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SPCA MAUI: Saving Mau'is Animals - A New Perspective entire presentation
 

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Presentation from the SPCA MAUI on "Saving Maui's Animals: A New Perspective." This includes the presentation from all four speakers from our launch event.

Presentation from the SPCA MAUI on "Saving Maui's Animals: A New Perspective." This includes the presentation from all four speakers from our launch event.

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  • Our missionWho we areWhy we were formed
  • Thank you VetsOther non profits
  • "No More Homeless Pets"The Maui SPCA was formed in 2010 with a desire to stop the killing of companion, including feral populations, as a means of population control and to nurture a Maui with “no more homeless pets”. So why have we formed now?
  • decreasing aggression toward other animals, preventing behavior problems, reducing the animal's chance of getting cancer, increasing life expectancy, reducing the incidence of injury and disease, reducing the urge to roam, and decreasing the incidence of fighting. And it'll save you money, too.in decreased license fees and fewer veterinary bills.“A spayed or neutered animal has a tendency to gain weight due to a decreased metabolic rate (however, this should save you money because you should feed him/her less). FCC note: This point should be of interest to those concerned about feral predation.” 1997 David W. Zanders, DVM San Diego California Feral Cat Coalition
  • decreasing aggression toward other animals, preventing behavior problems, reducing the animal's chance of getting cancer, increasing life expectancy, reducing the incidence of injury and disease, reducing the urge to roam, and decreasing the incidence of fighting. And it'll save you money, too.in decreased license fees and fewer veterinary bills.“A spayed or neutered animal has a tendency to gain weight due to a decreased metabolic rate (however, this should save you money because you should feed him/her less). FCC note: This point should be of interest to those concerned about feral predation.” 1997 David W. Zanders, DVM San Diego California Feral Cat Coalition
  • decreasing aggression toward other animals, preventing behavior problems, reducing the animal's chance of getting cancer, increasing life expectancy, reducing the incidence of injury and disease, reducing the urge to roam, and decreasing the incidence of fighting. And it'll save you money, too.in decreased license fees and fewer veterinary bills.“A spayed or neutered animal has a tendency to gain weight due to a decreased metabolic rate (however, this should save you money because you should feed him/her less). FCC note: This point should be of interest to those concerned about feral predation.” 1997 David W. Zanders, DVM San Diego California Feral Cat Coalition
  • decreasing aggression toward other animals, preventing behavior problems, reducing the animal's chance of getting cancer, increasing life expectancy, reducing the incidence of injury and disease, reducing the urge to roam, and decreasing the incidence of fighting. And it'll save you money, too.in decreased license fees and fewer veterinary bills.“A spayed or neutered animal has a tendency to gain weight due to a decreased metabolic rate (however, this should save you money because you should feed him/her less). FCC note: This point should be of interest to those concerned about feral predation.” 1997 David W. Zanders, DVM San Diego California Feral Cat Coalition
  • Our missionWho we areWhy we were formed
  • Our missionWho we areWhy we were formed

SPCA MAUI: Saving Mau'is Animals - A New Perspective entire presentation SPCA MAUI: Saving Mau'is Animals - A New Perspective entire presentation Presentation Transcript

  • “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated”
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “Man did not weave the web of life, he is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself." — Chief Seattle
  • Educational & Awareness Series
    Presentation I:Savings Maui’s Animals: A New Perspective
  • SPCA MAUIWelcomes You!
  • We wish to thank our event sponsors and our special guests.
  • Here is today’s agenda.
    Intro to SPCA MAUILeili McKinley SPCA Maui Board member
    Health Benefits of Spay & Neuter Dr. Alan Kaufman Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
    The Impact of Spay and Neuter on Reducing Aggression, Population, & SufferingAimee Anderson SPCA Maui Board Member & Former Director of Animal Control for Maui Humane Society & Maui Police Department Instructor
    Reducing animal cruelty on MauiJudge Simone C. Polak Department ofThe Prosecuting Attorney
  • We are SPCA Maui.
    Our mission:
    "No More Homeless Pets"
    The immediate vision of the SPCA Maui is to provide education for pet lovers & convenient & affordable spay/neuter
    services to all.
    Establish a state of the art Veterinary mobile clinic (bus) to provide on site spay/neuter
    Provide low/no cost spay/neuter education & services through our Veterinary network
    Our Vision: Step One Step Two
    Why we were formed now?
  • Maui is facing an animal population crisis.
    There is growing companion animal Overpopulation.
    Current animal management resources are inadequate to solve Maui’s challenges.
  • Kill/adopt ratios @ MHS demonstrate the problem.
    723
    787
    774
    4505
    51% Kill to Adoption Ratio
    81% Kill to Adoption Ratio
    2009 Sample Data provided by County of Maui Department of Housing and Human Concerns
  • The number of dogs & cats killed at Maui’s shelter in the last 5 years is tragic.
    2005
    2006
    2007
    2008
    2009
    2010
    1,094
    955
    710
    787
    1,125
    +
    +
    +
    +
    +
    3,862
    4,617
    3,879
    4,505
    3,597
    30,389
    *5,258
    =
    Total #
    4,956
    5,572
    4,589
    5,292
    4,722
    * Total number confirmed by MHS (breakdown temporarily unavailable)
  • Maui’s situation compared to the national average tells the story.
    *National Average based on Salt Lake County’s National Survey Results
    ** 2010 Data provided by County of Maui Department of Housing and Human Concerns
  • Why are Maui’s animal numbers so high?
    1 Female dog (our little Hoku) has2 litters per Year. With 4 puppies Per Litter.
    She does this for 6 years.
    If each puppy born during 6 years had 4 puppies of their own.
    How many puppies will have been born in 6 years?
    Hoku
    67,000
    Data provided by The Humane Society of The United States
  • Scientific research supports spay/neuter for animal control.
    “Nationwide the per capita shelter intake and euthanasia have been in steady decline…research indicates that the main reason for this decline is that increase incidence of spayed and neutered animals in the pet population.”
    (Zawistowski et al., 1998;Irwin,2001; Clancy & rowan,2003)
  • The veterinary community endorse spay/neuter to endtragedy of mass animal kills.
    “[Sterilization is] the best antidote to the mass euthanasia of cats and dogs resulting from overpopulation.”
    (Looney et al.,2008 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association)
  • Animal overpopulation negatively effects our communities.
    Unmanaged cat colonies:
    Spread animal diseases
    Lead to animal objectification & cruelty
    Causes tension among neighbors
    Stray or unmanaged dogs:
    Cause property damage
    Kill other companion animals & livestock
    Pose a threat to humans
  • Overpopulation creates financial burden.
    Maui County Government will spend a projected $1.2 million this year on animal management.
    Including private efforts, our community will spend over $ 2 Million this coming year for animal management.
    Additionally, volunteer individuals spend untold amounts feeding local colonies.
  • Presentation 1.2Savings Maui’s Animals: A New Perspective
    Intro to SPCA MAUILeili McKinley MSPCA Board member
    Health Benefits of Spay & Neuter Dr. Alan Kaufman Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
    Health Benefits of Spay & Neuter Dr. Alan Kaufman Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
    Aardvarks to Zebras, Inc.
    Reducing animal cruelty in MauiSimone C. Polak Maui County Chief Prosecuting Attorney
  • Presentation 1.3Savings Maui’s Animals: A New Perspective
    Intro to SPCA MAUILeili McKinley MSPCA Board member
    Health Benefits of Spay & Neuter Dr. Alan Kaufman Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
    The Impact of Spay and Neuter onReducing Aggression, Population,& Suffering
    Aimee AndersonSPCA Maui Board Member & Former Director of Animal Control for Maui Humane Society & Maui Police Department Instructor
    Reducing animal cruelty in MauiSimone C. Polak Maui County Chief Prosecuting Attorney
  • This is a dog with mange.
    Researchers believe the tendency to develop demodectic mange is hereditary.
  • Spay/Neuter can reduce the incidence of demodectic mange.
    It is very important that dogs with a history of generalized demodectic mange not be bred as there is thought to be a hereditary component to the development of the disease.
  • Non-neutered dogs are more aggressive.
    Approximately 75% of reported dog bites involve intact male dogs.
  • The number of dog bites in the U.S. are dramatic.
    According to recent surveys, 4.8 million people are bitten by dogs each year in the United States. 1,000 Americans per day are treated in emergency rooms as a result of dog bites.
  • The majority of dog bite victims are children.
  • “Free to Good Home” is a recipe for disaster.
    “Free pets" are often a result of "mistake" breeding.
    Pets obtained for free are less likely to be spay/neuter & are less likely to receive veterinary care.
    They are more likely to be abused, neglected or discarded.
    Animal hoarders often search for "Free to Good Home“ ads thinking they are rescuing an animal.
    Free pets often end up in the hands of dog fighters who use them to "bait" to train fighting dogs. They may end up as breeding stock for a backyard breeder.
  • “Free to Good Home” pets can end up like this.
  • Other species can become victims too.
  • With excess, even living feeling animals become disposable objects.
    When there is an excess of a commodity, that commodity loses its value and importance. It becomes something to be dismissed or ignored. At worse, it can become disposable or even despised. Unfortunately, society views excess animals as one of those "disposable" commodities.
  • This is a perfect example of the disposable mentality.
  • Both dog fighting and neglect are symptoms of the devaluation of life.
  • This island has seen way too much of this kind of abuse.
  • Presentation 1.4Savings Maui’s Animals: A New Perspective
    Intro to SPCA MAUILeili McKinley MSPCA Board member
    Health Benefits of Spay & Neuter Dr. Alan Kaufman Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
    Reducing animal cruelty on MauiJudge Simone C. Polak Maui County Deputy Prosecuting Attorney
    Reducing animal cruelty in MauiSimone C. Polak Maui County Chief Prosecuting Attorney
  • REDUCING CRUELTY TO ANIMALS ON MAUI
    SOCIETAL IMPLICATIONS OF ANIMAL ABUSE &
    HOW YOU CAN BE PART OF THE SOLUTION !
    By
    Simone C. Polak
  • CONTACT INFORMATION
    SIMONE C. POLAK
    DEPUTY PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
    DEPARTMENT OF THE PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
    150 S. HIGH STREET
    WAILUKU, HI 96793
    PHONE: 808-270-7630
    E-MAIL: SIMONE.POLAK@CO.MAUI.HI.US
  • GOALS OF MY PRESENTATION
    TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THE LINKS BETWEEN ANIMAL ABUSE, CHILD ABUSE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE .
    TO BECOME FAMILIAR WITH SOME OF THE ANIMAL CRUELTY LAWS AND DEFINITIONS IN HAWAII.
    TO LEARN HOW YOU CAN BE AN EFFECTIVE REPORTER/WITNESS OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS OR NEGLECT.
  • AWARENESS OF THE “LINKS”
    Research over the past 25 years, primarily in the United States and Canada, has examined the possible connection between child abuse and animal abuse.
    Today, research and clinical evidence suggest that there are sometimes inter-relationships, aptly referred to as ‘links’, between the abuse of children, vulnerable adults, and animals.
    From this research, four (4) dominant and interrelated theses have emerged, three (3) demonstrating negative, problematic links and one (1) a positive, healing link.
  • THE IDENTIFIED LINKS
    1) Animal Abuse as part of the continuum of abuse within the family.
    2) Animal Abuse perpetrated by children who later show aggressive and deviant behavior.
    3) Animal Abuse as an indicator of the presence of child abuse, and
    4) The therapeutic potential of animals in child development and within post-abuse work.
    (Becker & French, 2004)
  • THE IDENTIFIED LINKS
  • CONTINUUM OF ABUSE IN FAMILY
    ABUSE OF FAMILY OR
    HOUSEHOLD MEMBER
    CHILD ABUSES ANIMAL, DUE ABUSER ALSO TO INABILITY TO PROTECT ABUSES ANIMAL
    SELF OR OTHERS FROM
    FROM ABUSER
    ANIMAL ABUSE
  • ANIMAL ABUSE COMMITTED BY CHILDREN WHO LATER SHOW AGGRESSIVE, DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
    SOME FAMOUS EXAMPLES
    Ted Bundy - convicted of two Murders, suspected of at least forty! Bundy used to watch as his father torture animals. Eventually, he did the same.(PETA, Animal Abuse & Human Abuse)
    Photo retrieved from
    http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/publications/ten-most-wanted-fugitives-60th-anniversary-1950-2010/famous_cases on 1/11/11.
  • ANIMAL ABUSE COMMITTED BY CHILDREN WHO LATER SHOW AGGRESSIVE, DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
    Jeffrey Dahmer showed an intense interest in dismembering animals as a child. As an adult, he was charged with murdering and dismembering at least sixteen people.
    (PETA, Animal Abuse & Human Abuse)
    Photo retrieved from http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/notorious/dahmer/14.html on 1/11/11
  • ANIMAL ABUSE COMMITTED BY CHILDREN WHO LATER SHOW AGGRESSIVE, DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
    David Berkowitz was convicted of thirteen murders and attempted murders. He used to abuse the neighborhood dogs. He shot one neighbors dog because the dog was an "evil force" that compelled him to kill.
    (PETA, Animal Abuse & Human Abuse)
    Photo retrieved from http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/notorious/berkowitz/10.html on 1/11/11.
  • ANIMAL ABUSE COMMITTED BY CHILDREN WHO LATER SHOW AGGRESSIVE, DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
    Edward Kemper - convicted of killing eight women, including his own mother. At thirteen, he killed neighborhood cats and put their heads on poles. Kemper killed his own cat, decapitated it and cut it into small pieces. This is the same thing he did to his mother!
    (TRUtv, Kemper)
    Photo retrieved from http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/predators/kemper/childhood_2.html
  • ANIMAL ABUSE COMMITTED BY CHILDREN WHO LATER SHOW AGGRESSIVE, DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
    Andrew Cunanan - killed designer Versace, was suspected in the five other murders. He would gather crabs from tide pools, and
    burn their eyes out with a lighted match, then release them. (Ascione &Arkow, 1999)
    Photo retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov/wanted/topten/topten-history/hires_images/FBI-449-AndrewPhillipCunanan.jpg on 1/11/11
  • ANIMAL ABUSE AS AN INDICATOR OF THE PRESENCE OF CHILD ABUSE
    88% of families known to child protection authorities also abused animals. (DeVinney et al. ,1983)
    A study done by North Eastern University and the Massachusetts SPCA found that people who abuse animals are five times more likely to commit violent crimes against humans than people who do not. (PETA ,Animal Abuse & Human Abuse)
  • DEFINITIONS - HRS §710-1100
    “Animal” includes every living creature, except a human being.
    “Pet animal” means a dog, cat, domesticated rabbit, guinea pig, domesticated pig, or caged birds… so long as not bred for consumption.
    “Equine animal” means an animal of or belonging to the family Equidae, including horses, ponies, mules, donkeys, asses, burros, and zebras.
  • DEFINITIONS - HRS §710-1100
    “Primary pet enclosure” means any kennel, cage, or structure used to restrict only a pet animal as defined in this section to a limited area of space, and does not apply to the confinement of any animals that are raised for food, such as any poultry that is raised for meat or egg production and livestock, rabbits, or pigs that are raised specifically for meat production because these animals are not pets when raised for meat or egg production.
  • DEFINITIONS - HRS §710-1100
    “Necessary sustenance” means care sufficient to preserve the health and well-being of a pet animal, except for emergencies or circumstances beyond the reasonable control of the owner or caretaker of the pet animal, and includes but is not limited to the following requirements:
    (1) Food of sufficient quantity and quality to allow for normal growth or maintenance of body weight;
    (2) Open or adequate access to water in sufficient quantity and quality to satisfy the animal's needs;
  • DEFINITIONS - HRS §710-1100
    (3) Access to protection from wind, rain, or sun;
    (4) An area of confinement that has adequate space necessary for the health of the animal and is kept reasonably clean and free from excess waste or other contaminants that could affect the animal's health; provided that the area of confinement in a primary pet enclosure must:
  • DEFINITIONS - HRS §710-1100
    (A) Provide access to shelter;
    (B) Be constructed of safe materials to protect the pet animal from injury;
    (C) Enable the pet animal to be clean, dry, and free from excess waste or other contaminants that could affect the pet animal's health;
    (D) Provide the pet animal with a solid surface or resting platform that is large enough for the pet animal to lie upon in a normal manner, or, in the case of a caged bird a perch that is large enough for the bird to perch upon in a normal manner;
  • DEFINITIONS - HRS §710-1100
    (E) Provide sufficient space to allow the pet animal to, at minimum, do the following:
    (i) Easily stand, sit, lie, turn around, and make all other normal body movements in a comfortable manner for the pet animal, without making physical contact with any other animal in the enclosure; and
    (ii) Interact safely with other animals within the enclosure; and
    (5) Veterinary care when needed to prevent suffering.
    These requirements are minimal standards of care for pet animals.
  • DEFINITIONS - HRS §710-1100
    “Torment” means fail to attempt to mitigate substantial bodily injury with respect to a person who has a duty of care to the animal.
    “Torture” includes every act, omission, or neglect whereby unjustifiable physical pain, suffering, or death is caused or permitted.
    Note: Although the statutes are entitled Cruelty to Animals, the term “Cruelty” was specifically removed from the definition section.
  • THE LAW - CHAPTER 711 OF THE HAWAII REVISED STATUTES
    OFFENSES AGAINST PUBLIC ORDER:
    CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE FIRST DEGREE, HRS 711-1108.5 (Class C Felony)
    CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE SECOND DEGREE, HRS 711-1109 (MD)
    CRUELTY TO ANIMALS;FIGHTING DOGS, HRS 711-1109.3 (Class C Felony)
    ANIMAL HOARDING, HRS 711-1109.6 (MD)
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE FIRST DEGREE, HRS §711-1108.5 (ACT 114 - Felony)
    In 2007, Act 114 strengthened Hawaii's animal cruelty laws, by elevating certain abuse to pet animals to a felony level, in part due to Porky, Kipu, and Gonzo, who were all beloved pet pigs, killed by people who trespassed onto private property. (KHNL News 8, 2007)
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE FIRST DEGREE, HRS §711-1108.5 (ACT 114 - Felony)
    The (Hawai’i) legislature found that violence, whether against humans or animals, must be not tolerated in our society. Evidence suggests a link between animal abuse and the commission of violent acts against humans. Hawaii is only one of nine states in the United States without a felony offense for domestic animal abuse.
    (Supplemental Commentary on HRS §711-1100)
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE FIRST DEGREE, HRS §711-1108.5 (ACT 114 - Felony)
    The legislature also found that pet animals provide a close emotional bond and relationship with their owners and family members and friends. Violence and harm committed against the animals have a significant emotional impact on their owners and family.
    (Supplemental Commentary on HRS §711-1100)
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE FIRST DEGREE, HRS §711-1108.5 (ACT 114 - Felony)
    (1) A person commits the offense of cruelty to animals in the first degree if the person intentionally or knowingly tortures, mutilates, or poisons or causes the torture, mutilation, or poisoning of any pet animal or equine animal resulting in serious bodily injury or death of the pet animal or equine animal.
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE FIRST DEGREE, HRS §711-1108.5 (ACT 114 - Felony)
    Punishment:
    5 years prison and/or $10,000.00 fine or 5 years probation with reasonable conditions, including up to 1 year in jail.
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE FIRST DEGREE, HRS §711-1108.5 – NOT APPLICABLE TO:
    (a) Accepted veterinary practices;
    (b) Activities carried on for scientific research governed by standards of accepted educational or medicinal practices; or
    (c) Cropping or docking as customarily practiced.
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE FIRST DEGREE, HRS §711-1108.5 – NOT APPLICABLE TO:
    (3) Whenever any pet animal or equine animal is so severely injured that there is no reasonable probability that its life can be saved, the animal may be immediately destroyed without creating any offense under this section.
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE SECOND DEGREE, HRS 711-1109 (MD)
    (1) A person commits the offense of cruelty to animals in the second degree if the person intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly:
    (a) Overdrives, overloads, tortures, torments, beats, causes substantial bodily injury, or starves any animal, or causes the overdriving, overloading, torture, torment, beating, or starving of any animal;
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE SECOND DEGREE, HRS 711-1109 (MD)
    (b) Deprives a pet animal of necessary sustenance or causes such deprivation;
    (c) Mutilates, poisons, or kills without need any animal other than insects, vermin, or other pests;
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE SECOND DEGREE, HRS 711-1109 (MD)
    (d) Keeps, uses, or in any way is connected with or interested in the management of, or receives money for the admission of any person to, any place kept or used for the purpose of fighting or baiting any bull, bear, cock, or other animal, and includes every person who encourages, aids, or assists therein, or who permits or suffers any place to be so kept or used;
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE SECOND DEGREE, HRS 711-1109 (MD)
    (e) Carries or causes to be carried, in or upon any vehicle or other conveyance, any animal in a cruel or inhumane manner;
    (f) Confines or causes to be confined, in a kennel or cage, any pet animal in a cruel or inhumane manner;
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS IN THE SECOND DEGREE, HRS 711-1109 (MD)
    (g) Tethers, fastens, ties, or restrains a dog to a dog house, tree, fence, or any other stationary object by means of a choke collar, pinch collar, or prong collar; provided that a person is not prohibited from using such restraints when walking a dog with a hand-held leash or while a dog is engaged in a supervised activity; or (h) Assists another in the commission of any act specified in subsections (1)(a) through (1)(g).
  • DIFFERENCES BETWEEN C FELONY AND MD CRUELTY STATUTE
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS;FIGHTING DOGS, HRS §711-1109.3 (C FELONY)
    1) A person commits the offense of cruelty to animals if the person:
    (a) Owns or trains any dog with the intent that such dog shall be engaged in an exhibition of fighting with another dog;
  • CRUELTY TO ANIMALS;FIGHTING DOGS, HRS §711-1109.3 (C FELONY)
    (b) For amusement or gain, intentionally causes any dog to fight with another dog, or causes any dog to injure another dog; or
    (c) Knowingly or recklessly permits any act in violation of paragraph (a) or (b) to be done on the premises under the person's charge or control, or aids or abets any such act.
  • ANIMAL HOARDING, HRS 711-1109.6 (MD)
    (1) A person commits the offense of animal hoarding if the person intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly:
    (a) Possesses more than fifteen dogs, cats, or a combination of dogs and cats;(b) Fails to provide necessary sustenance for each dog or cat; and
  • ANIMAL HOARDING, HRS 711-1109.6 (MD)
    (c) Fails to correct the conditions under which the dogs or cats are living, where conditions injurious to the dogs', cats', or owner's health and well-being result from the person's failure to provide necessary sustenance.
  • INCLUSION OF ANIMALS IN PROTECTIVE ORDERS – HRS §586-4
    Aside from stronger cruelty laws, another positive development for the protection of animals (and victims of domestic violence), surely in part due to the recognition of the link between animal abuse and domestic violence, the Hawai’i legislature passed an amendment in 2009, to the law regarding TROs (temporary restraining orders) which was changed to allow for the inclusion of animals in protective orders.
  • INCLUSION OF ANIMALS IN PROTECTIVE ORDERS – HRS §586-4
    The amendment provides:
    The family court “may also enjoin or restrain both of the parties from taking, concealing, removing, threatening, physically abusing, or otherwise disposing of any animal identified to the court as belonging to a household,“ which is important because:
  • IMPORTANCE OF INCLUSION OF ANIMALS IN PROTECTIVE ORDERS
    1) The statute recognizes the link by allowing petitioners and courts to include pets from threats of abuse and actual harm.
    2) It is more likely that an abused adult and/or child will remain free from their abuser, and not return to the abusive home, if their pet is also safe.
    3) Keeping pets safe allows the pet to continue to be a source of comfort for adult and child victims of family violence.
    4) Children will become desensitized to violence toward pets over time and, therefore, stopping the cycle of violence reduces the likelihood that children in the home will replicate violence in the future.
    (The Few, the Proud - The Prosecutor, July 2006)
  • PROTECTIVE ORDERS AND DOMESTICVIOLENCE SHELTER
    Domestic Violence Shelters cannot take pets (ordinarily).
    Per Stacey Moniz, Executive Director of Women helping Women here on Maui, they will work with each individual to remove the pet from danger, keep it with the family, or find a temporary animal foster placement.
  • REPORTING CRUELTY
    How will I recognize cruelty?
    What if I am wrong?
    In Jacobellis v. Ohio, 378 US 184 (1964), a case addressing the issue of what is obscenity, Justice Potter Stewart famously coined this phrase: “I know it when I see it….”
    If you see something that makes you think is cruel or improper, neglectful or harmful to a pet or any animal, err on the side of caution – MAKE A REPORT.
    Listen to your instincts!
  • REPORTING CRUELTY
    You need to report as much information as possible, including the following:
    WHERE, WHAT, WHEN, WHO, AND HOW
    WHERE:Give a street address if possible, including cross streets, if unknown/no address, describe the house/apt/building in detail, ie, third house from XYZ Street, makai side, white with brown trim, with an old red Ford truck parked on grass.
  • REPORTING CRUELTY
    WHAT: is going on that made you call. Describe what you saw, heard, felt, smelled, include information about the physical condition of the animal. Be specific about any acts that were committed against the animal. Describe the animal’s reaction – crying, “screaming,” wincing, whining, cowering, etc.
  • REPORTING CRUELTY
    WHEN: did the incident occur. Give the date and time. If it is happening as you call, make sure you continue reporting what is going on.
    If you can, video or audio record what is going on with your cell/smart phone. Take photos!
  • WHO: is committing the offense. Give the name and description (height, weight, build, hair, eyes, tattoos, piercings, glasses, clothing, of the person or persons, any name they were called by others involved, car and license plate number. Note the presences of other witnesses, and children, visible or not, and report that as well!
  • REPORTING CRUELTY
    HOW: Be specific on how the offense is being committed. Under the excitement of an event, we tend to be conclusionary: “He is abusing the dog.” But what does abuse mean?
    Compare: He has an aluminum baseball bat, the dog is tied up on a heavy chain, he hit the dog at least 10x with the bat and he keeps hitting the dog, he swings with a full swing and when the bat connects, I can hear a “thump” and then the dog winces and “cries.” There is blood running down the dog’s face and nose. He also kicked the dog with steel toe boots in the rear right leg and the dog is limping.
  • REPORTING CRUELTY
    Ask other witnesses to also report.
    Even if others say they will make a report, don’t rely on that, make your own report.
    Do not wait until an animal's life is in danger.
    If you hear, see, smell, anything strange, or unusual, write it down, describe it, document it for yourself, so if matters become more clear, you will be able to share that information with the police, animal control, or child protective services.
  • REPORTING CRUELTY
    Write down the events that you observed in great detail. All cases benefit from details.
    When you write details, you will be able to remember things much later, if need be.
    Make a note of who you called (get names, Id numbers#, badge numbers, Operator numbers, etc.) and who you spoke with subsequently.
    Call to find out what happened to the case.
  • LEAVE YOU WITH THIS QUOTE
    "Anyone who has accustomed himself to regard the life of any living creature as worthless, is in danger of arriving also at the idea of worthless human lives.“
    ~Dr. Albert Schweitzer~
  • So what can we do to help?
  • We can build the bus.
    Bring Accessible & Affordable Spay/Neuter Services all over the island
    A co-operative mobile clinic to serve all:
    • Individuals
    • For profit
    • Non profit
  • Our bus can make Maui a better place for all.
    Decrease Euthanasia in Shelters
    Reduce Unwanted, Stray and Feral Animals
    Protect Our Environment
    Reduce Abandonment, Mistreatment & Cruelty
  • Please help us help them
    We need to raise $150,000 for the mobile spay/neuter bus
  • REFERENCES
    Ascione, F. R. & Arkow, P. (eds.) Child Abuse, Domestic Violence and Animal Abuse, p. 6, (Purdue Research Foundation 1999)
    Elizabeth Deviney et al., “The Care of Pets Within Child Abusing Families,” International Journal for the Study of Animal Problems 4 (1983): 321-9.
  • REFERENCES
    http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/notorious/berkowitz/22.html
    http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/predators/kemper/sara_7.html
    http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=208656,Becker, F. & French, L., Making the Links: Child Abuse, Animal Cruelty, and, Domestic Violence, Child Abuse Review, Vol. 13, 6:399-414 (December 2004)
    NSPCC, Understanding the Links: Child Abuse, Animal Abuse and Domestic Violence, [Electronic version], retrieved from www.nspcc.org.uk/inform on 1/12/11.
  • REFERENCES
    PETA, Animal Abuse & Human Abuse: Partners in Crime, Information for Prosecutors, Judges, and Law Enforcement Officers, Electronic version, retrieved from http://www.peta.org/issues/Companion-Animals/animal-abuse-and-human-abuse-partners-in-crime.aspx on 1/12/11.
    Phillips, A., The Few and the Proud: Prosecutors Who Vigorously Pursue Animal Cruelty Cases, The Prosecutor, 42:20, July 2008.