Wel Toward An Equitable Future V4

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The 1st International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit (WEL) was held on 4-5 June 2009 in Istanbul, which proved to be one of the most comprehensive summits held in Turkey. The Summit offered new visions and fresh opinions on women’s entrepreneurship and leadership.

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Wel Toward An Equitable Future V4

  1. 1. 1st International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership (WEL) Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Table of Contents WEL Session 8: Seven Pathways for NGO Entrepreneurial and Leadership Success Toward an Equitable Future Abstract - Seven Pathways for NGO Entrepreneurial and Leadership …………………………………………………………….. 3 Professional Paper - Seven Pathways for NGO Entrepreneurial and Leadership Success Toward an Equitable Future …………….. 4 PowerPoint Presentation - Seven Pathways for NGO Entrepreneurial and Leadership …………………………………………………………… 13 Jalbert Web Resources …………………………………………………………… 18 Author Biography ……..…………………………………………………………... 25 st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 2
  2. 2. 1st International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit 4-5 June 2009 in Istanbul, Turkey WEL Session 8 – Women Empowerment through NGOs and Media Contribution by Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. Abstract: WEL Session 8: Seven Pathways for NGO Entrepreneurial and Leadership Success Toward an Equitable Future The horizon of universal opportunity is women’s economic engagement. Non- governmental organizations (NGOs) and women’s business associations (WBAs), worldwide, offer an equitable economic future for female enterprise owners. Engaged and active NGOs/WBAs can provide their business stakeholders an intellectual infrastructure consisting of a systematic growth methodology through communication, economic information, business skills training, partner search, social knowledge, peer-to-peer support and other enterprise needs. After 20+ years of global field experience with more than 30 international contractors on 83 assignments covering 40 countries, Dr. Jalbert synthesized her hands-on field experiences and global best practices into the national Small Business Development Centers initiative in Iraq. As Louis Berger’s senior advisor for the USAID-Tijara project, Jalbert focused on economic policy to tactically cultivate a strategy for institutional capacity building of Iraq’s nascent business development services industry. Jalbert traveled Iraq widely and frequently to understand community needs and obstacles. For Iraqi small business owners the number one challenge remains security followed by access to credit, understanding of modern business methodologies and market demand, technological connectivity, trained/skilled human resources, and regional trade linkages. Visit: www.sbdc-iraq.com for more details. Through Dr. Jalbert’s presentation in Session 8: Seven Pathways for NGO Entrepreneurial and Leadership Success, participants will traverse ideas, suggestions and global best practices directly applicable to NGOs, and particularly WBAs. Our horizon for women’s sustainable economic development will bear no fruit unless there is a conscious and determined emphasis on women’s economic empowerment. Bio: Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. is one of the world’s leading economic activists. Her mission is equitable business development strategy and policy through institutional capacity building. Jalbert is recognized as architect and champion of the Iraqi Small Business Development Centers program. st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 3
  3. 3. 1st International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit 4-5 June 2009 in Istanbul, Turkey Session 8 – Women Empowerment through NGOs and Media Seven Pathways for NGO Entrepreneurial and Leadership Success Toward an Equitable Future The horizon of universal opportunity for an equitable future is women’s economic engagement. As societal change agents non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and women’s business associations (WBAs), worldwide, inculcate an equitable economic future for female enterprise owners. Engaged and active NGOs/WBAs can provide business owners an intellectual infrastructure for systematic growth through communication, economic information, business skills training, local and regional markets, partner search, social knowledge, peer-to-peer support and other member enterprise needs. Opportunity, obstacle, success or failure symbolizes veils of ambiguity. While I wear three invisible cloaks of entrepreneur, advocate and institution builder, these st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 4
  4. 4. imperceptible shrouds are superficial and construed by the beholder as dissimilar realities. Maya, the Greco-Roman goddess of illusion, portrayed by artist Barbara Cate below, does not dispel the notion of transparency. Rather she embraces it to her advantage. Although wrapped in a see-through veil, creative and complex Maya is not a negative force. Maya is seen and understood through her diaphanous gauze and is defined by individual, unique characteristics forming her decisive reality of existence. st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 5
  5. 5. Of opportunities and obstacles, some are real and some are perceived. Of successes and failures, some are defined by one’s self and some are defined by society. It is our particularized character that constructs our life’s actual outcome thereby lifting the illusionary veil to reveal reality. Improved societal environs and the elimination of calcified discriminatory beliefs is what we, as NGO/WBA leaders and entrepreneurs, most desire. Social consciousness emerges slowly when governments are in transition or conflict. Governmental bullying is often mistaken for rule of law. Equal rights access, and the dignity it brings to an individual, is habitually hidden behind entrenched patriarchal infrastructure. Yet, gender parity is essential to inclusive economic engagement if we are to redirect our beloved societies into more peaceful, sustainable, socially nurturing worlds. The high-stakes risk that NGOs/WBAs must rise above is to challenge patriarchal sameness. Entrepreneurial endeavors are an ideal route to break built-in societal monotony. “The reason for the American risk-taking mentality may be historical,” reports Roger Martin, dean of the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, Canada. People originally coming to the USA were disillusioned with their living conditions. Martin noted that the USA, “started with a bunch of pigheaded, delusional people…” Maybe this statement is descriptive of NGOs, WBAs and businesswomen these days. We are delusional resulting from extreme economic unempowerment and historical disenfranchisement leaving about 50 percent of the world’s women marginalized. From my perspective, a period of disillusionment and delusion can be a good thing . . . because st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 6
  6. 6. that’s when change is cultivated. When one is looking for a new approach, a new idea, or a new business, it is typically borne out of frustration with the status quo. Through my international work I have met hundreds of men and women who are shaking up their current political and economic conditions through vigorous participation and active advocacy in their business associations. An individual’s natural spirit of entrepreneurship is a powerful key to economic development and transformation of status quo. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) provide the bulk of employment for most economies, advanced or not. Strong NGOs and WBAs advocate, support, and amplify necessary reforms; legislative restructuring that is part of the current international wave towards aggressively acquiring and/or accessing markets. Reforms must be grounded in the belief that promoting private businesses is key to national economic growth. Thus, holding up half of the sky as the Chinese say, as individual entrepreneurs, women must be bolstered! Today there’s no reason to ask the question whether NGOs and/or WBAs are help or hindrance to a woman entrepreneur. We have ample examples and research on every continent demonstrating the value that women business owners contribute to their families and communities. Whether women should or should not join a male-dominated organization such as a trade association or a chamber of commerce has long been a point of controversy. In the 90s, Billie Lee, an international writer on workplace issues, wrote persuasively in the San Diego, California Business Journal that women should join only mainstream chambers or business groups. Lee purported that only in male-dominated st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 7
  7. 7. organization would one be most likely to meet those who can demonstrate and coach powerful business techniques. Lee asked, “Why splinter off and declare that you are women first and business people second?” Lee ignored a fundamental point. In every society, women’s access to mainstream organizations and influential leaders is extremely limited. From war-ridden Iraq to the Maoist turmoil in Nepal as well as under-developed economies like Syria, Malawi and Nicaragua, creating and growing women’s NGOs and WBAs is a declaration of freedom, a manifest of economic equity and a pragmatic course of action to help women break through tough economic, political, cultural, and social barriers. Rita Thapa, widely recognized for her groundbreaking work in founding Tewa, is a Nepali feminist activist and founder of numerous women’s organizations. She is currently involved with Nagarik Aawaz (Citizens Voice), an initiative for conflict transformation and peace building and Dhaka Weaves. Rita admonished me to advise women of, “two things I cannot over emphasize enough in my own experience are: 1) learn to organize (one selves and what we do), and 2) influence and network with powerful men (instead of them just using us and ghettoizing us into "women's committees" - as in the Federation of Nepalese Chamber of Commerce and Industry). Thapa’s words are a powerful reminder to prepare and support promising entrepreneurs and leaders. Bea Celler, President of Konnect World, LLC, noted that another way to gain visibility and leadership opportunities for women SME owners is to st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 8
  8. 8. design an outreach program in global male-dominated BAs and Chambers of Commerce by giving these organizations insights on how attract more women business members. We were lucky that during the WEL Summit that, Birgit Arens, Coordinator of the Eurochambers Women Network, demonstrated the possibility for full inclusion of women in the European Community’s economic environment. To achieve this goal with over 1200 member chambers in 45 countries, Eurochambers is committed to a “more women-friendly business environment” with their Women on Board of Local Development program. Women’s business associations breathe dynamism into female-owned SMEs and are well positioned as community changemakers and stakeholders. Direct and immediate actions to be embraced are: • Lead. Authenticate your leadership role with superior organization for yourself and your work. Listen and act upon entrepreneur’s demands. Offer a wide range of revenue- generating services to support business growth. Remember, reliance on grants is a short-term revenue tactic, but delivery of reasonably priced services (training, resources, information, conducting surveys, conferences, roundtables, accounting, legal, registration, partner search, internet café, day care, etc.) builds sustainability for the NGOs/WBAs and for an entrepreneur’s business. • Publicize. Develop a media campaign that includes all forms of public relations through television, radio, newspapers, and magazines. Report facts on woman-owned businesses in your region. Describe how women’s businesses contribute to overall economic development of the country. st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 9
  9. 9. • Advocate. Campaign to develop market-enhancing policies supporting legal, tax, accounting, banking, and legislative corrective measures that encourage business development. Simplify over-regulation of the numerous forms, officials, and agencies that business owners worldwide severely criticize. Promote clear, decisive programs for economic improvement. Advocate for appropriate reforms; regulations should be continually upgraded, changed, developed, and implemented to reflect current trade and industry conditions. • Disseminate. Create effective, informational, low-cost outreach mechanisms like an e- newsletters, flyers, weekly updated websites, membership brochures, blogs, etc. • Link. Reach out to microfinance institutions and banks to link them with qualified entrepreneurs, but also look for ways to upgrade the staff skills of these institutions so that you grow together. • Implement. Apply the seven pathways for entrepreneurial and leadership success which are outlined below. Escalating trends of women entering business and of women joining business associations are on the rise across the globe. Women’s business associations can illustrate with explicit examples and recorded statistics a true picture of what women are contributing economically to their marketplace. Women-owned businesses can hold the mighty power of economic development in their hands. After all, small and mid-sized st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 10
  10. 10. businesses, and the vigorous associations supporting SMEs, are the heartbeat of a strong community. After 20+ years of global field experience with more than 30 international contractors on 83 assignments covering 40 countries, my hands-on field experiences and global best practices are synthesized into the national Small Business Development Centers initiative in Iraq. As Louis Berger’s senior advisor for the USAID-Tijara project, my single-minded objective concentrated on economic policy to tactically cultivate a strategy for institutional capacity building of Iraq’s nascent business development services industry. By traveling Iraq widely and frequently, I witnessed business community needs and obstacles. For Iraqi small business owners the number one challenge remains security followed by access to credit, understanding of modern business methodologies and market demand, technological connectivity, trained/skilled human resources, and regional trade linkages. Visit: www.sbdc-iraq.com for more details on this groundbreaking national program. If the SBDC program can work in Iraq’s conflict-ridden, economically-declined environment, it can work anywhere. Through my presentation at the Istanbul Summit in Session 8, entitled: Seven Pathways for NGO Entrepreneurial and Leadership Success, participants traversed ideas, suggestions and global best practices directly applicable to NGOs, and particularly to WBAs. Seven steps are key foundations to effectively empower women’s economic strength by: 1. Establishing a small business development center cornerstone program st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 11
  11. 11. 2. Motivating the women’s business community with sustainable and reasonable fee-based services 3. Promoting fee-based programs and economic analysis 4. Opening access to association membership and services to all women business owners 5. Walking briskly to your nearest Women’s Business Association (WBA) to join, actively participate, contribute time, resources, and energy. 6. Engaging media to ensure women have an economic voice 7. Respecting your members’ needs by identifying and offering a. High quality fee-based services b. Local and regional partner search c. Role models and mentors Ensuing the groundwork to EMPOWER women economically demonstrates that lives are changed, quality of life is improved, and equitable social consciousness is raised. These seven pathways will fortify women entrepreneurs. NGOs, WBAs, and in fact, governments must lead with a direct policy shift to focus and support women’s economic engagement. U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues Melanne S. Verveer st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 12
  12. 12. said in her Congressional testimony, “Clearly, investing in women is not just the right thing to do, it is the smart thing.” NGOs and WBAs inherently understand social and economic connections. Pioneering transformational leaders should be applauded for their persistent support to women’s business associations. Our hopeful horizon for women’s sustainable development and evolution of an equitable future will bear no fruit unless there is a conscious and determined emphasis on women’s economic empowerment. st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 13
  13. 13. st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 14
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  18. 18. RESOURCES/SUGGESTED INTERNET SITES FOR ASSOCIATIONS AND SMALL BUSINESS Developed by Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D., for USAID-TIJARA Revised January 2009 Resource Contents: Associations, NGOs and Advocates Business Planning Issues and Best Practices Consulting Craft Marketing Credit and/or Other Funding Employee Performance and Reviews Governmental Programs Multi-Lateral Organizations and Foundations Peace Processes Political Activism Research about Women Entrepreneurs Women in Development Women Entrepreneurships Blogs Associations Alliance of American and Russian Women: www.wbls.ru American Association of University Women: www.aauw.org American Business Women’s Association: www.abwa.org Association Women and Politics: www.frauundpolitik.ch Association of Women Entrepreneurs of Karnatak, India (AWAKE): www.awake-india.org Business and Professional Women: www.bpwusa.org Business and Professional Women-Colorado Federation: www.BPW.org Business and Professional Women International: www.bpwintl.com Coalition for Women’s Economic Development and Global Equity: womensedge.org Institute for International Education (IIE): www.iie.org www.iwid.org/gender.html International Federation of University Women (IFUW): www.ifuw.org International Forum for Women: www.iwforum.org/ National Association of Women Business Owners: www.nawbo.org World Association of Women Entrepreneurs: www.fcem.org Women-21.gov: www.women-21.gov Women Entrepreneurs Inc.: www.we-inc.com st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 19
  19. 19. Business Planning Issues and Best Practices Business Climate, Legal and Institutional Reform (BizCLIR): http://bizclir.com Business Plan Archive: www.businessplanarchive.org Business Plan Center: www.businessplans.org/ Business Plans (sample plans): www.bplans.com Direct Marketing Concepts: www.websg.com/dmc EnterWeb: www.enterweb.org/women.htm Entrepreneur Magazine: www.entrepreneur.com EntreWorld: www.entreworld.org IBM & IFC Toolkit: www.smetoolkit.org/smetoolkit/en Marketing Plans, Programs and Small Business Management: www.websitemarketingplan.com Marketing Survival Kit: www.marketingsurvivalkit.com My Own Business: www.myownbusiness.org/ SBA Entrepreneurial Test: www.onlinewbc.gov/docs/starting/test.htm Small Biz Help: www.smallbizhelp.net Strategic Business Planning: www.bizplan.com/ Strategic Systems International: www.ssi-world.com/ Strategic Development: www.s-d-g.com/ Village Earth/Small Enterprises/Cooperatives: www.villageearth.org Credit and/or Other Funding Active Capital: http://www.activecapital.org/ Angel Capital Association: http://www.angelcapitalassociation.org/ Angel Capital Education Foundation: http://www.angelcapitaleducation.org/ Angel Capital Network: www.angelcapitalnetwork.com Business Finance: www.businessfinance.com Center for Venture Research: http://wsbe.unh.edu/cvr/ Center for Women and Enterprise: www.cweboston.org Commercial Finance Online: www.CFOL.com Count-Me-In: www.count-me-in.org Dun & Bradstreet: www.dnb.com Foundation Directory Online Professional: http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/15017894/promo.htm Guidebook for Building an Angel Capital Network: http://www.kauffman.org/pdf/angel_guidebook.pdf Hudson Institute's Center for Global Prosperity: http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/news/story.jhtml?id=250800014 st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 20
  20. 20. Post Idea.com: www.postidea.com Springboard Enterprises: www.springboardenterprises.org Start-up Junkies: http://www.startupjunkies.org/angel.html Texas Women Ventures Fund: http://www.texaswomenventures.com/ Trapezia Fund: http://www.trapeziacapital.co.uk/homepage Virtual Library on Microcredit: www.gdrc.org/icm/ Women’s World Bank: www.womensworldbanking.org Consulting 4D Consulting Center: www.4d.com/startconsulting/ Consultant Journal: www.consultantjournal.com Entrepreneur.Com: www.entrepreneur.com Guerrilla Consulting: www.guerrillaconsulting.com/newsletter/index.html Independent Computer Consultants Association: www.icca.org Independent Consulting Bootcamp: www.independent-consulting- bootcamp.com/starting-a-consulting-business.html Management Consulting News: www.managementconsultingnews.com/interviews/kotler_interview.php My Small Biz: www.mysmallbiz.com/consulting-business/how-to-start-a- consulting-business.php Women in Consulting: www.womeninconsulting.org Craft Marketing Aid to Artisans: www.aidtoartisans.org/ Catalog Generator: www.catgen.com Crafts Center: www.craftscenter.org/ Novica: www.novica.com/ PeopleLink: www.peoplink.org Trading Crafts: www.tradingcrafts.com/ Ten Thousand Villages: www.tenthousandvillages.com/home.php Employee Performance and Reviews: Employee Assistance Program: http://www.hr.wayne.edu/avp/eap/ Employee Benefits: http://web2.sunyit.edu/human_resources/employeebenefits.inc Employee Evaluations: http://www.grapevinesurveys.com Employee Evaluations: st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 21
  21. 21. http://www.tgci.com/magazine/Employee%20Evaluation.pdf Employer Services Business Solutions: http://www.adp.com/ Employee Performance Evaluations: http://www.allbusiness.com/human- resources/workforce-management/434-1.html Human Resources and Employee Relations: http://www.yorku.ca/hr/ Human Resources: http://www.du.edu/hr/forms/employee_handbook.html How to Give an Effective Employee Evaluation: http://www.ehow.com/how_1914_give-effective-employee.html Measuring Service: www.retailbiz.com/ Team Building: http://wilderdom.com/games/InitiativeGames.html Governmental Programs (Ideas for SME policy models) Colorado Farm Bureau: www.colofb.com/ Colorado Tourism Office: www.state.co.us/gov_dir/oed/tourism/cto.html Colorado Government Resources, including: Colorado Business Resource Guide (or How to Start a Business in Colorado) and Colorado Office on Economic Development and International Trade www.state.co.us/gov_dir/oed/wbo/gresources.html www.state.co.us/gov_dir/oed.html www.state.co.us/oed/guide/ National Women’s Business Center: www.nwbc.gov Note: Sites for Iraq business, in English & Arabic: www.buyusa.gov/iraq Comprehensive Iraq Investment and Reconstruction site: www.export.gov/iraq Women’s Business Office in Colorado: www.state.co.us/gov_dir/oed/wbo.html U.S. Small Business Administration: www.onlinewbc.org U.S. Small Business Administration (for women): www.sba.gov/women and sba.gov/training/courses.html st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 22
  22. 22. Multi-Lateral Organizational Support and/or Donor Agency Aid and Foundations British-Know-How Fund: www.britishembassy.gov.uk Canadian Development Agency: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/ Foundations Listing: fdncenter.org Global Fund for Women: www.globalfundforwomen.org International Finance Corp.: www.ifc.org/GEM Mama Cash: www.mamacash.org Swedish Development Agency: www.sida.org/ TACIS: europa.eu.int/comm/external_relations/index.htm Tewa: www.tewa.org.np/ UN/NGO Link: www.un.org United Nations UN Homepage: www.unsystem.org USAID: www.usaid.gov Women for Women: www.womenforwomen.org Peace Processes Peace Women: www.peacewomen.org/ United States Institute for Peace: www.usip.org Women Waging Peace: www.womenwagingpeace.net/ Political Activism League of Women Voters: www.lwv.org/ Winrock International (trafficking): www.winrock.org Women's Action for New Directions: www.wand.org/ Women's EDGE: www.womensedge.org Women Impacting Public Policy: www.wipp.org Research about Women Entrepreneurs Catalyst: www.catalyst.org Center for Arab Women Training and Research (CAWTAR): www.cawtar.org Center for Women's Business Research: www.womenbusinessresearch.org EUROPA - Gateway to the European Union: europa.eu.int/index_en.htm Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM): www.gemconsortium.org Library links for entrepreneurs: www.gdsourcing.com/gds6.htm Quantum Leaps, Inc.: www.quantumleapsinc.org Women, Inc.: www.womenink.org Womenable: www.womenable.com Women's EDGE: www.womensedge.org st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 23
  23. 23. Women's Environment and Development Organization (WEDO): www.wedo.org Women's International Center: Women's Resources on the Net: www.wic.org/misc/resource.htm Yale University: www.cs.yale.edu/~tap/tap.html Women in Development Association for Women in Development: www.awid.org cfd - The NGO for Women's Empowerment: www.cfd-ch.org New Perspectives for Women: www.winrock.org.md/index.php?l=en Women Empowerment Organization: www.sbdc-iraq.com Women’s Business Center: www.onlinewbc.org Women, Ink: www.womenink.org UN Division for the Advancement of Women: www.un.org/womenwatch/daw UNIFEM-UN: www.unifem-eseasia.org/resources/resources.htm www.sida.se/sida/jsp/sida.jsp?d=121&language=en_US Women Entrepreneurships Blogs Global Entrepreneurship Monitor: http://www.gemconsortium.org/ International Women’s Day: http://www.internationalwomensday.com/ National Women’s History Project: http://www.nwhp.org/ The Future of Small Business: http://www.intuit.com/futureofsmallbusiness/ Trends in Women's Entrepreneurship Support: http://www.prowess.org.uk/documents/GEMProwessReportFinal_000.pdf Women’s Enterprise Task Force: http://www.womensenterprise.co.uk/ Shopping to Support Women Entrepreneurs As a service from Womenable here is a list of a few sources of fair trade items, much of which will directly benefit women-owned micro businesses in the developing world. • Catalog, bricks-and-mortar merchants: You may have already received one (or more) catalogs from Heifer International, where you can "buy" a farm animal to donate to a subsistence farmer in the developing world, but have you heard of these fair trade catalog merchants: Fair Indigo, A Greater Gift, and League of Artisans? If you'd rather see and touch before you buy, many cities in the U.S. and Canada have a Ten Thousand Villages retail store, which offers hand-made items from around the world. • Web-based, clicks-and-mortar e-tailers: The web is home to a number of fair trade e- tailers, among them: Global Exchange, Mercado Global, Trade as One, Two Hands Worldshop, and World of Good. A relatively new entry comes from NAWBO member Mary Schnack, with her Up from the Dust e-tail effort. st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 24
  24. 24. • Beyond clothing and jewelry: Some of us womenablers are not fashionistas, preferring perhaps more sporty pursuits. Well, Fair Trade Sports or Racadillo may be the place for you. And, if you are a java junkie, check out Grounds for Change or Higher Grounds Trading. Whatever your interest or shopping need, think 'fair trade' - not only for gifts and holidays but whenever you shop. To learn more about fair trade and other planet-friendly consumerism, check out Good Intentions, an e-zine. This resource is not intended to be comprehensive list of Internet sites, but rather illustrative. There is no end in sight! Enjoy the research process. st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 25
  25. 25. Biography: Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. is one of the world’s leading economic activists. Her mission is equitable business development strategy and policy through institutional capacity building of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and women’s business associations (WBAs); she has assisted more than 30 international contractors on 83 assignments in 40 countries. Jalbert is recognized as architect and champion of the Iraqi Small Business Development Centers program, and has influenced NGO and WBA capacity building worldwide. As an economic activist and an international development professional (www.jalbertconsulting.com), Dr. Jalbert contributes to USAID-sponsored private sector development projects. Her work is focused on business development strategy and policy with the over-arching goal of investing resources equitably in both social and business change. Recently over 100 business associations united through the Iraqi Business Council to present Dr. Jalbert an award to recognize her championship and contribution to the national network of Iraq’s Small Business Development Centers. To promote both social responsibility and to encourage women’s economic engagement, Dr. Jalbert publishes notably about the impact of: business associations, women entrepreneurs, [STOP] trafficking of women and children campaigns, and constructive economic interventions for entrepreneurial expansion. “Peace is not only absence of violence, but is also a just rule of law and economic well-being.” Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. End st 1 International Women Entrepreneurship and Leadership Summit June 2009 - Istanbul, Turkey Susanne E. Jalbert, Ph.D. 26

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