Carla Laughton<br />Reminiscence work in public libraries<br />
Research project: <br /><ul><li>research question
methodology
results</li></ul>Exploration of reminiscence work; recommendations<br />The role of public libraries<br />What I will be t...
The research project: background<br />Research question<br />What is the extent and value of reminiscence work in public l...
The research project: background<br />Methodology:<br />Mixed methods approach<br /><ul><li>Literature review
Questionnaire
Interviews</li></ul>Qualitative content analysis; descriptive statistics<br />
What is reminiscence work?<br />“Reminiscence is a technique used in a variety of ways. With people suffering from dementi...
What is reminiscence work?<br />“...providing the material that’s going to help people remember and talk about things”<br ...
What is reminiscence work?<br />
Extent: results<br />Question: Has your library ever engaged in reminiscence work?<br />
Extent: results<br />Question: What reminiscence services does your library currently provide, or has provided in the past...
Audience <br />Most common: <br />Staff/residents of residential/care/nursing homes (21)<br /> Older adults (9)<br /> Staf...
Possible barriers<br />84% of  questionnaire respondents felt that libraries should undertake reminiscence work, but poten...
Partnership: results<br />Question: Has your library service worked with partners to organise reminiscence services?<br />
Partnerships: results <br />
Partnerships: results<br />Advantages? 41 out of 55 respondents said ‘Yes’...<br />“...using partners ensures reminiscence...
Partnerships: results<br />Disadvantages? 19 out of 55 respondents said ‘Yes’...<br />“Library input may not be recognised...
Value<br />Social<br /><ul><li>can reduce isolation, social exclusion, loneliness
can encourage interaction, increase self-esteem
can promote community cohesion
entertaining and enjoyable!</li></li></ul><li>Value<br />Health and well-being<br /><ul><li>can have a positive impact on ...
reducing isolation, social exclusion, loneliness, </li></ul>    increasing self-esteem, can have a positive impact<br />  ...
Value<br />Historical value<br /><ul><li>Preservation of memories
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Reminiscence work

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Reminiscence work

  1. 1. Carla Laughton<br />Reminiscence work in public libraries<br />
  2. 2. Research project: <br /><ul><li>research question
  3. 3. methodology
  4. 4. results</li></ul>Exploration of reminiscence work; recommendations<br />The role of public libraries<br />What I will be talking about today...<br />
  5. 5. The research project: background<br />Research question<br />What is the extent and value of reminiscence work in public libraries, and what are the possibilities regarding collaboration with archives, museums, and the health and care sectors in this area?<br />
  6. 6. The research project: background<br />Methodology:<br />Mixed methods approach<br /><ul><li>Literature review
  7. 7. Questionnaire
  8. 8. Interviews</li></ul>Qualitative content analysis; descriptive statistics<br />
  9. 9. What is reminiscence work?<br />“Reminiscence is a technique used in a variety of ways. With people suffering from dementia it is used to stimulate enjoyable memories and thoughts. With older people in general it is used as a stimulator for conversation and discussion, which can lead on to life story writing or other forms of creative writing. Or it can be used as an icebreaker for gathering anecdotal history, which can be captured and stored”.<br />[Questionnaire respondent]<br />
  10. 10. What is reminiscence work?<br />“...providing the material that’s going to help people remember and talk about things”<br />“Anything from talking to people over an old newspaper to the active collection of oral history”<br />“Working with people to recall memories - often in therapy mode”<br />“Working with older people to reduce social isolation, and ratify their experiences by holding discussion groups, walks, events etc about local and family history”<br />“...using artefacts/multimedia to trigger memories of topics such as childhood...”<br />
  11. 11. What is reminiscence work?<br />
  12. 12. Extent: results<br />Question: Has your library ever engaged in reminiscence work?<br />
  13. 13. Extent: results<br />Question: What reminiscence services does your library currently provide, or has provided in the past?<br />
  14. 14. Audience <br />Most common: <br />Staff/residents of residential/care/nursing homes (21)<br /> Older adults (9)<br /> Staff/visitors of day centres (9)<br /> Any interested individual (8)<br /> Sheltered accommodation residents (5)<br /> Schools/school children (5)<br /> Any local resident (5)<br /> Community groups (4) <br />Others: “refugees”, “prisoners”, “community groups”; “stroke support” groups; “women’s groups”; “church groups”; “friendship clubs”; “disability groups”;“Mothers’ Union”; “WI” groups, “retired people”...<br />
  15. 15. Possible barriers<br />84% of questionnaire respondents felt that libraries should undertake reminiscence work, but potential difficulties were also highlighted...<br />Resources - financial barriers, lack of material, <br /> time, staff<br />Library staff - lack of willingness/ “staff commitment”,<br /> limited time, lack of expertise, lack of<br /> confidence, limited or no training<br /> Audience – lack of interest, possible negative effects, <br /> lack of promotion<br /> - Core service? Library remit? Staff remit?<br />
  16. 16. Partnership: results<br />Question: Has your library service worked with partners to organise reminiscence services?<br />
  17. 17. Partnerships: results <br />
  18. 18. Partnerships: results<br />Advantages? 41 out of 55 respondents said ‘Yes’...<br />“...using partners ensures reminiscence sessions reach a wider and more diverse audience”<br />“...it enables a fairly wide range of materials to be available for loan that would be a prohibitive expense for one organisation...”<br />“...we both brought a different range of skills and expertise”. <br />
  19. 19. Partnerships: results<br />Disadvantages? 19 out of 55 respondents said ‘Yes’...<br />“Library input may not be recognised or may be marginalised”<br />“...there are issues regarding the different ways in which we work and the different priorities”<br />“....objectives may differ from those of the library/archives service”<br />
  20. 20. Value<br />Social<br /><ul><li>can reduce isolation, social exclusion, loneliness
  21. 21. can encourage interaction, increase self-esteem
  22. 22. can promote community cohesion
  23. 23. entertaining and enjoyable!</li></li></ul><li>Value<br />Health and well-being<br /><ul><li>can have a positive impact on people suffering </li></ul> from conditions causing memory loss<br /><ul><li>can stimulate memories
  24. 24. reducing isolation, social exclusion, loneliness, </li></ul> increasing self-esteem, can have a positive impact<br /> on health and well-being <br />
  25. 25. Value<br />Historical value<br /><ul><li>Preservation of memories
  26. 26. Learning and education
  27. 27. Attributing value to the lives and histories of </li></ul>participants<br />
  28. 28. Value<br />For the library service...<br /><ul><li>Opportunity to engage in outreach work
  29. 29. Reaching a wider audience, engaging more with existing users
  30. 30. Meeting health and well-being agenda
  31. 31. Increasing visibility of library offer</li></li></ul><li>Recommendations<br />Provide a working definition of reminiscence work for library staff<br />Ensure aims and objectives are set out with clarity, and that all library staff are aware of aims and objectives prior to undertaking reminiscence work<br />Provide relevant training for library staff <br />Promote library reminiscence services<br />
  32. 32. Recommendations<br />Ensure all partners agree on aims and objectives, and see the importance/ value of reminiscence work before beginning work together<br />Ensure good communication throughout collaborations<br />Be aware of potential barriers/difficulties<br />Establish good/best practice, create ‘guidelines’, and communicate this knowledge to other organisations<br />
  33. 33. Bibliography<br />Age Exchange. (2010). Age Exchange [Online]. London: Age Exchange. http://www.age-exchange.org.uk/<br />Cappeliez, P. & O’Rourke, N. (2006). “Empirical Validation of a Model of Reminiscence and Health in Later Life.” Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 61B (4), 237-244.<br />Duffy, J. (2007). “Reminiscence work: Breathing Places- Breath in deep.” Public Library Journal, 22 (4), 29.<br /> <br />Gibson, F. (2004). “The Northern Ireland Reminiscence Network: promoting social wellbeing by valuing memories.” Health Information and Libraries Journal, 21 (2), 62-65.<br />Hicks et al. (2010). Public library activity in the areas of health and well-being- Final Report. Birmingham: Museums, Libraries and Archives Council. [Online]. Birmingham: MLA. http://research.mla.gov.uk/evidence/documents/library-health-final-report-20-May-2010.pdf<br />Mortensen, H. A. & Nielsen, G. S. (2007). Guidelines for Library Services to Persons with Dementia. The Hague, IFLA Headquarters: IFLA. (IFLA Professional Reports, No. 104).<br />
  34. 34. The National Archives. (2009). Archives for the 21st Century- England: consultation draft. [Online]. Kew: The National Archives. http://www.mla.gov.uk/what/strategies/~/media/Files/pdf/2009/archives-for-the-21st-century-england [Accessed 28 March 2010].<br /> <br />National Council on Archives. (2001). Taking Part- An audit of social inclusion work in archives. Sheffield: National Council on Archives [Online]. http://www.nca.org.uk/materials/takingpart.pdf [Accessed 28 March 2010].<br />Ryder, J. (2004). “Can’t get to the library? Then we’ll come to you. A survey of library services to people in their own homes in the United Kingdom”. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 21 (2), 5-13.<br />Ulvik, S. (2010). ““Why should the library collect immigrants’ memories?” A study of a multicultural memory group at a public library in Oslo.” New Library World, 111(3/4), 154-160.<br />Wong, P. T. P. & Watt, L. M. (1991). “What Types of Reminiscence Are Associated With Successful Aging?” Psychology and Aging, 6 (2), 272-279.<br />
  35. 35. Based on a MA Librarianship dissertation, supervised by Barbara Sen, Information School, University of Sheffield<br />Public library and local studies staff contributed to this research via interviews and questionnaires. <br />Acknowledgements<br />
  36. 36. Questions?<br />cllaughton@gmail.com<br />

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