Diogo Vasconcelos presentation at SIX Spring School 2011

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  • Alchemy, 1947, Jackshon Pullock. Oil, aluminum paint, and string on canvas. Alchemy is one of Jackshon Pullock fascinating paintings. It was executed in the revolutionary technique that constitute his most significant contribution to 20 th century art. By pouring stream of commercial paint onto canvas from a can with the aid of a stick, Pollock made obsolete the conventions and tools of traditional easel paintting. Alchemy is an ancient tradition, the primary objective of which is the creation of the Philosopher's Stone , capable of turning base metals into gold or silver , and acting as a universal medicine. This philosophy and practice is said to help the alchemist prolong youth, resist death, and attain ultimate wisdom .
  • Public Sector Innovation – growing social needs, together with budgetary constraints, call for radically new public service models “ Reforms are ultimately designed to ensure the continuation of the current model - not prompting a rethink for a 21st century public service” David Eaves, Govt2 Task Force (Canada)
  • By 2030, 25% will be over 60. 80+ will double by 2050. Costs pensions, social security, health and long term care to increase by 4-8% GDP by 2025. Biggest healthcare challenge: delivering care to older people and those with chronic conditions
  • 50% of men and 34% of women will have or have had a cancer diagnosis at sometime during their life. People are living longer with cancer: a number of the 200 or so cancers are now considered to be a ‘chronic disease’. Can we think of cancer as a normal part of ageing? Siddhartha Mukherjee suggests that numbers speak to what is normal. And, often this is true – the mojority, or a large minority suggest a normal state of being, or look or behaviour. Therefore, if around 50% of men and 34% of women will have or have had a cancer diagnosis at sometime during their life time – is it then the ‘norm’ to have cancer? People are living longer with the disease and a number of the 200 or so cancers  that we can describe are now considered to be a ‘chronic disease’. can we think of cancer as a normal part of ageing? we talk of, and invest millions in,  ’finding a cure for cancer’ which is important and commendable – but, should we be investing equal amounts in ‘finding a way to live with cancer’. should we start thinking about investing in ‘aids for living with cancer’ in the same way as we do with other chronic diseases, for example. I am not for one moment comparing the life threatening aspects of some cancers with arthritis for example, but I am suggesting that we may think differently. Multiple myeloma, for example, is not a curable cancer, some people die of, some with it but increasing numbers of people (albeit a rare cancer – incidence approx 1% of all cancers and 15% of haematological cancers) are living for 10-20 years with the adverse effects of treatment. Fatigue, pain and peripheral neuropathy are major components of living with myeloma, and arguably, finding a cure would solve those – but, in the meantime, if we thought differently about the endpoint of cancer management – could we do better? http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/15/cancer-the-new-normal
  • San Sebastian 2008
  • Josephine Green
  • Brenton Caffin – Australian Centre for Social Innovation Sharifah Mohammed – loien Centre for Social Innovation, Singapore Anab Jain – Mumbai – my elastic city
  • Rurbanisation in Sri Lanka
  • Lars Jannick Johansen – denmark – Social Finance Taskforce in Nordic Region Charlie Leadbeater – in appropriate footware Chris – running open space
  • Henriette with a 5 meter rowing blade – this is what social innovation means to DG Enterprise
  • Innovation and creativity are the critical comparative advantages which Amsterdam needs to grow and to succeed.
  • On the the shares of the first emission of shares ever, duly filled out and signed. It is the oldest document as such. The VOC “VOC Vereenigde oost - indische compagnie” (Dutch East India Company was the world’s first public limited company. A loan of 6,5 million Guilders was needed to raise the necessary stating capital. At that time, no bank had that kind of money. The VOC came up with a simple yet highly effective solution: the worlds first share, Eveyone was welcome to buy shares. The certificate that this investors received are regarded as the world’s first shares.
  • The first multinational and the first public limited company. In the 17 th and 18 th century the “VOC Vereenigde oost - indische compagnie” (Dutch East India Company) was the biggest trading and shipping company of the world. During 2 centuries it ha fifteen hundred ships and offered employment to well over a million people.
  • VOC shipyard at Middelburg painted by Jan Arends, ca. 1778
  • The shares were publicity tradable and were at fist traded in the offices of the VOC, as well as on the street.. De Beurs of Amsterdam, painted by Emmanuel de Witte, 1653
  • In 1611, the world’s first stock exchange was built in Amsterdam, by architect Hendrick de Keyser. From them on, company stocks and other securities were tratded in ine physical space
  • God create the world … and Lineaus introduced order was a Swedish botanist , physician , and zoologist , who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of binomial nomenclature . He is known as the father of modern taxonomy , and is also considered one of the fathers of modern ecology . The first edition of Systema Naturae was printed in the Netherlands in 1735. It was a twelve-page work.By the time it reached its 10th edition (1758), it classified 4,400 species of animals and 7,700 species of plants
  • Before Carolus Lineaus introduced his biologic classification scheme in 1753, the field of flora and fauna was rather chaotic. Every scientist used his own system, for naming organisms. As a result, people used different names for the same plant. Lineaus came to the rescue with his binominal nomenclature. And that’s why these days all living organisms have a scientific Latin name, which consists of two terms The Linnaean system classified nature within a nested hierarchy , starting with three kingdoms . Kingdoms were divided into Classes and they, in turn, into Orders, which were divided into Genera (singular: genus), which were divided into Species (singular: species). Below the rank of species he sometimes recognized taxa of a lower (unnamed) rank (for plants these are now called " varieties ").
  • Knowing their March 20, 1969 marriage would be a huge press event, John and Yoko decided to use the publicity to promote world peace . They spent their honeymoon in the presidential suite (Room #902) at the Amsterdam Hilton Hotel for a week between March 25 and 31, inviting the world's press into their hotel room every day between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. After their other stunts, such as the nude cover of the Two Virgins album, the press were expecting them to be having sex , but instead the couple were sitting in bed—in John's words "like angels"—talking about peace with signs over their bed reading "Hair Peace" and "Bed Peace".
  • Knowing their March 20, 1969 marriage would be a huge press event, John and Yoko decided to use the publicity to promote world peace . They spent their honeymoon in the presidential suite (Room #902) at the Amsterdam Hilton Hotel for a week between March 25 and 31, inviting the world's press into their hotel room every day between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. After their other stunts, such as the nude cover of the Two Virgins album, the press were expecting them to be having sex , but instead the couple were sitting in bed—in John's words "like angels"—talking about peace with signs over their bed reading "Hair Peace" and "Bed Peace".
  • Here is how The NY Times covered an early videophone call between the mayors of San Francisco and Palo Alto, Calif., at a public demonstration in 1955: "Spokesmen predicted that the elaborate gadget, combining the telephone in the same panel with a maze of television tubes, would have an important place in American life ’probably in the 1960s. "
  • It was a Facebook revolution but mostly a pepple revolution
  • The quest for democracy has produced a remarkable democratic wave More than 100 nations have been seen democratic uprisings over the past few decades. More than 85 authoritarian regimes have fallen. Somehow 68 countries have became democracies. David Brooks, “The quest for Dignity”, IHT, 2/2/2011
  • Homage to Catalonia is political journalist and novelist George Orwell 's personal account of his experiences and observations in the Spanish Civil War . The first edition was published in 1938
  • Diogo Vasconcelos presentation at SIX Spring School 2011

    1. 1. Co-creating the future Diogo Vasconcelos Cisco, SIX, Dialogue Cafe
    2. 7. Guardian, 15 January 2011
    3. 11.   Recovery Through Innovation
    4. 34. <ul><li>There was much in it that I did not understand, in some ways I did not even like it, but I recognized it immediately as a state of affairs worth fighting for </li></ul><ul><li>George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia (1938) </li></ul>
    5. 35. <ul><li>The important thing for Government is not to do things witch individuals are doing already but to do those things which at present are not done at all </li></ul><ul><li>John M. Keynes </li></ul>
    6. 36. A State that stands over people (war, policing etc)
    7. 37. A State that provides for people (welfare)
    8. 38. A State that creates with people (social innovation) Geoff Mulgan

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