Kenya Agricultural Carbon Project (KACP) Features and lessons learned
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Kenya Agricultural Carbon Project (KACP) Features and lessons learned

on

  • 394 views

The Kenya Agricultural Carbon Project (KACP), developed by the Vi Agroforestry programme, receives mitigation funding from the World Bank’s BioCarbon Fund for soil carbon sequestration and ...

The Kenya Agricultural Carbon Project (KACP), developed by the Vi Agroforestry programme, receives mitigation funding from the World Bank’s BioCarbon Fund for soil carbon sequestration and above-ground sequestration in trees.

Apart from providing farmers with a small sum of extra cash, the switch to climate-smart agricultural practices has had the additional benefits of increasing crop yields as well as improving farmer’s resilience to climate change. According to a recent World Bank commissioned study, the crop yield increases alone are worth US$ 200-400/ha/year.

In KACP, Vi Agroforestry and the BioCarbon Fund has developed the Sustainable Agricultural Land Management (SALM) methodology. A model approach to measuring soil carbon sequestration is being used, which has been approved by the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) agency. SALM is a public good, free for any organization to use.

However, concerns have been raised, notably by the International Agricultural Trade Policy Institute (IATP), about the adequacy of a carbon market approach to financing a shift to sustainable agriculture. This event will also discuss these concerns.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
394
Views on SlideShare
341
Embed Views
53

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0

1 Embed 53

http://www.siani.se 53

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Kenya Agricultural Carbon Project (KACP) Features and lessons learned Kenya Agricultural Carbon Project (KACP) Features and lessons learned Presentation Transcript

  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanKenya Agricultural CarbonProject (KACP)Features and lessons learnedBy Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanWin-Win-Win scenarioIn KACP it is evidentthat mitigation financeprovide significantincentives to leverageagricultural investmentsthat generate:1) productivityincreases,2) reduction/removalof greenhousegases and3) increased climateresilience.
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanArea characteristicsWestern Kenya (Kitale &Kisumu)3% population growth80% of population are farmers25% of children below 5yrs areunderweightAverage land size owned isaround 1ha90% of populations usefirewood or charcoal forcooking food every dayAround 50% of smallholderslive on less than 1USD/day
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanImplementation status 2011and key features30field officers providingadvisory services20,262 farmers adoptingSALM (target 60,000)9,656 hectare under SALM(target 45,000)1,122 groups recruited (target3,000)598 groups contracted
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanKACP and Climate Smart Agriculture• For mitigation of land degradationand greenhouse gases• For adaptation to climate variability- Terraces- Water retention ditches- Residue management- Mulch- Composting- Controlled grazing- Crop rotation- Cover crops- Improved fallows- Nitrogen fixing treesintercropped
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanKACP – save space and secure food>80% smallholders (Farmsize:0.7 ha in Kisumu; 1.1 ha inKitale)Multi-functionality ofagroforestry• Ecosystem services• Hign productivity• Food security• Sustainability• Resilient landscapeFor every hectare put intoagroforestry alternatives, five toten hectares can be saved(ICRAF).Diversification of a farmingsystem is very important in caseweather or market is unreliableor if pests attack the products.Agroforestry diversifies thetiming of production so thatfarmers do not receive theirentire year’s income at one time.
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanHolistic approach in KACPFEDVS&LASALMSALM=SustainableAgricultural and Landuse ManagementFED: FarmEnterpriseDevelopmentVS&LA: VillageSavings and LoanAssociations
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanKey methodology features:Generic and can be scaled upModel approach with activity-basedmonitoringThe model is 4-5 cheaper than soilsampling, minimizing transaction costsand helps farmers to reach theirobjectivesLong-term research in Kenya confirmsmodel applicabilityNon-soil modules (using approvedCDM AR methodologies for tree carbon)Methodology submitted to VerifiedCarbon Standard (VCS):Methodology development
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanKML filesDatabaseGISFarm polygonKACP – precision in MRV
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanKACP and food security0%10%20%30%40%50%60%2009 2010 2011Percent of household sexperiencing increased foodsecurity due to SALMKACP shows yields increasedby 15 – 30 %
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanTrees on agricultural land is increasingSource: Vi Agroforestry (2011)0102030405060702009 2010 2011Avg no of trees on cropland
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, DurbanConclusion/RecommendationsKACP show that carbon payments can be wellintegrated into projects promoting sustainableagricultural developmentExtension and advisory services prerequisitefor successful implementation and needs moreattention and fundingBottom up and participatory approaches givesbest resultsCarbon finance should leverage climate smartagricultureTraining and capacity building for projectentities is essentialMerge adaptation and mitigation fundingCombine financing from public and privatesources
  • Amos Wekesa, Vi Agroforestry COP17, Durban