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2009-02-17 Seminar - Hurricane Ike   Houston Perspective
 

2009-02-17 Seminar - Hurricane Ike Houston Perspective

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Dannelle Belhateche, PE, Senior Assistant Director for the City of Houston's Department of Public Works and Engineering discusses lessons learned after Hurricane Ike where sustained power outages ...

Dannelle Belhateche, PE, Senior Assistant Director for the City of Houston's Department of Public Works and Engineering discusses lessons learned after Hurricane Ike where sustained power outages affected the drinking water quality and more.

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    2009-02-17 Seminar - Hurricane Ike   Houston Perspective 2009-02-17 Seminar - Hurricane Ike Houston Perspective Presentation Transcript

    • Hurricane Ike City of Houston y Drinking Water Perspective February 17, 2009 Texas AWWA Southeast Chapter Dannelle H. Belhateche, P E H Belhateche P.E. Department of Public Works and Engineering
    • Dannelle H. Belhateche, P.E. Senior Assistant Director Department of Public Works and Engineering
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking W D i ki Water Ordinary people doing extraordinary things What Wh t it means f a Utility to issue a - for Utilit t i “Boil Water Notice” What worked, what didn’t Life after
    • Hurricane Ike 9/13/08 2:10am: Galveston Landfall - Category 2 110 mph winds 2, Hobby Airport: sustained winds 74 mph, gusts 92 mph Bush Intercontinental Airport: sustained winds 64 mph, gusts 87 mph 112 deaths, 34 missing deaths Damages $27 billion ($8 billion in Houston)
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking W D i ki Water Who is Houston’s Drinking Water Team? Houston s Responsible for producing and distributing 385-mgd 385- of potable water to 2.8 million customers Operate and maintain production/treatment facilities State-of-the- State-of-the-Art Water Quality Laboratory – NELAC Certified Backflow/Cross Connection Programs Source Water Protection Process Optimization
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking W D i ki Water Who is Houston’s Drinking Water Team - cont? Houston s Staff comprised of: Currently 280 people, 342 fully staffed 75 degreed employees, 5 PhDs 12 registered P.E.s 85 State Licensed Operators, 7 Class A ce sed Ope ato s, C ass 3 Surface Water Treatment Plants - 500 MGD 75 Core Ground Water Plants - 200 MGD 6 Pressure Boosting/Re-Pump Stations Boosting/Re-
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking W D i ki Water Who is Houston’s Drinking Water Team - Houston s cont? Emergency Preparedness –“Tiered” Response : Tiered Tier 1: O&M continuity of critical functions 1: Tier 2: Back up team and Tier 1 relief 2: Tier 3: Incident response and follow up 3: Staged equipment and personnel for rapid recovery Balances response duties across organization and uses resources effectively
    • Why a Boil Water Notice? 30 TAC 290.46(q) Special Precautions – in the event of low (<than 20 psi) distribution pressure, th there is th i the potential for contamination from back flow into system
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking W D i ki Water Why a Boil Water Notice - cont? Before Hurricane Ike – Prior to Hurricane Ike, there were about 23 BWNs in SE Texas over the past 5 years, 5 from other hurricanes Most common cause is due to pressure loss from main breaks and construction No detection of any illness causing organisms, all precautionary Issuing BWNs erodes public confidence and can be devastating for a public utility g p y
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking W D i ki Water Why a Boil Water Notice - cont? y After Hurricane Ike – Record level (over 60) 60) widespread BWNs. Houston Galveston Clear Lake City La Porte a o te Pasadena League City Friendswood Webster Pearland Tens of smaller MUDs and CWS
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking Water Why a Boil Water Notice -cont? What led Houston to issue a notice? • Not what you’d think – total, simultaneous power loss to all 3 raw water pump stations – created a sudden and dramatic loss of capacity (unheard of in history) • Brought up 75 ground water pump stations on generators • Incomplete coverage of service area for ground water • Generator capacities not sufficient to maintain system pressures under high demand Result was pressures dangerously close to 20 psi in outlying areas p yg
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking Water Why a Boil Water Notice -cont? Was there really a public health threat? • No The BWN was totally precautionary No. What actually happened to get us back to normal? • 30 TAC 290.46(q)(2) requires a BWN to remain in effect until: Pressures recover to > 20 psi Chloramine residual restored to >0.5 Bacteriological samples are collected and negative g p g
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking Water Rising to Meet the Challenge Immediately following storm, developed and implemented a water quality response plan • Monitored pressure and chlorine residuals at numerous locations - confirmed above regulatory limits • Collected and lab tested 65 representative samples 3 samples initially tested coliform positive, but Repeat samples proved negative • No fecal coliforms detected, no low chlorine residuals found , Result - Boil Water Notice lifted within 5 days
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking Water Getting Back to Normal Lessons Learned • What worked – Communication communication Communication, communication, communication w/ customers, TCEQ and city administration • All employees received NIMS training, Tier 1s advanced training Helped in communicating concisely, precisely and across concisely organizational lines • Advance preparation – Going through the “What- “What- If’s” ahead of time
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking Water Getting Back to Normal Lessons Learned • What worked – cont cont. Technical ability and knowledge of the system – When thinking ‘outside the box’ is needed, nothing helps more than knowledge and experience th k ld d i • What didn’t work? Power, dual power – over reliance on energy utilities , p gy Emergency back up power – more needed at supply wells as well as distribution pumps Emergency generators - not intended for long term use – City- City-wide re-fueling created major logistical problems re-
    • Hurricane Ike and Houston Drinking Water Moving On Continue Emergency Readiness Training Continual Review of System Reliability y y Harden Known Weaknesses Harden Communication Protocols, Procedures and Response Pl R Plans Internal Employee Training and Preparedness to Deal with Continuance of Service Issues Continue to Educate the Public to Restore Confidence
    • Questions? Dannelle H. Belhateche, P.E. Dannelle.belhateche@cityofhouston.net Dannelle belhateche@cityofhouston net 713-837- 713-837-0847