The Story of California Advancement Academies, Meg Long

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The Story of California Advancement Academies, Meg Long

  1. 1. California Advancement Academies Meg Long, Deputy Director OMG Center June 25, 2013 1
  2. 2. Initiative Overview  2001 Ladders of Opportunity policy statement and the basic skills conundrum  Changing industry needs  High wage industry jobs go to workers with PS degree  Under-served Californians lacking basic skills  Career Ladders from “low-paying work to jobs with a future” 2
  3. 3. Overview cont’d  2004 California Gateway Project  Private dollars  12 colleges  Focus on transitioning foster youth  Bridges to PS training in high- wage, high growth fields  2007 Career Advancement Academies  SB 70 funds plus private dollars  5million in 29 out of 112 colleges 3
  4. 4. CAA structure Phase 2: $2.3 million, 15 colleges  CAA elements  Flexible framework vs. model  Incentives for institutional change  Employer and community partnerships  Learning community  Technical assistance from Career Ladders project 4
  5. 5. The CAA framework  Industry responsive technical training  Contextualized basic skills  Student cohorts  “Transitions” supports  Intensive student support services 5
  6. 6. 15 CAA Pathways  Arts, Media, Entertainm ent  Agric., Natural Resources  Bldg. Trades, Construction  Energy, Utilities  Ed, Child Devpt, Family Srvcs  Engineering  Fashion, Interior Design  Finance, Business  Health Sciences, Medical Tech  Hospitality, Tourism, R ec.  Information Technology  Manufacturing, Product Devpt  Marketing, Sales, Servi ce  Public Services  Transportation 6
  7. 7. Who are CAA students? Student  8,000 students to- date  1888 students in 2011-12  Diverse: 52% Hispanic and 12% AA students (36% and 7% for CA college system)  High financial need: 49% qualify for BOG waivers Progress in one year  76% completed all attempted courses  69% term to term persistence  34% certificate  5% transfer or AA 7
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  9. 9. Partners in CAA  Industry employers  WIBs  Community based organizations  Community colleges  State and county agencies  Recruitment  Curriculum  Advisories  Transition support  Soft skills 9
  10. 10. Select lessons for the field  Contextualization of basic skills  Faculty collaboration  Walls between CTE and academics  Developmental sequences  Institutional buy-in and change  Relevance of certificates (7)  Industry  College  Third Party 10
  11. 11. Discussion  What lessons resonate?  What additional questions arise?  What does the CAA story tell us about creating partnerships in support of job creation in the Philadelphia community? 11
  12. 12. Connect with OMG 12  “Follow” us on Twitter: @OMG_Impact  “Like” us on Facebook  Sign Up for OMG News at www.omgcenter.org

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