• Save
19th Ave Transit Study Fall 2013 Presentation and Survey
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

19th Ave Transit Study Fall 2013 Presentation and Survey

on

  • 3,812 views

This presentation contains information about the 19th Avenue Transit Study, a feasibility Study being led by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority that considers changes to the M-Ocean ...

This presentation contains information about the 19th Avenue Transit Study, a feasibility Study being led by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority that considers changes to the M-Ocean View light rail and 19th Avenue corridor in southwest San Francisco. The presentation is being used to assist with public outreach being conducted in Fall 2013. After viewing the presentation, you are invited to complete a short survey at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/19thsurvey

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,812
Views on SlideShare
550
Embed Views
3,262

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

5 Embeds 3,262

http://www.sfcta.org 3247
https://www.google.com 6
http://sfcta.org 5
http://www.google.com 3
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Welcome to the 19th Avenue Transit Study Self-Guided Presentation and Survey! This presentation has been designed to share the same content that will be shared at public meetings and presentations during round two of outreach in Fall 2013. The 19th Avenue Transit Study builds on recent planning efforts to develop plansfor a west-side, grade-separated (i.e. partial subway, tunnel, or bridge) alignment of the M-Ocean View light rail as it traverses 19th Avenue between St. Francis Circle and Broad at Orizaba. The purpose of the Study is to determine the feasibility, benefits, and impacts of such an investment, guided by a framework of eight goals that set out to benefit conditions for all 19th Avenue travelers as well as neighboring residences, businesses, and institutions. After reviewing this content, you will be asked to answer several questions. Your input is critical to informing the Study’s recommendations and next steps!You can also learn more at the Study website at www.sfcta.org/19thave.
  • The origin of the Study dates back to some land use decisions that were made several years ago. In 2008, the Board of Supervisors requested the San Francisco Planning Department to conduct the 19th Avenue Corridor Study to analyze the cumulative impacts of plans for increased land use intensity at San Francisco State University, Parkmerced and other potential future developments in the vicinity of 19th Avenue. Corridor stakeholders, including community members from West Portal, Lakeside, SF State, Parkmerced, Merced Heights, Merced Extension Triangle, Ingleside Heights, and Ocean View helped the city set goals and infrastructure investment priorities to improve existing conditions and support future plans.
  • A version of these priorities are already committed to in the Development Agreement between the City and County of San Francisco and Parkmerced. The agreement calls for Parkmerced to build a new segment of the M-Ocean View by crossing 19th Avenue at-grade twice: at 19th Avenue/ Holloway and at 19th Avenue/Junipero Serra, an infrastructure investment valued at $70 million.
  • While this investment would help address strong and safe transit access for SF State and Parkmerced, it would also make travel time on the M-Ocean View slower, and increase traffic congestion on 19th Avenue. To mitigate traffic congestion, the Development Agreement between Parkmerced and the City and County of San Francisco calls for addition of travel and turn lanes on 19th Avenue between Holloway and Junipero Serra. During the Parkmerced transportation planning process, there was a recognition that this funding might be better spent in support of a bigger and better project that would require a collective investment to implement. In particular, the idea of taking the M-Ocean View over or under the street in a bridge or subway was thought to be a potential way to avoid adding lanes to the road, provide faster M-Ocean View travel time, and allow for a safer and more attractive pedestrian environment. The Development Agreement set aside provisions to allow a larger vision for the M-Ocean View and 19th Avenue to be studied before finalizing the decision about how the $70 million will be invested. The current 19th Avenue Transit Study is the opportunity to study such a larger investment. The Development Agreement gives San Francisco until July 2018 to complete environmental review of such a larger investment.
  • As a result, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority applied for and won a planning grant to study and develop feasible options, as well as their potential benefits and impacts. The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) awarded funding to conduct the 19th Avenue Transit Study, with local matching funds provided by the Prop K half-cent transportation sales tax, as well as contributions from the major landowning stakeholders of Parkmerced, San Francisco State University, and General Growth Properties (owners of Stonestown Galleria). The Study is a collaboration between these funding partners as well as in close cooperation with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (owners and operators of Muni), the San Francisco Planning Department, the Mayor’s Office of Economic and Workforce Development, and BART.The Study has been underway since Spring, 2012. After doing a comprehensive technical assessment of needs, the team generated multiple conceptual alternatives. In February 2013, the Study team hosted its first round of public outreach, sharing these alternatives for public input. Since that time, some alternatives have been removed from consideration or modified based on that input. The remaining alternatives have been carefully evaluated to understand how well each would achieve the Study’s goals. With this information now available, the Study team is seeking input on community preferences among these options.
  • Eight goals have guided the development and evaluation of options.
  • The conceptual alternatives evaluated benefited from a thorough round of community vetting in winter/spring 2013. While a more detailed account of the first round of community feedback is available in an Outreach Summary at www.sfcta.org/19thAve, the most common points of feedback that are reflected in the conceptual alternatives still under consideration include: “Some of these options do not work for my neighborhood.” During the first round of outreach, a notable majority of those participating voiced concern with one of the northern crossing options that would have built a light rail bridge over the roadway (N4). In addition, a notable majority voiced concern with one of the southern crossing options that would have tunneled under Junipero Serra Way and continue on the north side of Brotherhood Way (S3).
  • The conceptual alternatives evaluated benefited from a thorough round of community vetting in winter/spring 2013. While a more detailed account of the first round of community feedback is available in an Outreach Summary at www.sfcta.org/19thAve, the most common points of feedback that are reflected in the conceptual alternatives still under consideration include: “Some of these options do not work for my neighborhood.” During the first round of outreach, a notable majority of those participating voiced concern with one of the northern crossing options that would have built a light rail bridge over the roadway (N4). In addition, a notable majority voiced concern with one of the southern crossing options that would have tunneled under Junipero Serra Way and continue on the north side of Brotherhood Way (S3).
  • A common criticism of the longer subway option (N1) was that it considered a pedestrian bridge over 19th Avenue to provide east-side connectivity from Wyton Lane to a new northern location of the SF State station. Many expressed concern that such a structure would not support the character of the existing neighborhood.
  • We found that an at-grade, signalized crossing at this location would be feasible from a traffic perspective, and have changed the option accordingly.
  • We received a lot of feedback on other ideas to explore. Four of the most common suggestions included: 1) starting the subway in West Portal, 2) starting the subway before St. Francis Circle, 3) including a subway station at Ocean Avenue, and 4) continuing the subway through the entirety of SF State and Parkmerced.
  • The Study team completed a preliminary assessment of these common variants. The Study team will be interested in additional feedback on these options to determine whether a more comprehensive evaluation of any are merited in future phases of this project or as separate community planning efforts.
  • Two conceptual alternatives are under consideration in comparison to the Baseline that represents the currently agreed to plan to re-align the M-Ocean View through Parkmerced. In the northern part of the corridor, both alternatives travel as a subway from south of St. Francis Circle through Stonestown, but vary in the point at which they surface. In the southern part of the corridor, one option would go under the intersection of 19th Avenue and Junipero Serra Boulevard in a light rail tunnel and continue on 19th Avenue and Randolph Street. The other would follow Font Boulevard in Parkmerced to a light rail bridge over Junipero Serra Boulevard and continue on Randolph Street. The two northern and two southern options have been combined to create two full project alternatives for evaluation: Longer Subway and Bridge, and Shorter Subway and Tunnel.
  • The Longer Subway and Bridge alternativehas been to determined to perform better again the Study’s goals.
  • The Longer Subway and Bridge option provides these key benefits.
  • The next images show visuals of the Longer Subway and Bridge alternative at various points throughout the corridor. Each green shaded area has a corresponding visual that will be shown, from north to south. The next slide will show an images of the M-Ocean View in the Lakeside neighborhood between St. Francis Circle and Eucalyptus.
  • This image shows the M-Ocean View traveling through the Lakeside neighborhood today: St. Francis Circle is in the bottom right corner, and 19th Avenue is just past the left extent of the photo.
  • This image shows how a portal might be constructed to transition the M-Ocean View underground. Note another option we will continue to study brings the M-Ocean View underground just before St. Francis Circle, in which case the train would be fully underground in the Lakeside. This phase of the Study will not make final decisions about how space freed up from the light rail will be re-purposed; however, one idea that has been discussed is that the space freed up could be closed to public access, eliminating the graffiti/vandalism issue that currently exists in the neighborhood.
  • The next image shows a concept for a new Stonestown/Mercy High School station moved north from the current station at Winston Drive.
  • Today 19th Avenue betweenStonestown Galleria and Mercy High School has: 3 travel lanes in each direction, a northbound turn lane, and two center-running light rail tracks.
  • With the Longer Subway and Bridge alternative, the light rail tracks move underground, with station entry points from both sides of the street. The new station would also provide a direct walking connection between Mercy High School and the Stonestown Galleria, a high demand crossing location that is currently closed.
  • The next images show how the Longer Subway and Bridge alternative might look in front of San Francisco State University.
  • With removal of on-street parking and re-location of the M-Ocean View tracks, a lot of street space becomes available to re-purpose.
  • This concept plan shows the space re-purposed for wider sidewalks, larger bus stops, and a landscaped, median and pedestrian refuge. The image also shows the SF State station moved somewhat north of Holloway, adjacent to new San Francisco State University (SF State) buildings that are planned to replace the HSS and Science buildings. However, the SF State station could be located anywhere between the location shown, and a location south, between Holloway and Crespi. Ultimately, the M-Ocean View/19th Avenue improvements are expected to precede the replacement of the SF State buildings.
  • The proposed changes in front of San Francisco State University (SF State) also contemplate re-directing westbound Holloway traffic to a re-aligned Crespi east of 19th Avenue. This would make M-Ocean View travel faster and more reliable and support SF State’s desire to transform Holloway into a pedestrian-oriented campus main street. Vehicles traveling through the area would be directed to Crespi and ultimately be able to connect back to Holloway further west of campus. In addition, such a change would make for a safer crossing across 19th Avenue at Holloway because it would eliminate conflicts between pedestrians crossing 19th Avenue and vehicles making northbound left-turns.
  • In cross section view, the M-Ocean View at 19th Avenue in front of San Francisco State University looks like this today.
  • And would change to look more like this in the future with the Northbound/Inbound track underground.
  • South of Junipero Serra, a segment of 19th Avenue that currently has light rail on it would no longer have it in the future.
  • The street would go from looking like this, as it does today…
  • …To a different, calmed and greened look. This image contemplates a landscaped median and narrowed travelways with angled parking. However, other options that will be explored further in subsequent phases might include wider sidewalks and/or an improved bike lane or bike treatment.
  • The next image discusses the bridge that would connect Parkmerced and Ingleside Heights.
  • To build such a bridge, Junipero Serra would be lowered by about 10.5 feet (the red line shows the current street level). The street lowering would reduce traffic noise nearby. The bridge would serve both the M-Ocean View, as well as walkers and cyclists. In the next phase, the Study team will work closely with the neighbors along Randolph to design the street where a bridge would land. Technical work during this phase has indicated that the bridge would fit fully in the public right-of-way, and vehicle access to all driveways would be maintained, although on-street parking would need to be removed. The bridge is an opportunity to create an iconic visual treatment at the southern entrance to San Francisco. The aesthetics of the bridge would be determined at a later phase, through a community process.
  • The last image shows a view of Randolph near Arch Street.
  • Today, the street looks like this.
  • In the future, an upgraded station could extend the sidewalk out into the street, providing level boarding for all users.
  • The Longer Subway and Bridge alternative would reduce the annual cost to run the M-Ocean View by about $2 million as compared to what it would cost to run the future Baseline alignment through Parkmerced. Because a capital project explored here would come with a long useful project life of 80-100 years, a savings every year starts to add up to be quite substantial. The most likely capital cost for the Longer Subway and Bridge alternative is about $520 million. The Shorter Subway is $90 million less expensive, but results in less than 50% of the operating cost savings as the Longer Subway.
  • Project additions shown here were suggested during the first round of outreach as well as in past planning efforts. Those outlined in blue will be studied further in the next phase. The others would require their own separate community planning processes to advance because their project boundaries are outside the Study area the work is focused on. In the case of the West Portal subway, it is not yet clear there is strong community support for such an improvement (such an idea was rejected when BART build the Muni Metro subway), but if there is, a separate community process would be needed to understand benefits and impacts. In the case of enhanced connections to Daly City BART, the M-Ocean View grade-separation options all are consistent with future enhanced connections to Daly City BART. Because of the Development Agreement timeline and large potential benefits, the next phase will focus on the grade-separation project. The next slide shares more about different options for such an enhanced connection.
  • Two options were considered. The first would extend the M-Ocean View to Daly City BART, traveling in a bridge in the median of Junipero Serra and rising over I-280 to land in the BART parking lot. This alignment would require removal or replacement of the Alemany flyover. The other option would route buses through Parkmerced to avoid future traffic congestion forecast on Junipero Serra, and create a bus-only lane on John Daly Boulevard.
  • Relative to the travel time it takes buses/shuttles today (about 6-13 minutes depending on congestion), the rail connection would decrease travel time by 1-8 minutes (for a 5 minute trip), while the enhanced bus connection would only shave time off the high-end time (for a 6-11 minute trip). The light rail connection would increase Muni’s operating costs by about $300,000/year but potentially save SF State and Parkmreced up to $800,000/year if the new service allowed for shuttles to no longer need to run. Saving two minutes/day/trip could save up to $400,000 in Muni operations.
  • This phase of Study is expected to be complete around the end of the calendar year. The next phase, conceptual design, will answer some questions this phase has not, as well as complete a Project Study Report, a requirement for projects affecting the State Highway System. After, the project will conduct a thorough analysis of the proposed project’s impacts on the environment, identifying mitigations for any significant impacts. Then, the project would entire detailed design and construction, with actual construction duration expected to last between two and three-and-a-half years, after which the project would be ready to open for service.
  • This is the end of the slideshow.

19th Ave Transit Study Fall 2013 Presentation and Survey 19th Ave Transit Study Fall 2013 Presentation and Survey Presentation Transcript

  • 19th Avenue Transit Study Self-Guided Presentation and Survey September/October, 2013 www.sfcta.org/19thave | 415.522.4838 | liz@sfcta.org Welcome to the 19th Avenue Transit Study Self-Guided Presentation and Survey! This presentation has been designed to share the same content that will be shared at public meetings and presentations during round two of outreach in Fall 2013. The 19th Avenue Transit Study builds on recent planning efforts to develop plans for a west-side, grade-separated (i.e. partial subway, tunnel, or bridge) alignment of the M-Ocean View light rail as it traverses the neighborhoods surrounding 19th Avenue between St. Francis Circle and Broad at Orizaba. The purpose of the Study is to determine the feasibility, benefits, and impacts of such an investment, guided by a framework of eight goals all centered on improving conditions for all 19th Avenue travelers as well as neighboring residences, businesses, and institutions. After reviewing this content, you will be asked to answer several questions. Your input is critical to informing the Study’s recommendations and next steps! You can expect to spend 30 minutes reviewing materials and answering the questions. You can also learn more at the Study website at www.sfcta.org/19thave.
  • 2 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The origin of the Study dates back to land use decisions that were made several years ago. In 2008, the Board of Supervisors requested that the San Francisco Planning Department conduct the 19th Avenue Corridor Study to analyze the cumulative impacts of plans for increased land use intensity at San Francisco State University, Parkmerced and other potential future developments in the vicinity of 19th Avenue. Corridor stakeholders, including community members from West Portal, Lakeside, SF State, Parkmerced, Merced Heights, Merced Extension Triangle, Ingleside Heights, and Ocean View helped the city set goals and infrastructure investment priorities to improve existing conditions and support future plans. Source left to right: SF State Campus Master Plan, SF Planning 19th Avenue Corridor Study, Parkmerced Transportation Plan
  • 3 New locations where light rail crosses Highway 1 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The city already committed to a version of these priorities in the Parkmerced Development Agreement. The agreement calls for Parkmerced to build a new segment of the M-Ocean View by crossing 19th Avenue at-grade twice: at 19th Avenue/ Holloway and at 19th Avenue/Junipero Serra, an infrastructure investment valued at $70 million. Source: Parkmerced Transportation Plan
  • 4 Fourth Southbound Travel Lane How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps While this investment would help address strong and safe transit access for SF State and Parkmerced, it would also make travel time on the M-Ocean View longer, and increase traffic congestion on 19th Avenue. To mitigate traffic congestion, the Development Agreement between Parkmerced and San Francisco calls for the addition of a southbound lane on 19th Avenue between Holloway and Junipero Serra and a third northbound left-turn lane at 19th/Junipero Serra. During the Parkmerced transportation planning process, there was recognition that this funding might be better spent in support of a project to take the M-Ocean View over or under the street in a bridge or subway, avoiding the need to add lanes, providing faster transit, and allowing for a safer, more attractive pedestrian environment. The Development Agreement set aside provisions to allow a larger vision for the M-Ocean View and 19th Avenue to be studied before finalizing the decision about how the $70 million will be invested. The current 19th Avenue Transit Study is the opportunity to study such a larger investment. The Development Agreement gives San Francisco until July 2018 to complete environmental review of such a larger investment. Credit: Top: Office of Cheryl Barton; Bottom: Parkmerced Transportation Plan
  • 5 The San Francisco County Transportation Authority applied for and won a planning grant to develop feasible options, and analyze potential benefits and impacts. The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) awarded funding to conduct the 19th Avenue Transit Study, with local matching funds provided by the Prop K half-cent transportation sales tax, and contributions from the major landowning stakeholders of Parkmerced, San Francisco State University, and General Growth Properties (owners of Stonestown Galleria). The Study is a collaboration between these funding partners, in close cooperation with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (owners and operators of Muni), the San Francisco Planning Department, the Mayor’s Office of Economic and Workforce Development, and BART. A team of technical consultants have also assisted with the Study’s work: Arup (lead), Fehr & Peers (traffic analysis), Office of Cheryl Barton (landscape architecture), Circlepoint (outreach) How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps
  • 6 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The Study has been underway since Spring, 2012. After doing a comprehensive technical assessment of needs, the team generated multiple conceptual alternatives. In February 2013, the Study team hosted its first round of public outreach, sharing these alternatives for public input. Since that time, some alternatives have been removed from consideration or modified based on that input. The remaining alternatives have been carefully evaluated to understand how well each would achieve the Study’s goals. With this information now available, the Study team is seeking input on community preferences among these options.
  • 7 Planning Goals Framework How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Eight goals have guided the development and evaluation of options. 19th Avenue Transit Study M-Ocean View speed, reliability, capacity M-Ocean View access, passenger experience Bus shuttle speed, reliability, access Attractive, safe, walking and cycling conditions Reliability of private vehicle travel Sense of place, neighbor- hood quality of life Transit- oriented land use Community, supported, feasible project
  • 8 What we heard…. These ideas don’t work for my neighborhood… How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps During the first round of outreach, a notable majority of those participating voiced concern with one of the northern crossing options that would have built a light rail bridge over the roadway (N4). In addition, a notable majority voiced concern with one of the southern crossing options that would have tunneled under Junipero Serra Boulevard and continue on the north side of Brotherhood Way (S3).
  • 9 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps What we did… The Study team dropped these options from further consideration at the close of the first round of outreach.
  • 10 What we heard…. I don’t like one part of this idea… How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps A common criticism of the longer subway option was that it considered a pedestrian bridge over 19th Avenue to provide east-side connectivity from Wyton Lane to a new northern location of the SF State station. Many expressed concern that such a structure would not support the character of the existing neighborhood.
  • 11 What we did…. How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps We found that an at-grade, signalized crossing at this location would be feasible from a traffic perspective, and have changed the option accordingly.
  • 12 What we heard…. I have another idea… How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps We received a lot of feedback on other ideas to explore. Four of the most common suggestions included: 1) starting the subway in West Portal, 2) starting the subway before St. Francis Circle, 3) including a subway station at Ocean Avenue, and 4) continuing the subway through the entirety of SF State and Parkmerced.
  • 13 What we did…. Highest- Performing Option > Daly City 1 2 3 4 5 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The Study team completed a preliminary assessment of these common variants. The Study team will be interested in additional feedback on these options to determine whether a more comprehensive evaluation of any are merited in future phases of this project or as separate community planning efforts.
  • 14 Baseline Longer Subway and Bridge Shorter Subway and Tunnel Below ground/subway At grade/street level Above ground/bridge Tail track (used for trains running a shorter route between Downtown and Parkmerced) Range of potential station location How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Three alternatives are still under consideration.
  • 15 Below ground/subway At grade/street level Above ground/bridge Tail track (used for “short” trains to run only between Downtown and Parkmerced) Longer Subway and Bridge Range of potential station location How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The Longer Subway and Bridge alternative has been to determined to perform better again the Study’s goals.
  • 16 Longer Subway performs better than Shorter Subway because: • Faster and more reliable light rail, bus, shuttle travel time • More space available to widen sidewalks and improve pedestrian and bicycle comfort and safety • Costs $90 million more in capital, but saves $1.1 million/year more in operating costs Southern bridge, Parkmerced-Ingleside Hts performs better than tunnel because: • Faster light rail travel time • Creates a new bike/ped link • Costs $160 million less How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps
  • 17 Key Benefits How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The Longer Subway and Bridge option provides these key benefits. Longer Subway and Bridge 35-45% faster M- Ocean View travel time in corridor; $2 million/ year operating cost savings 30-50ft for wider sidewalks, bus stops, medians Four new places to cross the street Distance across the street from 120 to <80 ft Enable 3- car trains through Parkmerced; future flexibility Reductions in light rail, traffic noise in some locations More reliable vehicle travel
  • 18 Longer Subway and Bridge Below ground/subway At grade/street level Above ground/bridge Tail track (used for “short” trains to run only between Downtown and Parkmerced) Range of potential station location The next images show visuals of the Longer Subway and Bridge alternative at various points throughout the corridor. Each green shaded area has a corresponding visual that will be shown, from north to south. The next slide will show an images of the M- Ocean View in the Lakeside neighborhood between St. Francis Circle and Eucalyptus. How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps
  • 19 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps This image shows the M-Ocean View traveling through the Lakeside neighborhood today: St. Francis Circle is in the bottom right corner, and 19th Avenue is just past the left extent of the photo. Source: 2013 Microsoft Corporation Pictometry Bird’s Eye @2012 Pictometry International Corporation.
  • 20 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps This image shows how a portal might be constructed to transition the M-Ocean View underground. Note another option we will continue to study brings the M-Ocean View underground just before St. Francis Circle, in which case the train would be fully underground in the Lakeside. This phase of the Study will not make final decisions about how space freed up from the light rail will be re-purposed; however, one idea that has been discussed is that the space freed up could be closed to public access, eliminating the graffiti/vandalism issue that currently exists in the neighborhood. Underlying source: 2013 Microsoft Corporation Pictometry Bird’s Eye @2012 Pictometry International Corporation.
  • 21 Longer Subway and Bridge Below ground/subway At grade/street level Above ground/bridge Tail track (used for “short” trains to run only between Downtown and Parkmerced) Range of potential station location How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The next image shows a concept for a new Stonestown/Mercy High School station moved north from the current station at Winston Drive.
  • 22 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Today 19th Avenue between Stonestown Galleria and Mercy High School has: 3 travel lanes in each direction, a northbound turn lane, and two center-running light rail tracks.
  • 23 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps With the Longer Subway and Bridge alternative, the light rail tracks move underground, with station entry points from both sides of the street. The new station would also provide a direct walking connection between Mercy High School and the Stonestown Galleria, a high demand crossing location that is currently closed.
  • 24 Longer Subway and Bridge Below ground/subway At grade/street level Above ground/bridge Tail track (used for “short” trains to run only between Downtown and Parkmerced) Range of potential station location How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The next images show how the Longer Subway and Bridge alternative might look in front of San Francisco State University.
  • 25 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Today 19th Avenue and Holloway is a very high-activity pedestrian and transit node; riders must cross 3 travel lanes and a bus loading area to get to/from campus. During peak hours crossing guards enforce when transit riders can cross to reduce the temptation to run across the street against the light to catch your train or get to class Source: 2013 Digital Globe S Geological Survey, USDA Farm Service Agency: Map data 2013 Google
  • 26 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Range of potential station location The change creates an opportunity for wider sidewalks, larger bus stops, and a landscaped, median and pedestrian refuge. The SF State station could be located anywhere between the location shown, and a location south, between Holloway and Crespi. Underlying aerial source: 2013 Digital Globe S Geological Survey, USDA Farm Service Agency: Map data 2013 Google
  • 27 The proposed also contemplates re-directing westbound Holloway traffic to a re-aligned Crespi east of 19th Avenue. Vehicles traveling through the area would be directed to Crespi be able to connect back to Holloway west of 19th. This change would make for a safer crossing across 19th Avenue at Holloway because it would eliminate conflicts between pedestrians crossing 19th Avenue and vehicles making northbound left-turns. It would also support faster light rail travel time. 27 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps
  • 28 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps In cross section view, the M-Ocean View at 19th Avenue in front of San Francisco State University looks like this today.
  • 29 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps It would change to look more like this in the future with the Northbound/Inbound track underground.
  • 30 Longer Subway and Bridge Below ground/subway At grade/street level Above ground/bridge Tail track (used for “short” trains to run only between Downtown and Parkmerced) Range of potential station location How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps South of Junipero Serra, a segment of 19th Avenue that currently has light rail on it would no longer have it in the future.
  • 31 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The street would go from looking like this, as it does today… Source: 2013 Google Image Date: April 2011, Google Street View
  • 32 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps …To a different, calmed and greened look. This image contemplates a landscaped median and narrowed travel-ways with angled parking. However, other options that will be explored further in subsequent phases might include wider sidewalks and/or an improved bike lane or bike treatment. Underlying source: 2013 Google Image Date: April 2011, Google Street View
  • 33 Longer Subway and Bridge Below ground/subway At grade/street level Above ground/bridge Tail track (used for “short” trains to run only between Downtown and Parkmerced) Range of potential station location How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The next image discusses the bridge that would connect Parkmerced and Ingleside Heights.
  • 34 Photo Credits: left, Arup; center: Craig Philpott; right: Melanie Curry How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps To build such a bridge, Junipero Serra would be lowered by about 10.5 feet (the red line shows the current street level). The street lowering would reduce traffic noise nearby. The bridge would serve both the M-Ocean View, as well as walkers and cyclists. In the next phase, the Study team will work closely with the neighbors along Randolph to design the street where the bridge would land. Technical work during this phase has indicated that the bridge would fit fully in the public right-of- way, and vehicle access to all driveways would be maintained, although on-street parking would need to be removed. The bridge is an opportunity to create an iconic visual treatment at the southern entrance to San Francisco. The aesthetics of the bridge would be determined at a later phase, through a community process.
  • 35 Longer Subway and Bridge Below ground/subway At grade/street level Above ground/bridge Tail track (used for “short” trains to run only between Downtown and Parkmerced) Range of potential station location How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps The last image shows a view of Randolph near Arch Street.
  • 36 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Today, the street looks like this. Ssource: 2013 Google Image Date: April 2011, Google Street View
  • 37 In the future, an upgraded station could extend the sidewalk out into the street, providing level boarding for all users. How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Underlying source: 2013 Google Image Date: April 2011, Google Street View
  • 38 0.2 -1.8 -0.7 -2.0 -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 Baseline Longer Subway + Bridge Shorter Subway + Tunnel Net Change in Annual Operating Costs (in millions of 2013 $) Capital Cost, millions of 2013 $ Baseline $70 Longer Subway + Bridge $520 most likely ($420-$780) *$90 mil. difference between shorter and longer subway , $160 mil. difference between bridge and tunnel How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps *Does not include: change/increase in fare revenue, reduction in capital cost if fewer train sets are needed; systemwide average maintenance/station staffing costs included in operating cost changes The Longer Subway and Bridge alternative would reduce the annual cost to run the M-Ocean View by about $2 million as compared to what it would cost to run the future Baseline alignment through Parkmerced. Because a capital project explored here would come with a long useful project life of 80-100 years, a savings every year starts to add up to be quite substantial. The most likely capital cost for the Longer Subway and Bridge alternative is about $520 million. The Shorter Subway is $90 million less expensive, but results in less than 50% of the operating cost savings as the Longer Subway. Source: Arup, Level 5 Rough Order of Magnitude Costs developed in accordance with Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering Internal best practices, +30% soft costs
  • Travel time implication Capital Cost (2013 $) Subway through West Portal -2:25 to -2:50 +$400-800 M St. Francis Circle grade separation -1:40 +$40-60 M Subway station at Ocean Ave +0:25 +$40 M Subway through SF State/Parkmerced -0:25 to -1:50 +$90-180 M Create enhanced connection to Daly City BART -0-8:00 $30 M-$300 M 39 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps For continued Study in next phase Many project additions were suggested during the first round of outreach as well as in past planning efforts. Those outlined in blue will be studied further in the next phase. The others would require their own separate community planning processes to advance because their project boundaries are outside the Study area. In the case of the West Portal subway, it is not clear there is strong community support to study such an improvement (this idea was rejected when BART build the Muni Metro subway), but if there is, a separate community process would be needed to understand benefits and impacts. In the case of enhanced connections to Daly City BART, the M-Ocean View grade-separation options all are consistent with future enhanced connections to Daly City BART. Because of the Development Agreement timeline and large potential benefits of grade-separation project, the next phase will focus exclusively on this improvement. The next slide shares more about different options for such an enhanced connection.
  • 40 LRT extension: $200-300 m Bus/Shuttle Package: $30-40 m How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Two options were considered. The first would extend the M-Ocean View to Daly City BART, traveling in a bridge in the median of Junipero Serra and rising over I-280 to land in the BART parking lot. This alignment would require removal or replacement of the Alemany flyover ramp. The other option would route buses through Parkmerced to avoid future traffic congestion forecast on Junipero Serra, and create a bus-only lane on John Daly Boulevard.
  • 41 Rail Connection Criterion Enhanced Bus Connection 5 minutes Travel time: SF State to Daly City 6-11 minutes 1-8 minutes savings Potential Travel-Time Savings 0-2 minutes +$300k/year Muni; Potential decrease in shuttles $800k/yr Change in Operating Cost Potential Muni savings of $400k/year $200-300 million Capital Cost $30-40 million Travel time: SF State to Daly City Today: 6-13 minutes How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Relative to the travel time it takes buses/shuttles today (about 6-13 minutes depending on congestion), the rail connection would decrease travel time by 1-8 minutes (for a 5 minute trip), while the enhanced bus connection would only shave time off the high-end time (for a 6-11 minute trip). The light rail connection would increase Muni’s operating costs by about $300,000/year but potentially save SF State and Parkmerced up to $800,000/year if the new service were to fully replace their private shuttles to Daly City Station. Saving two minutes/trip could save up to $400,000 in Muni operations.
  • 42 How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps Open for Service Environmental Review and Preliminary Design (3-3.5 years) Conceptual Design (1 year) Final Design and Construction (4-6.5 years) Study Completion (by end of year) Potential implementation pathway for Longer Subway and Bridge alternative This phase of Study is expected to be complete around the end of the calendar year. The next phase, conceptual design, will answer some questions this phase has not, as well as complete a Project Study Report, a requirement for projects affecting the State Highway System. After, the project will conduct a thorough analysis of the proposed project’s impacts on the environment, identifying mitigations for any significant impacts. Then, the project would enter detailed design and construction, with actual construction duration expected to last between two and three-and-a- half years, after which the project would be ready to open for service.
  • 43 And now… the survey! Please visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/19thsurvey to share your input How We Got Here > What’s New > Next Steps