Depth of Field 2012

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Examples of Depth of Field

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  • Thall, Bob\n\nAmerican, b. 1948 Evanston, IL\n\n\nBob Thall is known for formally rigorous and deadpan portrayals of the urban and suburban landscape in Chicago. The photograph Chicago (Near O'Hare) is part of a series he produced in the 1990s that focused on the "edge cities" of Chicago — the too-quickly constructed suburban communities surrounding the urban center and older suburban ring. Capturing the sleek artificiality of these recent rootless developments, the image conveys the power, pervasiveness and emptiness of suburban corporate architecture. This work was published in 1999 as the book The New American Village.Thall was born in 1948 in Chicago and received a BA and MFA in photography from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has been a professor of photography since 1976 at Columbia College Chicago and is currently chair of the photography department. Thall is a recipient of a 1998 John F. Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. The New American Village pictures were shown in a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College Chicago, in 1999. His photographs are included in many collections, including the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris; Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal; J. Paul Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities, Los Angeles; Library of Congress, Washington, DC; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and The Victoria and Albert Museum, London.\n
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  • Plumb, Colleen\n\nAmerican, b. 1970\n\n\nColleen Plumb is driven as a photographer by an interest in how people relate to and interact with the natural world. She began this photographic project in 1997, when she started looking for examples of "fake nature," as she describes it—simulations of natural environments or their substitutes in urban contexts. This investigation turned into the ongoing series, Animals Are Outside Today, in which she looks to the relationships between humans and animals, giving close consideration to the slight and significant ways in which they become part of our individual and collective experience. Some of the photographs illustrate how people coexist with or exert control over animals, whether by keeping them as domesticated pets, raising them as livestock, or presenting them to spectators in zoos or circuses. In many of Plumb's images, harsher realities emerge and death becomes an underlying theme. Photographs of pig carcasses in a butcher shop, for instance, underline the unthinking urges of human consumption. Meanwhile, other images picture the bodies of dead animals left to decay in public places, as in one of a gray mouse on a sidewalk, overlooked in a manner that would be inconceivable with human remains. Typically capturing these moments with a narrow depth of field and from a low angle, Plumb brings the viewer in close to the animals, entering their immediate domain, while the wider surroundings become a blur.Plumb's imagery diverges dramatically from more standard depictions of the animal kingdom, with either romantic or scientific inflections, yet her work doesn't amount to an explicit appeal for animal rights or a criticism of human habits. Rather, her photographs allude to a wide range of attitudes towards the creatures around us, both positive and negative. Some pictures reflect unnerving or unflattering realities, certainly, but others allude to how animals capture our imaginations and become sources of inspiration or comfort. Familiar fauna are encountered as the subjects of paintings in museums and of murals emblazened across the sides of buildings, and even taxidermied animals, whether thought of as trophies or specimens, speak to the habit of keeping animals around to be looked at or admired. Plumb received a BFA in visual communication from Northern Illinois University, DeKalb (1992) and an MFA in photography from Columbia College Chicago (1999), where she has taught since 2000.\n\n
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  • Depth of Field 2012

    1. 1. DEPTH OF FIELDThe range of focus in a picture.
    2. 2. • DEPTH OF FIELD: “The area between the nearest and farthest points from the camera that are acceptably sharp.” (London/Upton, Photography, pg. 407) Your definition:How much of the image is in focus. 2
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    4. 4. Distance and D-of-Field
    5. 5. Aperture and D-of-Field
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    7. 7. Shallow Depth of FieldClose to your subject.OPEN aperture.f1.7,f2,f2.8
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    9. 9. Extensive Depth of FieldSet the camera atf16 or f22.The smaller the aperture,the more of the picturethat will be in sharp focus.
    10. 10. Extensive D-of-FieldDON’T use your viewfinder to focus!Set aperture and use D-of-F Ring.Put aperture on 22 and focus ring on6 feet and infinity. Try it!
    11. 11. Robert Adams
    12. 12. Ansel Adams 12
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    14. 14. Bob Thall 14
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    18. 18. Shallow Depth-of-Field 18
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    20. 20. ColleenPlumb 20
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    23. 23. Student WorksWhat and how? 23
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    26. 26. Create a still-life composition of 3 objects placed on the pages of an open book.Choose your objects and book with intention so that the objects somehow relate ORcontrast to the text in the book.• Arrange the objects at varying distances from the camera.• Make sure you can see some of the text in the composition.• Light the still-life using window or artificial light.BRACKET each with SHUTTER speeds...More info on handouts. 26
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