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HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
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HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
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HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
HazMat Ch07
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HazMat Ch07

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  • Image: Courtesy of The DuPont Company
  • Image: © Photodisc
  • Image: Image © Lakeland Industries, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Image: Courtesy of The DuPont Company
  • Image: Courtesy of OccuNomix International, LLC
  • Image: Courtesy of DS Kool
  • Image: Courtesy of Glacier Tek, Inc.
  • Transcript

    • 1. 7Mission-SpecificCompetencies: Personal Protective Equipment
    • 2. 7 Objectives (1 of 3)• Describe personal protective equipment (PPE) for hazardous materials incidents• Describe the capabilities of the PPE provided by the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) so as to perform any mission-specific tasks assigned
    • 3. 7 Objectives (2 of 3)• Describe how to don, work in, and doff the PPE provided by the AHJ• Describe PPE performance requirements• Describe ways to ensure that personnel do not go beyond their level of training and equipment
    • 4. 7 Objectives (3 of 3)• Describe cooling technologies• Terminate the incident by completing the reports and documentation pertaining to PPE
    • 5. 7 Selecting Personal Protective Equipment• Use risk-based approach in selecting• Disposable, single, or limited use• Reusable – Need testing at regular intervals – Store in cool, dry place
    • 6. 7 TRACEMP (1 of 2)• Acronym for potential responder hazards – Thermal – Radiological – Asphyxiating – Chemical
    • 7. 7 TRACEMP (2 of 2)– Etiological/biological– Mechanical– Psychogenic
    • 8. 7Street Clothing and Work Uniforms (1 of 2)• Least protection• Nomex flame-resistant jumpsuit
    • 9. 7Street Clothing and Work Uniforms (2 of 2) A Nomex jumpsuit.
    • 10. 7 Structural Firefighting Protective Equipment (1 of 3)• Includes: – Helmet – Bunker coat – Bunker pants – Boots – Gloves
    • 11. 7 Structural Firefighting Protective Equipment (2 of 3)• Includes: – Hood – SCBA – Personal alert safety system (PASS) device
    • 12. 7 Structural Firefighting Protective Equipment (3 of 3)Standard turnout gear or structural firefighting gear.
    • 13. 7 High Temperature–Protective Equipment (1 of 2)• Protects for short exposure• Does not protect from hazardous materials
    • 14. 7 High Temperature–Protective Equipment (2 of 2) High temperature–protective equipment protects thewearer from high temperatures during a short exposure.
    • 15. 7 Chemical-Protective Clothing (1 of 2)• Compatibility charts – Help choose right clothing for incident• Chemical-resistant materials resist: – Penetration – Permeation – Degradation
    • 16. 7 Chemical-Protective Clothing (2 of 2)• May be single- or multi-piece garment• Two main kinds: – Vapor-protective clothing – Liquid splash–protective clothing
    • 17. 7 Vapor-Protective Clothing (1 of 2)• Full body protection• Used for highly contaminated environments• Requires SCBA
    • 18. 7 Vapor-Protective Clothing (2 of 2)Vapor-protective clothing retains body heat, so it also increasesthe possibility of heat-related emergencies among responders.
    • 19. 7 Liquid Splash–Protective Clothing (1 of 2)• Protects wearer from chemical splashes• Does not protect from gases and vapors
    • 20. 7Liquid Splash–Protective Clothing (2 of 2) Liquid splash–protective clothing must be worn whenever there is the danger of chemical splashes.
    • 21. 7 Respiratory Protection• SCBA – 30-minute units – 60-minute units• Required by law in contaminated environments
    • 22. 7 Level A Ensemble (1 of 2)• Fully encapsulating garment• Encloses wearer and the respiratory protection• Protects against only brief flash fire• Affords alpha radiation protection
    • 23. 7 Level A Ensemble (2 of 2)A Level A ensemble envelops the wearer in a totally encapsulating suit.
    • 24. 7 Level B Ensemble (1 of 3)• Common level of protection, often chosen for its versatility• Chemical protective: – Clothing – Boots – Gloves – SCBA
    • 25. 7 Level B Ensemble (2 of 3)• High level of respiratory protection• Less skin protection• Little or no flash fire protection
    • 26. 7 Level B Ensemble (3 of 3)A Level B protective ensemble provides a high level of respiratory protection but less skin protection.
    • 27. 7 Level C Ensemble (1 of 3)• Appropriate when airborne contaminant is known• Worn in long-duration, low-hazard situations
    • 28. 7 Level C Ensemble (2 of 3)• Consists of: – Standard work clothing – Chemical-protective clothing – Chemical-resistant gloves – Respiratory protection other than SCBA/SAR
    • 29. 7 Level C Ensemble (3 of 3)Level C protective ensemble includes chemical-protective clothing and gloves as well as respiratory protection.
    • 30. 7 Level D Ensemble (1 of 2)• Work uniform that includes coveralls• Provides minimal protection
    • 31. 7 Level D Ensemble (2 of 2)A Level D protective ensemble is primarily a work uniform that includes coveralls and provides minimal protection.
    • 32. 7 Equipment Performance• Garments will withstand reasonable insults• Not “bulletproof”• Read manufacturer’s specifications
    • 33. 7 Responder Safety (1 of 3)• Issues can arise from wearing PPE – Heat exhaustion – Heat cramps – Heat stroke• All are preceded by dehydration
    • 34. 7 Responder Safety (2 of 3)• Field of vision is compromised – Can result in slips and falls – Face piece fogs up• Bulky PPE inhibits mobility• Gloves become slippery
    • 35. 7 Responder Safety (3 of 3)• Safety procedures include: – Pre-entry medical monitoring – Use of buddy system – Radio communication – Hand signals
    • 36. 7 Heat Exchange Units• Forced-air cooling systems• Ice-cooled or gel-packed vests• Fluid-chilled systems• Phase-change cooling technology
    • 37. 7 Forced-Air Cooling Systems• Force prechilled air through a system of hoses worn close to the body• Lightweight, provide long-term cooling benefits• Inhibit mobility (attached to external, fixed compressor)
    • 38. 7 Ice-Cooled or Gel-Packed Vests (1 of 2)• Low cost• Portable• Packs can be “recharged” (refrozen)• Bulky• May fool body into retaining heat
    • 39. 7Ice-Cooled or Gel-Packed Vests (2 of 2) Ice-cooled system.
    • 40. 7 Fluid-Chilled Systems (1 of 2)• Pump ice-chilled liquid through tubes• May limit mobility• Additional weight can increase workload and generate more heat
    • 41. 7Fluid-Chilled Systems (2 of 2) A fluid-chilled or water-cooled system.
    • 42. 7Phase-Change Cooling Technology (1 of 2)• Temperature of material is chilled to 60°F• Fabric wicks away perspiration• “Recharges” more quickly than gel-packed vest
    • 43. 7Phase-Change Cooling Technology (2 of 2) Phase-change cooling technology.
    • 44. 7 Reporting and Documenting Incidents• Important part of response• Correlated with how well organized response was• Formal accounts of event• Exposure records
    • 45. 7 Summary (1 of 3)• Use risk-based approach in selecting PPE• Follow policies of local jurisdiction• Chemical-protective clothing includes vapor-protective and liquid splash−protective clothing
    • 46. 7 Summary (2 of 3)• NFPA 1994 covers garment and respiratory protection• Levels A is required when environment exceeds IDLH values for skin absorption• Level B is minimum when operating in unknown environment• Level C is appropriate when the type of airborne substance is unknown, concentration is measured and criteria for APR’s are met
    • 47. 7 Summary (3 of 3)• PPE may cause heat-related maladies• Cooling technology under garment may help• Follow manufacturer’s guidelines• Written accounts of event and exposure records needed

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