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Social media security november 2012- Rose Miller
Social media security november 2012- Rose Miller
Social media security november 2012- Rose Miller
Social media security november 2012- Rose Miller
Social media security november 2012- Rose Miller
Social media security november 2012- Rose Miller
Social media security november 2012- Rose Miller
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Social media security november 2012- Rose Miller

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  • Background for the Trainer: Be prepared to discuss your organization’s policies and procedures concerning alternative work arrangements. Familiarize yourself with examples of alternative work arrangements currently in effect in the organization. Talk to the managers and supervisors involved and find out what problems they have experienced and what suggestions they have for their colleagues. Also talk to some employees involved in different types of alternative work arrangements and learn how they feel about their situation. Speaker’s Notes: This training session will focus on supervising alternative work arrangements. As the workforce becomes more diversified and employers struggle to cope with the demands of a rapidly changing marketplace, alternative work arrangements are becoming more popular and more common. During this training session, you will be provided with the information you need to successfully supervise alternative work arrangements and make the most of what they have to offer you, your employees, and the organization.
  • Speaker’s Notes: You should handle requests and proposed assignments for flexible scheduling the way you would any other employment or placement decision. In addition to the qualities we’ve already discussed, legitimate eligibility requirements for selecting employees for alternative work arrangements include length of time with the organization, length of time in the current job, and satisfactory performance evaluations. Remember, however, that using consistent selection criteria doesn’t necessarily mean making the same arrangements for each individual. Even though you need to use the same selection criteria, each arrangement must be worked out to the mutual satisfaction of the supervisor and the employee. Finally, alternative work arrangements work best when employees choose them. If they are forced or mandated, they are no longer “flexible” or “alternative.”
  • Speaker’s Notes: Here are some other important points to remember about alternative work arrangements. First of all, not everyone wants a nontraditional work schedule. Many—maybe even most—of your employees are perfectly happy with the standard work arrangement. Not all jobs are well suited to alternative work arrangements, just as not all employees are suited to them. Jobs that require employees to be on-site and full-time during regular working hours, for example, are usually not suitable. In addition, different jobs lend themselves to different work arrangements. For example, an office worker may be able to do some work at home, while compressed workweeks would be a better option for a production worker.
  • Speaker’s Notes: A number of factors contribute to the success of alternative work arrangements. Several of them concern the employees involved. Not all employees are suited to these arrangements. For alternative work arrangements to succeed, employees need to be self-motivated and self-disciplined. They must also be independent individuals who can work well without a lot of supervision and who know how and when to take initiative. They must be mature people with self-confidence in their ability to handle the work and related problems. They need to be reliable as well. You have to be able to count on them even though you may not have as much direct contact with them as with other employees. It’s best if they are well-organized, task-oriented individuals. Finally, it’s essential that they be familiar with the job and the company, and experienced in their field of work so that they can handle the particular responsibilities that come with their nontraditional work arrangement.
  • Speaker’s Notes: Supervising alternative work arrangements successfully involves a number of key factors in addition to those we’ve already talked about. Objectives, expectations, and timetables must all be spelled out. Misunderstandings on any of these issues are likely to lead to serious problems with the arrangement. Communication is critical not only when you set up an alternative work arrangement but also once it is in operation. You must ensure that all employees receive necessary information regardless of the hours they work or whether they work on-site or off. This means using e-mail and other technological links as well as standard communication methods, such as memos, meetings, bulletin boards, and employee handbooks. It is also vital to enforce the same standards for employees with alternative work arrangements as for all employees. You must make it clear that you are doing so. A flexible work schedule is not an acceptable excuse for late or poor-quality work. In addition, you have to carefully monitor the performance of employees who are working flexible schedules. Just because they may be out of sight some or all of the time doesn’t mean they should ever be out of mind. Of course, you need to be sure that all employees get required job training and have access to other training opportunities that will help them grow and develop as well. With employees working flexible schedules, this may take more than the usual planning and coordination.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Pinnacle Human Resources, LLC Social Media Security Social Media Security November, 2012
    • 2. Emerging Issues Involving Social Media  Workproduct Ownership  Ownership of Social Media Connections  Privacy Issues  Discrimination & Retaliation  Unions Social Media Security November, 2012
    • 3. Company Concerns Technology & Social Media has Changed the Way We Work Employers Need to Protect Themselves from the Misuse of Technology New Policies Need to be Developed and Managers Need to Help Enforce Them Two Examples- Architect and Car Dealership Social Media Security November, 2012
    • 4. Managers Need to SupportTechnology & Social Media Policies Developing Performance Measures Background Checks and Monitoring Social Sites Reporting Claims and Supporting Claims Looking for Retaliatory Behavior Recording Hours Worked Checking for Abuse of Technology Collection of Signed Acknowledgements Social Media Security November, 2012
    • 5. Effective Supervision Being a Good Example Communicating Policies and Following Procedures Communicating Standards Monitoring Performance Training Social Media Security November, 2012
    • 6. About Pinnacle Human Resources, LLC Pinnacle’s staff is comprised of certified Senior Professionals in HR (SPHR) from the Certification Institute in Princeton, NJ and Masters in Education. Pinnacle employes over a dozen HR Professionals plus partners within a network of independent consultants to increase bandwidth. When appropriate, we tap into the knowledge and experience of a variety of professionals and subject matter experts that comprise our team of strategic partners. We feel clients derive substantial benefit from this approach. Rose Miller, SPHR/Owner rmiller@pinnaclehrllc.com 7 Century Hill Drive, Latham, NY 518-486-8151 www.pinnaclehrllc.com Social Media Security November, 2012
    • 7. About Pinnacle Human Resources, LLC Pinnacle’s staff is comprised of certified Senior Professionals in HR (SPHR) from the Certification Institute in Princeton, NJ and Masters in Education. Pinnacle employes over a dozen HR Professionals plus partners within a network of independent consultants to increase bandwidth. When appropriate, we tap into the knowledge and experience of a variety of professionals and subject matter experts that comprise our team of strategic partners. We feel clients derive substantial benefit from this approach. Rose Miller, SPHR/Owner rmiller@pinnaclehrllc.com 7 Century Hill Drive, Latham, NY 518-486-8151 www.pinnaclehrllc.com Social Media Security November, 2012

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