. 7. Who is in our audience Geography California Other states 25 states represented
    8. 8. Who is in our audience ProfessionMostly HealthPromotion/HealthEducationprofessionals . . . Andgood representationfromadministrators, nutritionists, nurses, dataanalysts, policyspecialists & faculty
    9. 9. What do you want to learn from this webinar?• About 1/3 said specifics around flu messaging• About 2/3 said health literacy or effective health communication tools and tactics• Plus. . . Practical examples, tips, tools, trends and models
    10. 10. How to Participate• Phone line is automatically on mute• Send facilitator a question or comment using Ready Talk’s chat function• Click “raise hand” button to be taken off mute and ask a question verbally• Slides and resources will be posted online following webinar – link will be shared via email with all participants
    11. 11. Who is speaking today: Michael Villaire Michael Villaire, MSLM Chief Operating Officer, Institute for Healthcare Advancement Email: mvillaire@iha4health.org Website: www.iha4health.org
    12. 12. Who is speaking today: Yvonne Garcia Yvonne Garcia, Influenza Communication Lead, Health Communications Specialist, CDC/NCIRD Email: ybg2@cdc.gov Website: www.cdc.gov
    13. 13. Who is moderating our discussion today:Nancy Murphy, MSHC Nancy Murphy, MSHC Executive Vice President, Metropolitan Group Email: nmurphy@metgroup.com Website: www.metgroup.com
    14. 14. Questions welcomed• Submit a question at any time during this Webinar using the chat function OR clicking the “raise hand” button to be taken off mute.• We will consolidate questions and pose them to the speakers throughout the Webinar and during the Q&A session at the end.• We also may host additional webinars on related health communication topics depending on the results of the evaluation, so please tell us if you want more!
    15. 15. Before we launch into our presentations, here is a question for you:What drew you to this webinar?A. Learn more about health literacy for myselfB. To help colleagues apply health literacyC. I am interested in flu messaging
    16. 16. Introducing Michael Villaire Michael Villaire, MSLM Chief Operating Officer, Institute for Healthcare Advancement
    17. 17. Health Literacy 101:Does Your Public Health Message Work? Public Health Matters Webinar March 27, 2013 Michael Villaire, MSLM Chief Operating Officer Institute for Healthcare Advancement www.iha4health.org mvillaire@iha4health.org (800) 434-4633 x202
    18. 18. Literacy• “Using printed and written information to function in society, to achieve one’s goals, and to develop one’s knowledge and potential” (Kirsch et al, 1993)
    19. 19. Definitions Health Literacy• “The degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions” (Ratzan and Parker, 2000)• “Health literacy allows the public and personnel working in all health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Health literacy is the use of a wide range of skills that … include reading, writing, listening, speaking, numeracy, and critical analysis, as well as communication and interaction skills.” (Calgary Charter on Health Literacy, 2008)
    20. 20. Why Does Health Literacy Matter?Those with limited literacy skills:• Report poorer overall health• Have poorer ability to manage chronic diseases• Have poorer outcomes• Less likely to understand their diagnosis• Less likely to have screening / preventive care• Present in later stages of disease• Are more likely to be hospitalized / rehospitalized
    21. 21. Why Does Health Literacy Matter? Cost of Poor Health Literacy• $73 billion in unnecessary costs annually (Friedland, Georgetown University, 2003)• $106-$238 billion in unnecessary costs annually (Vernon, University of Connecticut, 2007) Cost of Chronic Disease• $1.7 trillion (75% of HC expenditures)• Nearly 1 in 2 Americans live with a chronic disease• 90% >65 have a chronic disease; 77% have 2+• 70% of annual US deaths (CDC 2008)
    22. 22. NAAL Health Literacy Findings• 36% have limited health literacy skills (22% Basic, 14% Below Basic)• About 12% considered Proficient• Women’s avg. HL score 6 pts. higher (4% more men in Below Basic)
    23. 23. You knowwhat you mean…But does he?
    24. 24. A question for Michael So we can see that we clearly have a problem! What are some specific ways that we can increase the likelihood of the public understanding our public health messages?
    25. 25. 7 Points to Ensure Your Materials are On Target• Audience• Message• Readability• Design• Culturally Appropriate• Learnable• Field-test
    26. 26. Audience• Who is your audience?• What are their needs?• What are they interested in?• What is their ability?• What are their barriers?
    27. 27. Message• What do you want them to do?• Limit to no more than 3 concepts.• What do they need to do the behavior?
    28. 28. Readability• Grade reading level• Active voice• Short sentences (10-15 words max)• Short, simple words (no jargon)• Use examples• Define unfamiliar / technical words
    29. 29. Readability• Readability measures – SMOG (Simple Measure of Gobbledygook) – Count words with more than 3 syllables in 30 sentences – Use conversion table to obtain grade reading level http://www.harrymclaughlin.com/SMOG.htm
    30. 30. Design• White space• Large type size (12-14 point) and double- spaced• Standard font (no italics or ALL CAPS)• Two type faces (Arial-headings; Times New Roman-body)• Simple headings. . .
    31. 31. More Design• Usable, appropriate, explanatory graphics (no abstract graphics)• Use columns• Bulleted lists (keep to 7-8 max)• Color / Navigation
    32. 32. A question for Michael Do you have a sample document that we might engage our participants in evaluating based on the tips you have shared with us so far?
    33. 33. Design critique• What’s good?• What’s not so good?
    34. 34. Real-lifeExamplesFrom “What To Do When YourChild Gets Sick” Institute forHealthcare Advancementwww.iha4health.org
    35. 35. Real-life ExamplesFrom “Living With Diabetes:An Everyday Guide for Youand Your Family”American College ofPhysicians Foundationfoundation.acponline.org/hl/hlresources.htm
    36. 36. Real-lifeExamples:PhotonovelaFrom “From Junk Food toHealthy Eating: TanyasJourney to a Better Life”Inter-Cultural Associationof Greater Victoriawww.photonovel.ca/photonovels.htm
    37. 37. “The Bible”Available from:•http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy/resources/doak-book/•IHA Health LiteracyConference
    38. 38. Key takeaways • Only about 12% of American adults are estimated to have the level of skill necessary to understand health information. That leaves 88% of us with some serious challenges! • Failure to address health literacy challenges effectively has real and significant costs. • There are simple tools that can make a real difference – focus on white space, short words and sentences, limited number of concepts – readability and design matter.
    39. 39. Join the Conversation! Questions or comments for Michael? Please submit questions by using the chat function OR clicking the “raise hand” button to be taken off mute We have our first question for Michael. . .
    40. 40. Discussion/Q&AAsk Michael!Share with Michael!
    41. 41. Poll QuestionTo check the reading level on a document, I:a. Use the grade level scoring on MSWordb. Use another readability calculatorc. Is that the same as “spell check?”d. I need to check the reading level???!!
    42. 42. Introducing Yvonne Garcia Yvonne Garcia Influenza Communication Lead Health Communications Specialist CDC/NCIRD Atlanta, Georgia
    43. 43. CDC Influenza Communication Campaign“Examples from an Eventful Flu Season” Yvonne Garcia March 27, 2013 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
    44. 44. Objectives Provide CDC communication strategies designed to address different types of challenges, such as flu vaccine hesitancy Describe effective health communication strategies with disparate populations that may be vaccine hesitant Explain how CDC communicators apply fundamentals of risk communication and plain language in materials to reach a broad and diverse audience
    45. 45. CDC Communication GoalsConsistent messages about importance of universal fluvaccination and benefits: Keep top of mind.Steady increases in flu vaccination coverage over time.Special focus on people at high-risk for complications fromflu.Foster knowledge and favorable beliefs regarding influenzavaccine and vaccination recommendations.Maintain and extend confidence in flu vaccine safety.Address disparities in vaccination coverage.
    46. 46. Communication Challenges Vast number of messages and misinformation out there Vaccine safety and efficacy Many vaccine formulations for different groups of individuals Misconceptions: flu is a bad cold; flu vaccine will give you the flu; flu vaccine in not effective Audiences: similarities and differences Adult vaccination disparity and health disparate population reach Shrinking budgets
    47. 47. Target Audiences Everyone 6 months of age and older Special Focus Parents of young children Older adults (65+) People with chronic medical conditions Pregnant women People who live with or care for those at high risk for complications from flu, including: • Health care workers • Household contacts and caregivers of children less than 5 years of age, especially children less than 6 months of age Minority/ethnic populations
    48. 48. A question for Yvonne Wow! So you have many challenges in messaging AND you’re trying to reach broad and diverse audiences. What are some specific ways you addressed those challenges and reached those audiences effectively in the 2012-2013 flu season?
    49. 49. Campaign ElementsGeneral Audience: national, multi-sector partnersrepresenting business, health, retail, nationalorganizations, sports organizations, universities, multi-media, etc.Minority Populations: grassroots stakeholder engagementand cross collaboration with healthdepartments/organizations, CBOs, faith-based, pharmaciesand other vaccinators, ethnic media outlets, business, etc.
    50. 50. CDC Partners in Actionfrom Times Square to small town USA
    51. 51. Campaign Elements CDC Support Mechanisms:  Digital and social media  Materials and Tools  Flu Partner Portal  Capacity Building Plans (Webinars, Flu 101, Social Media) Traditional Media: television/radio/print PSAs, interviews Education and outreach to health care professionals
    52. 52. Digital and Social Media ToolsNew and Digital Media • Publisher Outreach • Content syndication • CDC email alerts • Mobile messaging • Smart phone/iPad apps Social Media • Twitter chats • Blogs
    53. 53. Digital and Social Media ToolsContent Syndication: http://tools.cdc.gov/syndication/RSS Feeds: http://www2c.cdc.gov/podcasts/rss.aspCDC Flu Twitter: http://twitter.com/CDCFluCDC Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CDCReceive notices as CDC posts updates to specific flu web pages: http://www.cdc.gov/Other/emailupdates/
    54. 54. Flu Vaccine Hesitancy “The flu vaccine will give you the flu…I got sick with the flu after I got a flu shot ” “I’m healthy and don’t need a flu shot” “I’ve never had the flu so why get a flu shot” “ I’m afraid of needles.”
    55. 55. A question for Yvonne? And so in spite of all those great outreach strategies, some people still hesitate to get vaccinated. What additional messages did you use in educating the public?
    56. 56. Educating the public about influenza Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. Influenza (the flu) can be a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Anyone can get sick from the flu. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.
    57. 57. Educating the public about influenza It takes about two weeks after vaccination for the body’s immune response to fully respond and for you to be protected. “It’s not too late to get vaccinated.” National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW) People have several options in terms of where they can get vaccinated and the type of influenza vaccine to choose. http://flushot.healthmap.org/ The best way to protect against the flu is by getting vaccinated each year.
    58. 58. 75034
    59. 59. Resources• Matte articles• PSA’s• Print Materials• Web Buttons, Banners, and Widgets
    60. 60. Cold vs fluInfluenza Symptoms: can be mild to severeThe flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feelsome or all of these symptoms:• Fever or feeling feverish/chills• Cough• Sore throat• Runny or stuffy nose• Muscle or body aches• Headaches• Fatigue (tiredness)• Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.
    61. 61. Educating the public about flu vaccine There are two reasons for getting a yearly flu vaccine: 1. Flu viruses are constantly changing, flu vaccines may be updated to protect against the viruses predicted to circulate the most during the coming flu season. 2. A person’s immune protection from vaccination declines over time and annual vaccination is needed for optimal protection. Each season many flu viruses spread but most of these viruses fall into four main categorized groups: two influenza A and 2 influenza B viruses. The 2012-2013 flu vaccine protects against the three influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the season. This includes an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and an influenza B virus. The timing of influenza outbreaks is unpredictable. They have occurred as early as October and as late as May.
    62. 62. Flu Season Communication Tactics Provide media, the public, clinicians, public health and other partners with rapid, accurate, transparent, clear, and actionable information on influenza disease activity, prevention, and treatment National press briefings: Flu season kick-off, NIVW Radio media tours with national, local and ethnic media outlets CDC Website traffic tripled in page views this flu season Maintain weekly e-mail distribution of updates, resources, key messages to public health providers, organizations, private sector partners and other stakeholders Web and social media activities Materials distribution and partner driven flu promotion activities
    63. 63. Resourceshttp://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/index.htm
    64. 64. 2013-2014 Flu Season Goals: Focus groups to test new logo and theme, quadrivalent vaccine message testing and fact sheets. Continue messaging that conveys importance of universal vaccination with a focus on people with high risk health conditions and health disparities. New materials to reach African American, Hispanics and American Indian/Alaska Native populations. National Influenza Vacccination Week- December 8-14, 2013
    65. 65. Thank you! Contact: fluinbox@cdc.gov For more information please contact Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30333Telephone: 1-800-CDC-INFO (232-4636)/TTY: 1-888-232-6348E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web: http://www.cdc.gov/flu
    66. 66. Key takeaways • Understanding perceived benefits and barriers to vaccination among target audiences is key in designing an effective campaign. • Partnerships and collaboration strategies can increase visibility and target audience reach. • Clear messages and materials + community engagement can build awareness about the importance and benefits of universal flu vaccination.
    67. 67. Poll QuestionIf I were trying to persuade someone to get a flu shot, I would: a) Tell them how many people die from flu every year b) Tell them about someone you know who got the flu c) Ask them if they know the difference between the cold and the flu
    68. 68. Join the Conversation! Questions or comments for Yvonne? Please submit questions by using the chat function OR clicking the “raise hand” button to be taken off mute We have our first question for Yvonne. . .
    69. 69. Discussion/Q&AAsk Yvonne!Share with Yvonne!
    70. 70. Join the Conversation! Questions or comments for either panelist? Please submit questions by using the chat function OR clicking the “raise hand” button to be taken off mute
    71. 71. Questions for our speakersMichael Villaire, MSLM Yvonne GarciaChief Operating Centers forOfficer, Institute for Disease Control &Healthcare Advancement Prevention (CDC)
    72. 72. Health Literacy:Undervalued byPublic Health?A tool for public healthprofessionals.Prepared for the American Public HealthAssociation Community Health Planning &Policy Development SectionTammy Pilisuk, MPH AUG 2011
    73. 73. Learning more. . .• Following today’s webinar, you will receive an email with a link to • A recording of today’s webinar, which will be archived for future access • Presenters’ slides • List of resources related to today’s topic
    74. 74. Evaluation & Questions• An evaluation will pop up on your screen immediately following the conclusion of today’s webinar ─ please share your feedback that will help us improve future webinars• Please let us know if you would like to follow-up on anything we touched on today• Have additional questions? Contact our presenters or moderator
    75. 75. Resources• CDC: Health Literacyhttp://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/index.html• National Institute For Literacy (NIFL) health literacy listserve: http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/discussions/subscribe_all.ht ml• American Medical Association’s health literacy site: http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/about-ama/our- people/affiliated-groups/ama-foundation/our- programs/public-health/health-literacy-program.shtml 81
    76. 76. Additional Resources• www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/etr.html• www.coveringkidsandfamilies.org/resources/docs/stylemanual.pdf• www.health.gov/healthliteracyonline• www.cdc.gov/healthmarketing/pdf/Simply_Put_082010.pdf• www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy/resources/doak-book• www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy/practice/additional- resources-for-creating-and-assessing-materials• www.healthcommunications.org/resources/Improving%20Readabil ity%20with%20Appropriate%20Design.pdf• www.slideshare.net/SPHCalpact/plain-writing-training-tool
    77. 77. Speaker Contact InformationMichael Villaire, MSLM, Chief Operating OfficerInstitute for Healthcare Advancementmvillaire@iha4health.org(800) 434-4633 x202Yvonne Garcia, Influenza Communication LeadHealth Communications SpecialistCDC/NCIRDybg2@cdc.gov
    78. 78. Thank you to our Sponsors Community Health Planning and Policy Development Section, APHA
    79. 79. Thank you to our planning committee• Tammy Pilisuk, MPH, APHA-CHPPD• Erin Brigham, MPH, CareSource, APHA-CHPPD• Amanda Crowe, MA, MPH, Impact Health Communications, LLC• Meghan Bridgid Moran, PhD, San Diego State University, School of Communications• Nancy Murphy, MSHC, Metropolitan Group
    80. 80. Thank you to our speakers!Michael Yvonne GarciaVillaire, MSLM, Institute for Centers forHealthcare Advancement Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)
    81. 81. About This Series• The Health Communication Matters series will help participants in all walks of public health to apply health literacy principles to their everyday communications.• What audiences do you communicate with—consumers, health professionals, disenfranchised communities, your public health peers? Whatever your role in public health, it’s likely that you need to communicate effectively. But how do you know your communication is effective?• Only about 10 percent of the general population is considered “health literate.” That leaves the vast majority of us with barriers to understanding the health-related information we read.
    82. 82. Conclusion Thank you!www.calpact.org

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