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Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa
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Wh Espey 021810 Setawwa

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  • 1. Overview of Texas Water Rights – Lower Trinity and San Jacinto Basins W.H. Espey February 18, 2010 Southeast Chapter of TAWWA
  • 2. Trinity River Survey Crew, Corps of Engineers, 1899
  • 3. Introduction  Surface water in Texas is owned by the state and held in trust for the citizens of the state and available for use pursuant to the statutory appropriation process:  Section 11.021(a) of the Texas Water Code provides: The water of the ordinary flow, underflow, and tides of every flowing river, natural stream, and lake, and of every bay or arm of the Gulf of Mexico, and the storm water, floodwater, and rainwater of every river, natural stream, canyon, ravine, depression, and watershed in the state is the property of the state.  It seems that there is plenty of water when you don’t need it, and never enough when you do.  And it’s easy to understand what was meant by the old expression, “Whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting.”
  • 4. Texas Water Rights - Doctrine  Riparian Doctrine – provide water rights are tied to the ownership of land bordering a natural river or stream.  Prior Appropriation Doctrine – water rights are acquired by compliance with statutory requirements. The Texas Legislature merged the riparian rights system into the prior appropriation system with the passage of the Water Rights Adjudication Act (1967).
  • 5. Permission to Use the State’s Water What Kinds of Water Rights Exist In Texas, there are a number of forms of appropriated water rights: “first in time, first in right”  Perpetual rights, including:  Certificates of adjudication  Permits  Limited-term rights, including:  Term permits  Temporary permits
  • 6. Exempt Uses There are several “exempt uses” in the Texas Water Code. These exempt uses allow anyone to use surface water without getting permission:  Domestic and livestock use  Wildlife management  Emergency use  Other specified uses
  • 7. Water Rights Permitting Process Suggested Review Notice Basin/ with TCEQ Effected Parties Technical Review Water Rights Administration Completed TCEQ Permit Application TCEQ Draft Permit TCEQ Protests Commission Public Contested TCEQ/Applicant/ TCEQ Commission State Office of Protestors - No Protests Action Administrative Hearings Resolution/Negotiations Unsuccessful Successful Recommendation Resolution
  • 8. Regional Water Planning Entities
  • 9. Texas Cities (Height Represents Population in 2000)
  • 10. Population Estimates from Water for Texas Water 2007 for Region C, Region H, and Texas
  • 11. Comparison of Water Demand Estimates Draft PPI - Region H – January 2010
  • 12. Major Surface Water Resources
  • 13. Current Surface Water Supply Sources
  • 14. Ownership of Lower Trinity River Basin Supplies
  • 15. Summary of Fixed Rights Agreements
  • 16. City of Houston Adjudicated Water Rights Lake Conroe Permitted Use Source Quantity Priority Date Reliability (%) Acre MGD Period Volume Ft/Yr. 10-4963 Municipal Lake Conroe (2) 44,000 39.3 January 12, 1959 98.25 98.25 Industrial Lake Conroe (2) 19,000 17 January 12, 1959 Mining Lake Conroe (2) 3,667 3.2 January 12, 1959 98.1 98.1 Sub-total 66,667 59.5 (1) Municipal, Industrial and Irrigation (Multiple Use) (2) Houston’s 2/3 undivided share by use (3) Run-of-river right included in Certificate of Adjudication No. 08-4261 with Lake Livingston and Wallisville. Purchased 1969. (4) Will change to multiple use on City of Houston purchase (municipal, industrial and irrigation)
  • 17. City of Houston Adjudicated Water Rights Lake Houston Permitted Use Source Quantity Priority Date Reliability (%) Acre MGD Period Volume Ft/Yr. 10-4965 Multiple Use Lake Houston (1) 112,000 100 May 7, 1940 100 100 Multiple Use Lake Houston (1) 56,000 50 February 26, 1944 100 100 10-5807 Multiple Use Lake Houston 14,100 12.6 December 3, 2008 100 100 185,100 182,100 162.6 (1) Municipal, Industrial and Irrigation (Multiple Use) (2) Houston’s 2/3 undivided share by use (3) Run-of-river right included in Certificate of Adjudication No. 08-4261 with Lake Livingston and Wallisville. Purchased 1969. (4) Will change to multiple use on City of Houston purchase (municipal, industrial and irrigation)
  • 18. City of Houston Adjudicated Water Rights Lake Livingston Permitted Use Source Quantity Priority Date Reliability (%) Acre MGD Period Volume Ft/Yr. 08-4261 Municipal Lake Livingston 444,000 396.4 September 23, 1959 99.12 99.13 Industrial Lake Livingston 458,800 409.6 September 23, 1959 98.83 98.95 Sub-total 902,800 806 (1) Municipal, Industrial and Irrigation (Multiple Use) (2) Houston’s 2/3 undivided share by use (3) Run-of-river right included in Certificate of Adjudication No. 08-4261 with Lake Livingston and Wallisville. Purchased 1969. (4) Will change to multiple use on City of Houston purchase (municipal, industrial and irrigation)
  • 19. CITY OF HOUSTON ADJUDICATED WATER RIGHTS Permitted Use Source Quantity Priority Date Reliability (%) Acre MGD Period Volume Ft/Yr. 10-4965 Multiple Use Lake Houston (1) 112,000 100 May 7, 1940 100 100 Lake Houston (1) 56,000 50 February 26, 1944 100 100 Sub-total 168,000 150 10-4963 Municipal Lake Conroe (2) 44,000 39.3 January 12, 1959 98.25 98.25 Industrial Lake Conroe (2) 19,000 17 January 12, 1959 98.1 98.1 Mining Lake Conroe (2) 3,667 3.2 January 12, 1959 Sub-total 66,667 59.5 98 10-5807 Multiple Use Lake Houston 14,100 12.6 December 3, 2008 100 100 10-5808 Multiple Use San Jacinto River 40,000 35.7 September 22, 2009 70 10-5826 Multiple Use Mult. Bayous (5) 160,000 14.3 New Application - - 10-5827 Reuse Buffalo Bayous (5) 594,000 53.0 New Application - - 08-4261 Municipal Lake Livingston 444,000 396.4 September 23, 1959 99.12 99.13 Industrial Lake Livingston 458,800 409.6 September 23, 1959 98.83 98.95 Sub-total 902,800 806 Municipal Wallisville 10,000 8.9 September 23, 1959 98.83 98.8 Industrial Wallisville 28,000 25 September 23, 1959 98.83 98.8 Sub-total 38,000 33.9 Industrial Southern Canal (3) 31,600 28.2 December 30, 1913 97.37 96.99 Irrigation Southern Canal (3) 13,400 12 December 30, 1913 96.49 93.32 Sub-total 45,000 40.2 08-4277 Irrigation Dayton Canal (4) 33,000 29.5 July 2, 1913 98.1 97.41 Irrigation Dayton Canal (4) 5,000 4.5 August 25, 1969 47.66 48.15 Sub-total 38,000 34 TOTALS 1,312,528 1,171.9 Notes: (1) Municipal, Industrial and Irrigation (Multiple Use) (2) Houston’s 2/3 undivided share by use (3) Run-of-river right included in Certificate of Adjudication No. 08-4261 with Lake Livingston and Wallisville. Purchased 1969. (4) Will change to multiple use on City of Houston purchase (municipal, industrial and irrigation) (5) Not included in total
  • 20. San Jacinto River Authority Adjudicated Water Rights Lake Conroe Permitted Use Source Quantity Priority Date Reliability (%) Acre MGD Period Volume Ft/Yr. 10-4963 Municipal (2) Lake Conroe 22,000 19.7 January 12, 1959 98.25 98.25 Industrial (2) Lake Conroe 9,500 8.5 January 12, 1959 98.1 98.1 Mining (2) Lake Conroe 1,833 1.6 January 12, 1959 Sub-total 33,333 29.8 98 (1) Municipal, Industrial and Irrigation (Multiple Use). Run-of-River Right Diverted at Lake Houston to East Canal (2) SJRA’s 1/3 undivided share by use (3) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (4) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (5) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (6) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Chambers-Liberty Counties Navigation District. Application to Amend Certificate of Adjudication to Multiple Use and an Exempt Inter-Basin Transfer is Pending.
  • 21. San Jacinto River Authority Adjudicated Water Rights Lake Houston Permitted Use Source Quantity Priority Date Reliability (%) Acre MGD Period Volume Ft/Yr. 10-4963 Municipal (2) Lake Conroe 22,000 19.7 January 12, 1959 98.25 98.25 Industrial (2) Lake Conroe 9,500 8.5 January 12, 1959 98.1 98.1 Mining (2) Lake Conroe 1,833 1.6 January 12, 1959 Sub-total 33,333 29.8 98 (1) Municipal, Industrial and Irrigation (Multiple Use). Run-of-River Right Diverted at Lake Houston to East Canal (2) SJRA’s 1/3 undivided share by use (3) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (4) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (5) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (6) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Chambers-Liberty Counties Navigation District. Application to Amend Certificate of Adjudication to Multiple Use and an Exempt Inter-Basin Transfer is Pending.
  • 22. SAN JACINTO RIVER AUTHORITY ADJUDICATED WATER RIGHTS Permitted Use Source Quantity Priority Date Reliability (%) Acre MGD Period Volume Ft/Yr. 10-4964 Multiple Use (1) San Jacinto River 55,000 49.1 July 25, 1942 81.29/73.98 81.89/78.84 10-4963 Municipal (2) Lake Conroe 22,000 19.7 January 12, 1959 98.25 98.25 Industrial (2) Lake Conroe 9,500 8.5 January 12, 1959 98.1 98.1 Mining (2) Lake Conroe 1,833 1.6 January 12, 1959 Sub-total 33,333 29.8 98 10-5807 Multiple Use Lake Houston 14,100 12.6 December 3, 2008 100 100 10-5808 Multiple Use San Jacinto River 40,000 35.7 September 22, 2009 70 10-5809 Reuse San Jacinto River 15,000 13.4 08-5271B Multiple Use (3) Trinity River 7,500 6.7 February 26, 1917 95 93.05 Multiple Use (3) Trinity River 20,000 17.9 September 8, 1926 94 91.71 Multiple Use (3) Trinity River 17,500 15.6 December 12, 1929 93 90.73 Municipal, Mining Trinity River 7,000 6.2 September 24, 1936 & Industrial (4) 93 90.53 Municipal & Trinity River 4,000 3.6 September 24, 1936 Industrial (5) Devers Sub-total 56,000 50 08-4279A Irrigation (6) Trinity River 30,000 26.8 June 26, 1914 81 83.02 TOTALS 243,433 217 Notes: (1) Municipal, Industrial and Irrigation (Multiple Use). Run-of-River Right Diverted at Lake Houston to East Canal (2) SJRA’s 1/3 undivided share by use (3) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (4) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (5) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Devers Canal System (6) Run-Of-River Right Purchased from Chambers-Liberty Counties Navigation District. Application to Amend Certificate of Adjudication to Multiple Use and an Exempt Inter-Basin Transfer is Pending.
  • 23. Environmental Flows
  • 24. Omnibus Water Bills  Senate Bill 1 - 1997  Established stakeholder driven approach to planning for water resources  Senate Bill 2 - 2001  Established Texas Instream Flow Program in recognition of the lack of available data for the determination of how much water is necessary for environment purposes  Senate Bill 3 - 2007  Established basin-by-basin process for developing recommendations to meet instream and freshwater inflow needs
  • 25. Background  TCEQ required by the Texas Water Code (TWC) to consider and provide for:  Balance biological soundness of state’s rivers, lakes, bays, and estuaries with public’s economic health and general well-being  Freshwater inflows necessary to maintain the viability of Texas’ bay and estuary systems  Historically Accomplished through:  Site Specific Studies  Special conditions applied to water right that consider environmental flows
  • 26. BBEST Legislative Mandate  “(m) Each basin and bay expert science team shall develop environmental flow analyses and a recommended environmental flow regime for the river basin and bay system for which the team is established through a collaborative process designed to achieve a consensus. In developing the analyses and recommendations, the science team must consider all reasonably available science, without regard to the need for the water for other uses, and the science team's recommendations must be based solely on the best science available.”  “(15) ‘Environmental flow analysis’ means the application of a scientifically derived process for predicting the response of an ecosystem to changes in instream flows or freshwater inflows.”  (16) "Environmental flow regime" means a schedule of flow quantities that reflects seasonal and yearly fluctuations that typically would vary geographically, by specific location in a watershed, and that are shown to be adequate to support a sound ecological environment and to maintain the productivity, extent, and persistence of key aquatic habitats in and along the affected water bodies.”
  • 27.  SB 3 recognizes there is a degree of uncertainty in the environmental flow regime that will be described and environmental flow standards that will be created. The legislation addresses that uncertainty by containing provisions for a continuing adaptive management process, a key component of SB 3, that can be applied to refine initially identified flow regimes as information (science) that confirms ecological – flow relationships required to support a sound ecological condition becomes available.
  • 28. Development of Environmental Flow Standards  The SB3 process requires TCEQ to consider recommendations from:  BBEST  Stakeholder Group  TCEQ will go through rulemaking process to develop environmental flow standards, to be utilized in decision-making process for  New water right applications  Amendments to existing applications
  • 29. Senate Bill 3 Architecture Environmental Flows Advisory Group TCEQ, TWDB, TPWD Staff Support Basin and Bay Basin/Bay Expert Texas Science Advisory Stakeholder Science Team Committee Committee Environmental Flow Regime Recommendation TCEQ Rulemaking Adaptive TCEQ Adopts Environmental Management Flow Regime
  • 30. Trinity-San Jacinto BBEST Process Basin/Bay Expert Science Team Public SAC Guidance, Liason TCEQ, TWDB, TPWD Technical Assistance Texas Science Advisory Committee Environmental Flow Recommendation Environmental Flows Stakeholder TCEQ Advisory Group Committee
  • 31. Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers and Galveston Bay Basin and Bay Expert Science Team (BBEST) Name Affiliation William H. Espey Jr., Ph.D., P.E., D. WRE - Chairman Espey Consultants, Inc. L. James Lester, Ph.D. - Vice Chair Houston Advanced Research Center Richard Browning, Ph.D. Trinity River Authority David Buzan PBS&J Woody Frossard Tarrant Regional Water District Environmental Institute of Houston, George Guillen, Ph.D. University of Houston Clear Lake Robert McFarlane, Ph.D. McFarlane & Associates Alan Plummer, P.E. Alan Plummer Associates, Inc. Antoniettea Quigg, Ph.D. Texas A&M University of Galveston Sammy Ray, Ph.D. Texas A&M University of Galveston Mike Reedy, P.E. Freese & Nichols, Inc. Tony L. Smith, P.E. Espey Consultants, Inc. Joe Trungale, P.E. Trungale Engineering & Science Mike Turco USGS Woody Woodrow USFWS Coastal Program
  • 32. General Water Availability
  • 33. Historical Water Quality of the Trinity River 16 14 12 10 mg/L 8 6 4 DO Grab DO Saturation 2 0 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005
  • 34. Trinity-San Jacinto BBEST  Trinity-San Jacinto BBEST has gone through a 12-month effort.  Recommendations submitted as a final report Dec. 1, 2009.
  • 35. Trinity River Watershed  Watershed covers ~18,000 sq. mi. and extends over 350 mi. inland from the Gulf.  Rainfall ranges from 55 in. near the coast to approximately 25 in. in the headwaters.  Contains the entire Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area of over 6,000,000 people.  Groundwater is generally limited in the basin.  For over 100 yrs. Surface water impoundments have been built to supply water for human use.  31 impoundments of over 5,000 ac-ft. with a total water supply storage capacity of over 7,000,000 ac-ft.
  • 36. Trinity River Watershed (cont’d)  Wastewater treatment in the DFW area is regionalized mostly into large wastewater treatment plants.  Wastewater treatment over the last 40 years has improved greatly to the extent that it is itself a valuable source of water supply.  Trinity River water quality has improved dramatically with the improvement in treatment.
  • 37. Trinity River Watershed (cont’d)  Low flows of the river have been increasing with the volume of treated wastewater for a hundred years.  These return flows have been permitted over the last 60 years for water supply.  Houston area and lower Trinity basin via Lake Livingston  Reuse in the DFW area.
  • 38. Historical Minimum 7-day Flows
  • 39. Preliminary Locations Analyzed
  • 40. Instream Flow Recommendation-1 Trinity at Oakwood Historic Qp: 24,600 cfs Historic Duration is 18 to 61 (Average: 33) Overbank DEFINITION: Overbank flows are naturally driven, infrequent, high magnitude flow events Flows that produce water levels that exceed channel banks and result in water entering the floodplain. BBEST does not recommend action be taken to produce such flows DEFINITION: High flow pulses are short duration, high magnitude (but still within channel) flow events that occur during or immediately following rainfall events. PURPOSE: The BBEST recognizes that high flow pulses provide an important ecological High Flow function to riverine habitat. Lacking specific ecological data, conditional flow Pulses magnitudes identified are an arbitrary representation of high flow pulses, and not a representation of the flow necessary to support a sound ecological environment until such supporting specific ecological data are developed. 265 at 322 at 186 at 162 at (91% over 41 yrs) (95% over 41 yrs) (85% over 41 yrs) (82% over 41 yrs) Base Flows DEFINITION: Base flows represent the range of "average" or "normal" flow conditions in the (cfs) absence of significant precipitation or runoff events. PURPOSE: Maintain typical occurrence and persistence of consecutive base flow days 98 at 80 at 75 at 85 at (100% over 41 yrs) (100% over 41 yrs) (97% over 41 yrs) (96% over 41 yrs) Subsistence Flows (cfs) DEFINITION: An atypical, short-duration (days to weeks) low flow event PURPOSE: Maintain historical occurrence and persistence, prevent development of poor water quality conditions Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Winter Spring Summer Fall
  • 41. Instream Flow Recommendation-2 Trinity at Oakwood Q: 24,600 cfs with Frequency 1 per 2 years Overbank  Volume is 626,471 Flows Duration is 26 Q: 15,000 cfs with Frequency 2 per year Volume is 326,119 Duration is 18 Q: 3,050 cfs with  Q: 11,200 cfs with  Q: 15,700 cfs with Frequency 1 per  Q: 2,930 cfs with Frequency  Frequency 1 per  High Flow  Frequency 1 per season season 1 per season season Pulses Volume is 257,289 Volume is 362,910 Volume is 26,246 Volume is 39,239 Duration is 14 Duration is 19 Duration is 5 Duration is 5 Q: 3,200 cfs with Frequency  Q: 7,840 cfs with Frequency 2 per  Q: 1,180 cfs with Frequency  2 per season season 2 per season Volume is 18,931 Volume is 141,705 Volume is 4,866 Duration is 5 Duration is 11 Duration is 2 1110 1398 682 819 Base Flows (cfs) 623 820 411 439 340 458 257 265 Subsistence  196 280 70 101 Flows (cfs) Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Winter Spring Summer Fall Wet F = Frequency (per season) Hydrologic  Average High Flow Pulse  D = Duration (days) Conditions Dry Characteristics Q = Peak Flows (cfs) Subsistence V = Volume (ac‐ft)
  • 42. Instream Flow Recommendation-2 (cont’d) Trinity at Oakwood  Base flow, Winter, Subsistence Condition: 196 cfs with attainment frequency of 95% of the time  Base flow, Winter, Dry Condition: 340 cfs with attainment frequency of 85% of the time  Base flow, Winter, Average Condition: 623 cfs with attainment frequency of 72% of the time  Base flow, Winter, Wet Condition: 1,110 cfs with attainment frequency of 58% of the time  Base flow, Spring, Subsistence Condition: 280 cfs with attainment frequency of 95% of the time  Base flow, Spring, Dry Condition: 458 cfs with attainment frequency of 89% of the time  Base flow, Spring, Average Condition: 820 cfs with attainment frequency of 79% of the time  Base flow, Spring, Wet Condition: 1,398 cfs with attainment frequency of 66% of the time  Base flow, Summer, Subsistence Condition: 70 cfs with attainment frequency of 95% of the time  Base flow, Summer, Dry Condition: 257 cfs with attainment frequency of 69% of the time  Base flow, Summer, Average Condition: 411 cfs with attainment frequency of 53% of the time  Base flow, Summer, Wet Condition: 682 cfs with attainment frequency of 36% of the time  Base flow, Fall, Subsistence Condition: 101 cfs with attainment frequency of 95% of the time  Base flow, Fall, Dry Condition: 265 cfs with attainment frequency of 73% of the time  Base flow, Fall, Average Condition: 439 cfs with attainment frequency of 57% of the time  Base flow, Fall, Wet Condition: 819 cfs with attainment frequency of 41% of the time
  • 43. Freshwater Inflows  Through guidance from the state Science Advisory Committee (SAC), focused upon salinity within the estuary as a “quintessential estuary parameter” Inflow Salinity Biology  Consensus on Salinity Zonation Approach within Galveston Bay  Organized subcommittee to develop and refine salinity-zonation approach on Galveston Bay  Invited experts on estuarine ecology from multiple agencies and Texas universities  Did not reach consensus upon application of approach for freshwater inflow recommendation
  • 44. Species Area Maps
  • 45. Proposed Environmental Flow Regimen - Galveston Bay Trinity Season Spring Summer Fall Winter Flow 742000 205000 141000 253000 Periodicity within season 1 of 3 mo. 2 of 3 mo. 2 of 3 mo. 1 of 3 mo. Periodicity among seasons 1 in 2 yrs. 1 in 2 yrs. 1 in 3 yrs. 1 in 2 yrs. San Jacinto Season Spring Summer Fall Winter Flow 302000 257000 250000 131000 Periodicity within season 1 of 3 mo. 2 of 3 mo. 1 of 3 mo. 1 of 3 mo. Periodicity among seasons 1 in 2 yrs. 1 in 5 yrs. 1 in 2 yrs. 1 in 2 yrs. Coastal Streams Season Spring Summer Fall Winter Flow 455000 196000 244000 84000 Periodicity within season 1 of 3 mo. 2 of 3 mo. 1 of 3 mo. 1 of 3 mo. Periodicity among seasons 1 in 2 yrs. 1 in 4 yrs. 1 in 4 yrs. 1 in 2 yrs. Plus Decadal Flood
  • 46. Adaptive Management  SB3 recognizes:  Individual river basins and estuarine areas have unique characteristics  Limited flow and ecological/biology relationship information available for specific water bodies for which flow regimes are to be established  Comprehensive searches were performed for the Trinity and San Jacinto River basins  Concluded there is limited information and data available to define flow and ecological/biology relationships for the basins  SB2 investigations are in the process of identifying information necessary to assess flow and ecological/biology relationships  BBEST, having gone through its process, identified what specific Trinity and San Jacinto River basin information needs to be developed through an adaptive management process
  • 47. Thank You

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