Student-centred KM strategies
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Student-centred KM strategies

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  • Everything on slide 20 is 'what could we be doing to make things better'
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  • Current funding restrictions mean HEA cannot fund projects associated with MSc programmes
  • A good individual exercise might be : - describeKM techniques for a large company (HP) – communication, coordination, legal/ audit, archive.
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  • KM Stars, knowledge advisors: this provides extra connectivity and possibly promotes the formation of ‘hubs’. Any kind of reward/ recognition can lead to increased participation.–KM metrics – allows management to see the value of CoPs and put appropriate support structures in place–Web 1.0:tools: Forums, Knowledge Briefs, knowledge network, team spaces, project profile repository – allows CoPs a forum for exchange.–Web 2.0: facebook, blogs, Wikipedia, twitter: can be corporate versions of all these. Allows a forum for exchange as above but with some additional features eg easier to see network activity, 2-way communication, collaborative editing.social network mapping – as per metrics. Processes: regular meetings, discussions, ‘check ins’, coffee talks etc. All of this promotes f2f time which is relevant to the setting up of a CoP.  
  • Process – the KM program in HP had a roadmap for capturing knowledge from every stage of the customer engagement processKM Metrics covered capture, reuse, tool usage, participationHP forums – heavily used. Very clunky user interface but as time went on there was a useful corpus of searchable material there. Not very organised (free text search).The knowledge network was a portal onto lots of knowledge in HP. We used MS share point for team collaboration. KM Stars – people who had (most usually written) useful reports, forum answers etc. You got a certificate, public recognition and occasionally a small financial bonus (eAward). Surprisingly effective.Knowledge advisors were more guides as to how to do KM in HP. Typically this was actually formally part of their job description.Knowledge Briefs were short documents written by consultants about topics of interest – eg secure networking, microsoft exchange servers, Project manager ‘nuggets’ and so on. There was significant pressure to produce these (top level management buy in)me@hp can be thought of as ‘myspace’ or even facebook for HP – written of course before facebook was….Pligg – like digg, you can vote on articles.Hpedia – like wikipedia. Watercooler – aggregated rss feed from all the hp sources Ideavine – vote on the best ideas … Semantic blogging – see my paper about this http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1035134.1035164
  • Process – the KM program in HP had a roadmap for capturing knowledge from every stage of the customer engagement processKM Metrics covered capture, reuse, tool usage, participationHP forums – heavily used. Very clunky user interface but as time went on there was a useful corpus of searchable material there. Not very organised (free text search).The knowledge network was a portal onto lots of knowledge in HP. We used MS share point for team collaboration. KM Stars – people who had (most usually written) useful reports, forum answers etc. You got a certificate, public recognition and occasionally a small financial bonus (eAward). Surprisingly effective.Knowledge advisors were more guides as to how to do KM in HP. Typically this was actually formally part of their job description.Knowledge Briefs were short documents written by consultants about topics of interest – eg secure networking, microsoft exchange servers, Project manager ‘nuggets’ and so on. There was significant pressure to produce these (top level management buy in)me@hp can be thought of as ‘myspace’ or even facebook for HP – written of course before facebook was….Pligg – like digg, you can vote on articles.Hpedia – like wikipedia. Watercooler – aggregated rss feed from all the hp sources Ideavine – vote on the best ideas … Semantic blogging – see my paper about this http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1035134.1035164
  • The picture shows the Hewlett Packard Labs social network based on mining of the email correspondence.the networks analyzed were derived from email messages sent through the Hewlett Packard Labs email server over the period of several months in 2002 and 2003. You can applying various algorithms to identify communities, both formal and informal, within the network. This approach also enables the identification of leadershiproles within the communities. email patterns can be used to model information flow in social groups, taking into account the observation that an item relevant to one person is more likely to be of interest to individuals in the same social circle than those outside of it. This is due to the fact that the similarity of node attributes in social networks decreases as a function of the graph distance. An epidemic model on a scale-free network with this property has a finite threshold, implying that the spread of information is limited.Sincesocial structure affects the flow of information, knowledge of the communities that exist within a network can also be used for navigating the networks when searching for individuals or resources. Adamic and Adar simulated Milgram’s small world experiment on the HP Labs email network. The small world experiment has been carried out a number of times over the past several decades, each time demonstrating that individuals passing messages to their friends and acquaintances can form a short chain between two people separated by geography, profession, and race. While the existence of these chains has been established, how people are able to navigate without knowing the complete social networks has remained an open question. Recently, models have been proposed to explain the phenomenon, and the work of Adamic and Adar is a first study to test the validity of these models on a social network.

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