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Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia
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Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia

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Presented at the Agri4D 2013 conference at the session on Transforming Gender Roles in Agriculture: - Ways Forward

Presented at the Agri4D 2013 conference at the session on Transforming Gender Roles in Agriculture: - Ways Forward

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  • 1. Conference Agricultural Research Towards Sustainable Development Goals Session Transforming Gender Roles in Agriculture: A Diversity of Approaches Overcoming inequalities without challenging women’s loyalty to the indigenous community - Case study in the Indigenous Community Nasa Kiwe, Colombia Blanca Sandoval Department of Urban and Rural Development Master’s Thesis Rural Development and Natural Resource Management - Master’s Programme Uppsala 2013 September 26 2013
  • 2. Content 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Background Research questions Theorethical framework Methodology and methods Cases Conclusions
  • 3. 1. Background The indigenous community Nasa Kiwe To Cali city, Valle´s capital Nuevo México National road La María Santander town Quitapereza To Popayán city, Cauca´s capital Santander municipality Nuevo México Colombia Cauca department
  • 4. General assembly Manifestation against gold mining Communitarian work in a communal aloe vera crop
  • 5. 2. Research questions How do women bring up questions of gender inequalities vis a vis men without challenging their loyalty to an indigenous community? 1. How do women participate in the social and political life? 2. How are unequal power relations perpetuated? 3. How do indigenous women envision their involvement in the social and political life?
  • 6. 3. Theoretical framework Feminist and postcolonial literature: • Gender and women´s agency, Seema Arora-Jonsson • Cultural relativism and colonial discourse, Chandra Mohanty, Maria Mies & Vandana Shiva, Melissa Marie Forbis • Gender and ethnicity, Astrid Ulloa, Olga Luz Restrepo • Participation, Susan Senecah, Georgina Méndez, Lynn Stephen • Development, Sarah Radcliffe & Andrea Pequeño
  • 7. 4. Methodology and methods • Qualitative research – Participant observation in 15 events – 10 unstructured interviews – Informal conversations – One survey • Discourse analysis
  • 8. 5. Cases of analysis 1. Creation of the Community Nasa Kiwe 2. The committe of water supply in Nuevo México 3. Training sesions of the Regional Program of Woman 4. Activities of the Program of Woman Nasa Wike: – Restaurant project – Cattle breeding proposal
  • 9. 3. Training sesions of the Regional Program of Woman Women´s analysis about gold mining impacts in their territories This was one way to elucidate inequalities: – Unequal distribution of land – Difficulties for women to access credits – Technical language coined by men limits communication – Low political influence of women on their indigenous authorities –mainly men
  • 10. 6. Conclusions How do women bring up questions of gender inequalities vis a vis men without challenging their loyalty to an indigenous community? Men and women are committed to their culture and political struggles. There are inequalities that limit women´s participation in the public sphere.
  • 11. Women´s personal agency, limited by:  Women´s for political discussion are belittled (women gossip and men discuss)  Attributes of men and women frame their participation – Women: Reserved and supportive – Men: Talkative and leader  Technical language limits communication.
  • 12. Women´s collective agency, limited by:  Dominant discourses of broader struggles.  Formal compromises on which a group is founded.  Discourse colonization of blaming the outsider.
  • 13. Women envision: Relationships between men and women in equilibrium, and with the nature, without discriminations. A better exercise of the social and political life of communities. Wish to strengthen their involvement in the public life.
  • 14. Thanks for your attention!

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