2Hazardous Materials: Propertiesand Effects
2             Objectives (1 of 7)• Describe the following properties:  – Boiling point  – Chemical reactivity  – Corrosivi...
2           Objectives (2 of 7)– Ignition (autoignition) temperature– Particle size– Persistence– Physical state (solid, l...
2          Objectives (3 of 7)– Toxic products of combustion– Vapor density– Vapor pressure– Water solubility– Physical ch...
2            Objectives (4 of 7)• Describe radiation (non-ionizing and  ionizing) as well as the differences among  alpha ...
2            Objectives (5 of 7)• Describe the differences between the  following pairs of terms:  – Contamination and sec...
2            Objectives (6 of 7)• Describe the following types of weapons  of mass destruction:  – Nerve agents  – Blister...
2            Objectives (7 of 7)• Describe the routes of exposure to  hazardous materials for humans
2 Chemical and Physical Properties                  (1 of 2)• Characteristics of a substance• Important to understand for ...
2 Chemical and Physical Properties                       (2 of 2)• Are measurable• They include:  – Vapor density  – Flamm...
2                 State of Matter (1 of 2)The state of matter identifies the hazard as a solid, liquid, or gas.
2          State of Matter (2 of 2)• Helps predict what substance will do  – How will it escape its container?  – Why did ...
2           Physical Change• Can occur when chemicals are subjected  to  – Heat  – Cold  – Pressure
2                   BLEVE• Boiling Liquid/Expanding Vapor Explosion  – Pressurized liquefied materials inside closed    ve...
2            Chemical Reactivity•   Also known as chemical change•   Ability to transform at molecular level•   Usually re...
2      “You Are the Responder”            Case Study• What physical/chemical changes caused:  – The rags to spontaneously ...
2        Critical Characteristics of           Flammable Liquids•   Flash point•   Ignition temperature•   Flammable range...
2           Flash Point (1 of 3)• Minimum temperature at which ignition  results in flash fire• Fire will go out once vapo...
2               Flash Point (2 of 3)Responders should always be mindful of ignition sources at        flammable/combustibl...
2            Flash Point (3 of 3)• Low flash point = higher ignition  temperatures and vapor pressures  – Examples: Gasoli...
2                 Fire Point• Temperature at which sustained  combustion of vapor occurs• Usually slightly higher than fla...
2         Ignition Temperature• Also known as autoignition temperature• Temperature at which heated fuel ignites  and cont...
2           Flammable Range• Concentrations (%) of flammable vapor  and air needed for fuel/air mixture to burn• Defined b...
2         Vapor Pressure (1 of 3)• Pertains to liquids inside closed container• May be expressed in:  – Pounds per square ...
2         Vapor Pressure (2 of 3)The vapors released from the surface of any liquid must      be contained if they are to ...
2         Vapor Pressure (3 of 3)• Influenced by ambient temperature  – High temp. → increased vapor pressure  – Low temp....
2            Boiling Point (1 of 2)• Liquid continually gives off vapors• Molecules must overcome downward  force of atmos...
2              Boiling Point (2 of 2)The concept of boiling point versus atmospheric pressure.
2           Vapor Density (1 of 2)• Weight of vapor compared to weight of air  – Expressed numerically (e.g., in the MSDS)...
2               Vapor Density (2 of 2)                         A.     B. A. Vapor density < 1.0 over the cylinder with the...
2          Specific Gravity (1 of 2)• Compares weight of liquid chemical to  weight of water• Water has specific gravity o...
2              Specific Gravity (2 of 2)Gasoline will float on water, whereas carbon disulfide will not.
2             Water Solubility• Ability of substance to dissolve in water• Water most often used to extinguish fires  – Re...
2             Corrosivity (1 of 3)• Ability of a material to cause damage to  – Skin, eyes, other body parts  – Clothing, ...
2             Corrosivity (2 of 3)• Two types: Acids and bases• Defined by pH  – Acids have pH greater than 7  – Bases hav...
2Corrosivity (3 of 3)    The pH scale.
2   Toxic Products of Combustion• Materials decompose under heat,  resulting in hazardous chemical  compounds• Smoke may n...
2              Radiation (1 of 2)• Energy transmitted by electromagnetic  waves or energetic particles  – Sources: Sun, so...
2     Radiation (2 of 2)Alpha, beta, and gamma radiation.
2             Alpha Particles• Have weight and mass• Travel less than a few centimeters• Protect yourself by:  – Staying s...
2             Beta Particles• More energetic than alpha particles• Pose a greater health hazard  – May redden (erythema) a...
2          Ionizing Radiation• Can cause changes in human cells• Can lead to cancer• Examples: X-rays, gamma rays
2       Non-ionizing Radiation• Comes from electromagnetic waves• Does not have sufficient energy to change  human cells• ...
2           Gamma Radiation• Pure electromagnetic energy• Most energetic radiation responders may  encounter• Passes easil...
2        Hazard and Exposure• Hazard: Material capable of causing harm• Exposure: Process by which people,  animals, the e...
2             Contamination• Residue from released chemical  – Decontamination: Process of residue removal• Secondary cont...
2   Weapons of Mass Destruction          (WMD) (1 of 2)• Mnemonic for types of damage:  TRACEMP  – Thermal  – Radiological...
2 Weapons of Mass Destruction        (WMD) (2 of 2)– Etiological (anthrax, plague, smallpox)– Mechanical– Psychogenic
2          Nerve Agents (1 of 3)• Enter body through lungs or skin• Disrupt central nervous system• May cause death or ser...
2           Nerve Agents (2 of 3)• Signs/symptoms: “SLUDGEM”  – Salivation  – Lacrimation (tearing)  – Urination  – Defeca...
2           Nerve Agents (3 of 3)• “SLUDGEM” – Emesis (vomiting) – Miosis (constriction of the pupil)
2            Blister Agents (1 of 2)•   Also known as vesicants•   Cause blistering of the skin•   Interact in harmful way...
2Blister Agents (2 of 2)  Blister agent exposure.
2                Blood Agents•   Disrupt oxygen transfer from blood to cells•   Can be inhaled•   Can be ingested or absor...
2             Choking Agents• Inhibit breathing and are skin irritants• Extremely irritating odor• Intended to incapacitat...
2   Irritants (Riot Control Agents)• Cause pain and burning sensation  – Exposed to skin, eyes, mucous membranes  – Used t...
2              Convulsants• Cause convulsions or seizures• Even small exposure can be fatal• Examples: Sarin, soman, tabun...
2 Harmful Substances’ Routes of     Entry Into Body (1 of 2)The four ways a harmful substance can enter the body.
2     Harmful Substances’ Routes of         Entry Into Body (2 of 2)•   Inhalation: Through lungs•   Absorption: Through s...
2            Inhalation (1 of 2)• Hazardous materials/WMD, corrosive  materials, particles• SCBA offers excellent protecti...
2             Inhalation (2 of 2)• Air-purifying respirators protect against  certain airborne chemical hazards  – More co...
2                Absorption• Through skin, eyes, nose, mouth• Asphyxiants may form, causing  suffocation• Some agents are ...
2                Ingestion• Chemicals enter body through GI tract• May occur when rotating out from  emergency• After haza...
2                 Injection• Via cuts, abrasions, open wounds• Address these before reporting for duty
2       Chronic Health Hazards• Appear after long-term exposure to hazard• Also after multiple short-term exposures• Targe...
2          Acute Health Effects• Occur after short, acute exposure• Examples: Acid burns (sulfuric acid),  breathing diffi...
2                 Toxicity• Degree to which something is toxic or  poisonous• Or, one such substance’s adverse effects• Le...
2            Summary (1 of 3)• Know chemical and physical properties of  substances• Important to making informed response...
2            Summary (2 of 3)• Understand hazards before responding, to  minimize potential for exposure• Avoid contaminat...
2             Summary (3 of 3)• May be used as WMD: Nerve agent,  blister agent, blood agent, choking agent,  irritant, co...
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HazMat Ch02 ppt

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  • Image: Courtesy of Dr. Saeed Keshavarz/RCCI (Research Center of Chemical Injuries)
  • Image: Courtesy Sperian Respiratory Protection
  • HazMat Ch02 ppt

    1. 1. 2Hazardous Materials: Propertiesand Effects
    2. 2. 2 Objectives (1 of 7)• Describe the following properties: – Boiling point – Chemical reactivity – Corrosivity (pH) – Flammable (explosive) range [lower explosive limit (LEL) and upper explosive limit (UEL)] – Flash point
    3. 3. 2 Objectives (2 of 7)– Ignition (autoignition) temperature– Particle size– Persistence– Physical state (solid, liquid, gas)– Radiation (ionizing and non-ionizing)– Specific gravity
    4. 4. 2 Objectives (3 of 7)– Toxic products of combustion– Vapor density– Vapor pressure– Water solubility– Physical change and chemical change
    5. 5. 2 Objectives (4 of 7)• Describe radiation (non-ionizing and ionizing) as well as the differences among alpha and beta particles, gamma rays, and neutrons.
    6. 6. 2 Objectives (5 of 7)• Describe the differences between the following pairs of terms: – Contamination and secondary contamination – Exposure and contamination – Exposure and hazard – Infectious and contagious – Acute and chronic effects – Acute and chronic exposures
    7. 7. 2 Objectives (6 of 7)• Describe the following types of weapons of mass destruction: – Nerve agents – Blister agents – Choking agents – Irritants
    8. 8. 2 Objectives (7 of 7)• Describe the routes of exposure to hazardous materials for humans
    9. 9. 2 Chemical and Physical Properties (1 of 2)• Characteristics of a substance• Important to understand for hazardous substances/WMD• Basis of good decisions on response
    10. 10. 2 Chemical and Physical Properties (2 of 2)• Are measurable• They include: – Vapor density – Flammability – Corrosivity – Water reactivity
    11. 11. 2 State of Matter (1 of 2)The state of matter identifies the hazard as a solid, liquid, or gas.
    12. 12. 2 State of Matter (2 of 2)• Helps predict what substance will do – How will it escape its container? – Why did the container fail?• Influences the incident’s duration – In turn, informs emergency response plan
    13. 13. 2 Physical Change• Can occur when chemicals are subjected to – Heat – Cold – Pressure
    14. 14. 2 BLEVE• Boiling Liquid/Expanding Vapor Explosion – Pressurized liquefied materials inside closed vessel are exposed to high heat – Results in physical change from liquid to gas• Examples: propane, butane• Expansion ratio: Describes the volume increase that occurs
    15. 15. 2 Chemical Reactivity• Also known as chemical change• Ability to transform at molecular level• Usually releases some form of energy• Examples – Steel when it rusts – Wood when it burns
    16. 16. 2 “You Are the Responder” Case Study• What physical/chemical changes caused: – The rags to spontaneously ignite? – Failure of the small, propane cylinder? – Fire fighters and residents to experience skin irritation?
    17. 17. 2 Critical Characteristics of Flammable Liquids• Flash point• Ignition temperature• Flammable range• Only substances in gaseous or vapor state will combust – Solids and liquids produce vapor, then ignite
    18. 18. 2 Flash Point (1 of 3)• Minimum temperature at which ignition results in flash fire• Fire will go out once vapor fuel is consumed
    19. 19. 2 Flash Point (2 of 3)Responders should always be mindful of ignition sources at flammable/combustible liquid incidents.
    20. 20. 2 Flash Point (3 of 3)• Low flash point = higher ignition temperatures and vapor pressures – Examples: Gasoline, ethyl alcohol, acetone• High flash point = lower ignition temperatures and vapor pressures – Example: #2 grade diesel fuel
    21. 21. 2 Fire Point• Temperature at which sustained combustion of vapor occurs• Usually slightly higher than flash point
    22. 22. 2 Ignition Temperature• Also known as autoignition temperature• Temperature at which heated fuel ignites and continues to burn• No external ignition source necessary
    23. 23. 2 Flammable Range• Concentrations (%) of flammable vapor and air needed for fuel/air mixture to burn• Defined by lower and upper limits: – Lower explosive limit (LEL) – Upper explosive limit (UEL)• More dangerous material has wider range
    24. 24. 2 Vapor Pressure (1 of 3)• Pertains to liquids inside closed container• May be expressed in: – Pounds per square inch (PSI) – Atmospheres (atm) – Torr – Millimeters of mercury (mm Hg)
    25. 25. 2 Vapor Pressure (2 of 3)The vapors released from the surface of any liquid must be contained if they are to exert pressure.
    26. 26. 2 Vapor Pressure (3 of 3)• Influenced by ambient temperature – High temp. → increased vapor pressure – Low temp. → decreased vapor pressure• Causes liquid to evaporate when released – High vapor pressure → evaporates quickly – Low vapor pressure → evaporates slowly
    27. 27. 2 Boiling Point (1 of 2)• Liquid continually gives off vapors• Molecules must overcome downward force of atmospheric pressure• If maintained, all liquid will turn into gas
    28. 28. 2 Boiling Point (2 of 2)The concept of boiling point versus atmospheric pressure.
    29. 29. 2 Vapor Density (1 of 2)• Weight of vapor compared to weight of air – Expressed numerically (e.g., in the MSDS) – Air has set vapor density of 1.0 – Vapor density > 1.0 = heavier; < 1.0 = lighter• Affects gas’ behavior during release• Lighter-than-air gases: “4H MEDIC ANNA”
    30. 30. 2 Vapor Density (2 of 2) A. B. A. Vapor density < 1.0 over the cylinder with the gas leak risingupward. B. Vapor density > 1.0 over the cylinder with the heavier- than-air leak.
    31. 31. 2 Specific Gravity (1 of 2)• Compares weight of liquid chemical to weight of water• Water has specific gravity of 1.0• Materials with specific gravity < 1.0 float• Materials with specific gravity > 1.0 sink• Most flammable liquids float on water
    32. 32. 2 Specific Gravity (2 of 2)Gasoline will float on water, whereas carbon disulfide will not.
    33. 33. 2 Water Solubility• Ability of substance to dissolve in water• Water most often used to extinguish fires – Reacts violently with some chemicals (e.g., sulfuric acid, metallic sodium, magnesium)
    34. 34. 2 Corrosivity (1 of 3)• Ability of a material to cause damage to – Skin, eyes, other body parts – Clothing, rescue equipment• Corrosive chemicals should be taken seriously – Materials require unique response tactics
    35. 35. 2 Corrosivity (2 of 3)• Two types: Acids and bases• Defined by pH – Acids have pH greater than 7 – Bases have pH less than 7 – pH 7 is neutral• pH < 2.5 or > 12.5 considered strong
    36. 36. 2Corrosivity (3 of 3) The pH scale.
    37. 37. 2 Toxic Products of Combustion• Materials decompose under heat, resulting in hazardous chemical compounds• Smoke may not be just smoke! – Soot, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water vapor, formaldehyde, cyanide compounds, nitrogen oxides
    38. 38. 2 Radiation (1 of 2)• Energy transmitted by electromagnetic waves or energetic particles – Sources: Sun, soil, X-rays, occupational exposures encountered in the field• Amount absorbed and exposure time affect degree of damage
    39. 39. 2 Radiation (2 of 2)Alpha, beta, and gamma radiation.
    40. 40. 2 Alpha Particles• Have weight and mass• Travel less than a few centimeters• Protect yourself by: – Staying several feet from source – Using HEPA filter on simple respirator – Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)
    41. 41. 2 Beta Particles• More energetic than alpha particles• Pose a greater health hazard – May redden (erythema) and burn skin – May be inhaled; use SCBA• Can travel 10 to 15 feet in open air• Are considered ionizing radiation• Cannot pass through most solid objects
    42. 42. 2 Ionizing Radiation• Can cause changes in human cells• Can lead to cancer• Examples: X-rays, gamma rays
    43. 43. 2 Non-ionizing Radiation• Comes from electromagnetic waves• Does not have sufficient energy to change human cells• Examples: Sound waves, radio waves, microwaves
    44. 44. 2 Gamma Radiation• Pure electromagnetic energy• Most energetic radiation responders may encounter• Passes easily through thick, solid objects• Form of ionizing radiation; can be deadly• SCBA will not provide protection• Neutrons can create gamma radiation
    45. 45. 2 Hazard and Exposure• Hazard: Material capable of causing harm• Exposure: Process by which people, animals, the environment, and equipment come into contact with hazardous material
    46. 46. 2 Contamination• Residue from released chemical – Decontamination: Process of residue removal• Secondary contamination is transferred from source by direct contact• PPE protects if contact cannot be avoided – Does not enable unlimited contact
    47. 47. 2 Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) (1 of 2)• Mnemonic for types of damage: TRACEMP – Thermal – Radiological – Asphyxiation – Chemical
    48. 48. 2 Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) (2 of 2)– Etiological (anthrax, plague, smallpox)– Mechanical– Psychogenic
    49. 49. 2 Nerve Agents (1 of 3)• Enter body through lungs or skin• Disrupt central nervous system• May cause death or serious impairment – Dose absorbed dictates extent of damage• Examples: Sarin, VX
    50. 50. 2 Nerve Agents (2 of 3)• Signs/symptoms: “SLUDGEM” – Salivation – Lacrimation (tearing) – Urination – Defecation – Gastric disturbance
    51. 51. 2 Nerve Agents (3 of 3)• “SLUDGEM” – Emesis (vomiting) – Miosis (constriction of the pupil)
    52. 52. 2 Blister Agents (1 of 2)• Also known as vesicants• Cause blistering of the skin• Interact in harmful ways with body• Examples: Sulfur mustard, Lewisite
    53. 53. 2Blister Agents (2 of 2) Blister agent exposure.
    54. 54. 2 Blood Agents• Disrupt oxygen transfer from blood to cells• Can be inhaled• Can be ingested or absorbed through skin• Example: Cyanide compounds – Typical signs/symptoms: Vomiting, dizziness, watery eyes, deep and rapid breathing
    55. 55. 2 Choking Agents• Inhibit breathing and are skin irritants• Extremely irritating odor• Intended to incapacitate, but may kill – May cause pulmonary edema (“dry drowning”)• Examples: Chlorine, phosgene, chloropicrin
    56. 56. 2 Irritants (Riot Control Agents)• Cause pain and burning sensation – Exposed to skin, eyes, mucous membranes – Used to briefly incapacitate a person or group• Least toxic of the WMD groups – Decontaminate with water; effects are meant to wear off• Example: Mace
    57. 57. 2 Convulsants• Cause convulsions or seizures• Even small exposure can be fatal• Examples: Sarin, soman, tabun, VX – Also organophosphate and carbamate pesticides
    58. 58. 2 Harmful Substances’ Routes of Entry Into Body (1 of 2)The four ways a harmful substance can enter the body.
    59. 59. 2 Harmful Substances’ Routes of Entry Into Body (2 of 2)• Inhalation: Through lungs• Absorption: Through skin• Ingestion: Through gastrointestinal tract• Injection: Through cuts or breaches in skin
    60. 60. 2 Inhalation (1 of 2)• Hazardous materials/WMD, corrosive materials, particles• SCBA offers excellent protection• Infectious and contagious organisms also hazard• Example: Anthrax
    61. 61. 2 Inhalation (2 of 2)• Air-purifying respirators protect against certain airborne chemical hazards – More comfortable – Allow longer work periods
    62. 62. 2 Absorption• Through skin, eyes, nose, mouth• Asphyxiants may form, causing suffocation• Some agents are carcinogens• Aggressive solvents (e.g., paint stripper and hydrofluoric acid)
    63. 63. 2 Ingestion• Chemicals enter body through GI tract• May occur when rotating out from emergency• After hazardous work, wash before drinking/eating
    64. 64. 2 Injection• Via cuts, abrasions, open wounds• Address these before reporting for duty
    65. 65. 2 Chronic Health Hazards• Appear after long-term exposure to hazard• Also after multiple short-term exposures• Target organ effect – Example: Asbestosis
    66. 66. 2 Acute Health Effects• Occur after short, acute exposure• Examples: Acid burns (sulfuric acid), breathing difficulties, and skin irritation (formaldehyde, a “sensitizer")
    67. 67. 2 Toxicity• Degree to which something is toxic or poisonous• Or, one such substance’s adverse effects• Lethal dose (LD)• Lethal concentration (LC)• OSHA descriptions based on LD and LC
    68. 68. 2 Summary (1 of 3)• Know chemical and physical properties of substances• Important to making informed response• Understand physical and chemical changes• Be familiar with characteristics of flammable liquids
    69. 69. 2 Summary (2 of 3)• Understand hazards before responding, to minimize potential for exposure• Avoid contamination whenever possible• Hazardous substances/WMD enter the body through inhalation, ingestion, injection, and absorption
    70. 70. 2 Summary (3 of 3)• May be used as WMD: Nerve agent, blister agent, blood agent, choking agent, irritant, convulsant• HEPA filters and SCBA protect lungs• Chronic health effects occur after years of exposure—wear protective gear!
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