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SIXSeoul13 Day 3: The Popular and Alternative in Dialogue - Naresh V Narasimhan
 

SIXSeoul13 Day 3: The Popular and Alternative in Dialogue - Naresh V Narasimhan

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    SIXSeoul13 Day 3: The Popular and Alternative in Dialogue - Naresh V Narasimhan SIXSeoul13 Day 3: The Popular and Alternative in Dialogue - Naresh V Narasimhan Presentation Transcript

    • Social Innovation Exchange_ Seoul The‘ Popular’and‘Alternative’in dialogue NARESH V NARASIMHAN (SEPT-2013)
    • BANGALORE c.1990 2
    • GARDEN CITYTO SILICONVALLEY 3
    • 1990’sBANGALORE CITY LIMITS 4.0 Million 0.5 Million 280 km2 6.2 Million 1.4 Million 532 km2 9.6 Million 4.0 Million 851 km2 2000’s 2012 Source : Bangalore Traffic Police Source : Census data, Karnataka Source : Soft Mobility, Possibilities for the Indian Context, Seven High Street 4
    • Source : Bangalore Traffic Police 1200 vehicles registered in the city daily YEAR 1980 1985 1990 1995 19991997 2001 20072004 20101996 2000 20062003 20091998 2002 20082005 2011 TRAFFIC(MILLIONS) 1.5L 40L EXPONENTIAL INCREASE Growth rate over years 4.2Mil 0.15Mil 1200 vehicles registered in the city daily 5
    • 4.2 Million vehicles in the city 3.7 Million vehicles are privately owned People :Vehicle : : 3 :1 (for Bangalore City) Source : Bangalore Traffic Police 6
    • EXCESS MOTORISATION AND ITS IMPACT ON URBAN QUALITY OF LIFE LOSS OF URBAN‘LIVING SPACE’ AIR POLLUTION ACCIDENTS Motorisation with poor pedestrian facilities leads to accidents. NOISE Transport is one of the main sources of urban noise pollution. VISUAL INTRUSION Short sighted projects to‘improve’ infrastructure cause more harm than good. ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY Traffic congestion, pollution, accidents and delays result in significant direct and indirect costs. THE BIG PICTURE Urban realm and motorisation impacts MoreVehicles occupies more space Increased vehicular traffic causes environmental degradation and increased health problems. 7
    • Source : Bangalore Mirror, Un-Jam Bangalore Average peak hour speeds reduced to 10-12km/hr Congestion delay losses amounting USD 32 Million in the city/ year 240 man hours wasted in traffic/ year/ person 8
    • Asthma rates increased by 10 times in the last 16 years At 75km/hr, an automobile emits 6.4g of Carbon Monoxide/km; at 10km/hr, an automobile emits 33g of Carbon Monoxide/km Source : Deccan Herald, April 2013 9
    • MODAL SPLIT ONTHE INDIAN STREETS 10
    • PrivateVehicles make up nearly 88% of motor vehicles on Bangalore’s Streets Yet account for only 37% of the total trips in the city Source : A study of the autorickshaw sector in Bangalore City, CiSTUP, Dec 2012 Source : Bangalore Traffic Police 11
    • To counter growing numbers, nearly 400km of new roads planned at a cost of USD 600 Mil 4500 km of existing road length = 8.4% of city built up area THIS FLYOVER WAS BUILT TO CLEAN THE MESS MADE BY THE LAST FLYOVER...THAT CLEANED THE MESS OF THE LAST FLYOVER...THAT CLEANED THE MESS OF THE LAST FLYOVER....THAT CLEANED.. Source: Bangalore Mobility Indicators, DULT 2008 12
    • Large scale infrastructural costs associated with MassTransit Solutions Source : Namma Bengaluru website 13
    • • Unresolved measures to address last mile connectivity • Insufficient frequency of services • Lack of reliability • Fixed origins, destinations, routes and stops • Not integrated with other modes of transport • Large infrastructural costs • Existing PublicTransport inconvenient and crowded carrying 50% of the commuting public Popular‘ PUBLIC MODE‘of transportation_ is not the best alternative 14
    • need for an IDEAL _ ALTERNATIVE to demotorise 15
    • HAILTAXIS TAXI INTEGRATEDWITH OTHER MODES OFTRANSPORT LAST MILE CONNECTIVITY EASY MODE OF PAYMENT SAFE, PROFESSIONAL, COMFORTABLE SMART / INTEGRATED METHODS USEDTO LOCATE TAXI STANDS AT 500 M 24 X 7 CONNECTIVITY SHARED SYSTEM : PRIVATE MODE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION New mode of public - private transportation 16
    • THE CURRENT INDIAN POLITICAL SCENARIO A culture of‘freebies’and subsidies at the central and state level 17
    • The HailTaxi : A form of ‘Urban Freebies’? SubsidisingTaxi’s as public transport 18
    • TAXI Mode-wise cost/ km/ vehicle in Bangalore (USD)* COMPARING MODES Average Running Distance covered per day (km)** 200 215 120 0.01-0.06 0.27 0.16 Fare/km (USD) 0.02 0.16 0.10 *Source : A Study of the Auto-Rickshaw sector in Bangalore city, CiSTUP, IISc, December 2012 **Source : Bangalore Mobility Indicators 2008, DULT Source : BMTC website Source : ILFS, RITES report India / Managing Traffic Demand in Bangalore 25 26 0.11 0.03 Source : A Study of the Auto-Rickshaw sector in Bangalore city, CiSTUP, IISc, December 2012 Source : A Study of the Auto-Rickshaw sector in Bangalore city, CiSTUP, IISc, December 2012 Source : Bangalore Mobility Indicators 2008, DULT 19
    • Comparing the HailTaxi and the 2 wheeler Cost of using a HailTaxi is 25% cheaper than using a 2 wheeler Monthly cost to operate (Including maintenance) = USD 45 Monthly cost to use = USD 34 Fare/ km = USD 0.07 20
    • Total reduction in the number of private vehicles on the road is 2.9 Mil (total of 4.2 Mil) Replaced by HailTaxis to cater to the existing number of daily trips in the city 2.3 Mil 0.6 Mil CONVERTTO NEW ALTERNATIVE MODE Assuming 80% of 2 wheelers transition to the HailTaxi Assuming 80% of 4 wheelers transition to the HailTaxi TRANSITIONINGVEHICLESTOTHE HAILTAXI 21
    • TAXI TAXI 30TRIPS IN A DAY** 1 60 PASSENGERS SERVED = = Transportation demand management solution, rather than being a supply side solution INTRODUCTION OF ~2,60,000 CABS CAN COVER NEARLY 42% OFTHE DAILYTRIPS IN BANGALORE CITY Number of daily trips in Bangalore = 14.4 million* * Bangalore’s per capital trip rate (PCTR) is 1.5; Population is 9.6 Mil. Daily trips in Bangalore City = 9.6X1.5 = 14.4 Mil ** Assuming a taxi can make 2 trips in an hour and serve 2 passengers per trip 0.13 Mil Assuming all Autos are replaced by HailTaxis 0.13 Mil 22
    • DEMOTORISATION Managing the traffic volume TAXI Vehicle (Mil) 0.5M 1M 1.5M 2.0M 2.5M Source : De-motorising Bangalore Source : PVK Group of Companies, Unlocking Bangalore REDUCINGTRAFFIC NUMBERS USINGTHE HAILTAXI CAN BE ACHIEVED BYTHE INTRODUCTION OF 2,60,000 HAILTAXIS ONTHE STREETS RESULTING IN NEARLY 2.8 MILLIONVEHICLES OFFTHE STREETS Existing Ideal 23
    • YEAR 1980 1985 1990 1995 19991997 2001 20072004 20101996 2000 20062003 20091998 2002 20082005 2011 TRAFFIC(MILLIONS) 1.5L UPON INTRODUCTION OFTHE HAILTAXIS Expected decline in traffic 65% reduction in vehicular numbers on the roads 1.4 Mil 0.15Mil 4.2 Mil Source : De-motorising Bangalore Source : PVK Group of Companies, Unlocking Bangalore 24
    • EXPECTED OUTCOMES DUETO DEMOTORISATION INTHE CITY • Improved Air Quality and Public Health • Road surfaces transformed into active public assets • Road Narrowing scheme 25
    • EXPECTED OUTCOMES DUETO DEMOTORISATION INTHE CITY • Decrease in number of accidents • Further reduction of vehicular traffic by introducing Bus RapidTransit System • Investment in heavy infrastructure curtailed 26
    • Detroit was the fifth largest city in 1950 with population of 1.9 Million people. Source : Woodward Avenue Detroit 1917 27
    • Detroit city in 2000 with population of 0.9 Million people. Detroit Michigan 28
    • RICKSHAW DRIVERS TRAINEDTO BECOME HAILTAXI DRIVERS GUARANTEED SALE OF 0.26MIL* VEHICLES ANNUALLY ENVIRONMENTAL & SOCIAL GAIN COSTS LOSSES FROMTAX REVENUES**= PROTESTS FROM AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY PROTESTS FROM AUTORICKSHAW COMMUNITY * Bangalore registered nearly 0.32 Million vehicles in 2012 ** Projected State-wise total tax on vehicles in 2013-14 for Karnataka State is USD 600 Million expected pitfalls 29
    • “LIFE, SPACE, BUILDING - IN THAT ORDER” Jan Gehl NARESH V NARASIMHAN naresh@metaform.in 30