Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Music Research and Performance Project/WebQuest
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Music Research and Performance Project/WebQuest

2,453
views

Published on

EDUCC331 WebQuest project which encourages students to research about the composer and history behind their musical work.

EDUCC331 WebQuest project which encourages students to research about the composer and history behind their musical work.


1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • It is very encouraging that so many have viewed this file and some have even downloaded it! Please, feel free to leave your thoughts and feedback, I would like to have your ideas on what works, and what I could do to revamp and improve this WebQuest.

    Thanks!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,453
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
62
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Dead Composers Are Dead: Why are we still listening? Student Page Title Introduction Task Part I Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for High School Musicians Designed by S.D. Jensen [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Task Part II Task Part III Task Part IV Grave of Igor Stravinsky
  • 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Many composers have come and gone over the years, each leaving their legacy in music. Some composers are revered and loved while others are forgotten or discarded. What is it about some music that gives it a continued life while others are forgotten? Is there something magical about the music that, although written decades or centuries ago, that is timeless? Are there social dynamics at work which resurrect the old and teach the new? Continue
  • 3. Introduction Part II Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Your mission is to choose a solo or chamber work for your instrument or vocal range. After you have selected your piece you will complete the following:
    • Create a Timeline of your composer’s life (using Excel)
    • Create a Flyer using Publisher giving a brief description of your composer.
    • Using PowerPoint, create a slideshow to aid you in a 3-5 minute presentation about your composer and work.
    • Perform your selection in class.
  • 4. The Task Part I: Timeline Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Research your composer and create a timeline of their life. Include:
      • Important Dates: Birth, Death, Marriage(s), Moving to a new location,
      • Important Works,
      • Style Periods,
      • Important Historical Events that may have affected the composer,
      • Where your work fits into the timeline.
    • Use Excel to create your timeline. How it is to look and how you organize it are completely up to you!
    • Don’t forget to use your timeline to help you with Part II and Part III
    Title Part II
  • 5. The Task Part II: Flyer Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Create a flyer about your composer which includes:
      • A Picture,
      • Important Events of your Composer’s Life,
      • Your Composer’s Style and Period,
      • Your Composer’s Important Contributions to music,
      • Important Works by Your Composer,
      • Other Information you find to be interesting, useful, or defining for your composer’s life and music.
    • Use Publisher to create and edit your flyer.
    • Remember: These flyers will be copied for all of your peers to use for future reference.
    Title Part III
  • 6. The Task Part III: PowerPoint Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Create a slide presentation which will serve as a visual aid during your 3-5 minute presentation. Some things your may want to include in your slides:
      • A Picture of your Composer,
      • Other Helpful Pictures,
        • People and places important to your composer
      • Important Information,
      • Manuscripts,
      • Other images or facts you feel will tell why your composer is still remembered today.
    • Use PowerPoint to complete your slideshow. Your slide show will be projected during your presentation.
    Title Part IV
  • 7. The Task Part IV: Presentation and Performance Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Prepare and present biographical information about your composer including:
      • Important Facts and Dates,
      • Information about your selected Piece
      • Why Your Composer is still considered Important Today!
    • Your biographical presentation should be 3-5 minutes. Remember to rehearse your information before and be prepared for your presentation.
    • After you present your composer you (and your group) will perform your selected work.
    Title
  • 8. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Select a work from the provided list. You may form your own chamber group or play a solo. If you perform a solo it is recommended you have an accompanist (if required by the work) perform with you. Come see me if you need help finding someone to accompany you.
    • Research your composer. If you have chosen a chamber piece, your group will research and present together. You will be expected to go longer than 5 minutes, depending on the size of your chamber ensemble. For example, a quartet will be expected to present 12-15 minutes about their composer.
    • Create your timeline using Excel. This portion will be due two weeks before you present. Print and email your timeline. Your timeline will be displayed in the classroom throughout the year.
    • Create your flyer. The flyer portion will be due one week prior to your presentation in order for copies to be made and passed out after your performance.
    • Put together your slide presentation. Be sure that all of your information is up to date and relevant to the composer, the work or your own performance.
    • Remember: any pictures or media you choose to use should be creative commons or in compliance with copyright law.
  • 9. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Oral Presentation Rubric : PowerPoint Presentation           Teacher Name: S.D. Jensen Student Name:     ________________________________________ CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Preparedness Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals. The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. Student does not seem at all prepared to present. Content Shows a full understanding of the topic. Shows a good understanding of the topic. Shows a good understanding of parts of the topic. Does not seem to understand the topic very well. Time-Limit Presentation is within time limit (3-5 minutes) and complete. Presentation is too long or too short, but with good information. Presentation is too long or too short and lacks information. Presentation is too long or too short and is not complete/lacks enough effort and information. Speaks Clearly Speaks clearly and distinctly all (100-95%) the time, and mispronounces no words. Speaks clearly and distinctly all (100-95%) the time, but mispronounces one word. Speaks clearly and distinctly most ( 94-85%) of the time. Mispronounces no more than one word. Often mumbles or can not be understood OR mispronounces more than one word.
  • 10. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] There are many reasons why different composers remain popular while others are forgotten. It is important that as musicians, we understand these reasons beyond ‘it sounds nice’. By understanding where the music comes from, why it is important and why it was written a musician can give life to music, going beyond what can be oversimplified to notes on a page.
  • 11. References & Credits Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Here are some Web Sites you may find helpful: General Biographies: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/education_bios.html http://www.naxos.com/composerlist/A.htm Library of Congress http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html Mozart http://www.mozartproject.org/biography/index.html Vivaldi http://www.baroquemusic.org/bqxvivaldi.html Paul Creston http://www.schirmer.com/default.aspx?TabId=2419&State_2872=2&ComposerId_2872=301 Bernstein http://www.leonardbernstein.com/about.php David Maslanka http://www.davidmaslanka.com/ George and Ira Gershwin http://www.gershwin.com/ Images Taken From Flickr: Jeff Kubina, akbar1947(campingagain), etohaholic, MrTinDCsphotostream, pittigliani2005, joebrent. The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group
  • 12. Dead Composers Are Dead: Why are we still listening? [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for High School Musicians Designed by S.D. Jensen [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Grave of Igor Stravinsky
  • 13. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Many times, high school music programs focus on the what and the how. It is often forgotten to include the Why. Students often fail to think about why we still perform the same music year after year, century after century. Many of the music today was written using the innovations of previous composers and credit is not always given where it applies in the score notes, score notes that many students never read anyways. The focus of this WebQuest is to put music with research about a composer. The music should be of some significance, as should the composer. Many of the popular solos today are editions of works by composers such as Mozart or J.S. Bach. The goal is for students to piece together the history of the music and the events that surrounded its composition. For example, Gustav Holst wrote The Planets Suite as a reaction to World War I. Does Mars mean the same thing to listeners when they imagine a Nazi attack? The history of music makes music come to life and many times gives deeper meaning to the notes, sounds and musical emotions. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 14. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This project was created with High School age Musicians in mind. At this level many musically inclined students are able to perform works by major composers and are at a point where they will have few opportunities to perform outside of major ensembles. This project not only delves into the finer history of music, but also into the importance of musical performance. Students will need to be at an acceptable level of proficiency for this project in terms of their technique. Younger or less experience performers should be encouraged to work with a group, while the more advanced students should be encouraged to perform a solo. Teachers may help guide their students to music which will challenge, but not overwhelm students. In order for this project to be successful for the students, they will have to practice regularly as well as be thorough in their research. Ideally this project should be stretched over a number of months, or even a full semester or term. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 15. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Musical Standards Addressed:   1. Students sing or play on instruments a varied repertoire of music, alone or with others – The central focus of the assignment is the final performance of their selected work.   4. Students will listen to, analyze, evaluate, and describe music – Students will be asked to describe their piece before they perform the work as well as give any historical significance and the reason why the work is still performed today   5. Students will relate music to various historical and cultural traditions – By researching the lives of the composers and the reasons surrounding the work, students will understand the dynamics that exist between society and music. Students will also be challenged to work with a group or with an accompanist. All students will have the opportunity to speak and perform for an attentive audience in a safe and academic setting. In order to create this atmosphere, proper concert etiquette should be addressed before presentations begin. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 16. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Teachers will need to compile a list of repertoire including music by researchable composers, covering a variety of instruments. New instruments, such as the saxophone family, or less common instruments will be more difficult to find music for, though there are a variety of transcriptions and adaptations available.
    • The students can either do some work in class or outside of class. Some checkpoints should be set in place if the project is stretched over longer periods of time to make sure students are working. For example, time could be set aside to meet with each performer sometime before they perform to hear their progress and give them helpful advice. If it is possible, bring in an expert of an instrument and have them interact with the performers.
    • If students want to work with a smaller ensemble, they should understand that they cannot pick random instruments. String quartets and chamber wind groups have been set up in traditional settings for centuries, making it difficult to find older music for patchwork groups.
    • Students may be apprehensive to the idea of performing in front of a group alone. This should be encouraged as much as possible. Small groups and soloist settings allow for students to grow as individual musicians in ways that large ensembles cannot.
    • The most difficult portion of this assignment will be the preparation of music choices. A teacher may predetermine the groups and music that each student will participate in and perform. Stronger students should be encouraged to allow less experienced students to play with the chamber groups. Students should not be discouraged from participating in more than one group, if at all possible.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 17. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Students will need access to the programs required for this project: Excel, Publisher and PowerPoint. In order to enlarge the PowerPoint for presentation, a projector is required. The setup of the room should somehow allow the students to switch slides easily, without disrupting the flow of the presenter or presenters. Another extension of this project is to have a concert of the solo performances for the parents/guardians to come and see. Holding a contest to be able to perform may create incentive for students to perform even better. If your group is going to see a professional concert, have them research about the music and composers or even the history of the group you are going to see. Bring to life the history of the music for the students and create as many connections for them as is possible. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 18. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page There are many levels which can spell success for students. Some will benefit from the presentation and research while others will expand their technique through practicing the musical portion. The majority of the grade should be based on the completion of the projects, presentation and performances. A smaller portion of the grade should be based on student understanding of the subject matter and their improvement as a performing musician. The central focus should be on the overall project of putting together the various influences of music and history. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Oral Presentation Rubric : PowerPoint Presentation           Teacher Name: S.D. Jensen Student Name:     ________________________________________ CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Preparedness Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals. The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. Student does not seem at all prepared to present. Content Shows a full understanding of the topic. Shows a good understanding of the topic. Shows a good understanding of parts of the topic. Does not seem to understand the topic very well. Time-Limit Presentation is within time limit (3-5 minutes) and complete. Presentation is too long or too short, but with good information. Presentation is too long or too short and lacks information. Presentation is too long or too short and is not complete/lacks enough effort and information. Speaks Clearly Speaks clearly and distinctly all (100-95%) the time, and mispronounces no words. Speaks clearly and distinctly all (100-95%) the time, but mispronounces one word. Speaks clearly and distinctly most ( 94-85%) of the time. Mispronounces no more than one word. Often mumbles or can not be understood OR mispronounces more than one word.
  • 19. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Open the WebQuest.
    • Click slides to advance when the page has been read.
    • Have a student read each page aloud.
    • Answer any questions students have.
    • Read off groups if they are predetermined or have students select groups and works based off of your compiled list.
    • Ask for any concerns, questions or misunderstandings.
    • Instruct the students to begin working and address any questions they might have.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 20. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Many times in the high school music classroom, performance as a large ensemble or choir overtakes other subjects related to musical understanding. The social and historical value of music is often forgotten in favor of increasing musical ability. This project is focused on allowing students to research and realize the origins of music. By understanding where the sounds gained their inspiration and why the notes were written, students will better connect with the music and eventually be able to reflect that deeper understanding in their own personal performances. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 21. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Here are some Web Sites you may find helpful: General Biographies: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/education_bios.html http://www.naxos.com/composerlist/A.htm Library of Congress http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html Mozart http://www.mozartproject.org/biography/index.html Vivaldi http://www.baroquemusic.org/bqxvivaldi.html Paul Creston http://www.schirmer.com/default.aspx?TabId=2419&State_2872=2&ComposerId_2872=301 Bernstein http://www.leonardbernstein.com/about.php David Maslanka http://www.davidmaslanka.com/ George and Ira Gershwin http://www.gershwin.com/ Images Taken From Flickr: Jeff Kubina, akbar1947(campingagain), etohaholic, MrTinDCsphotostream, pittigliani2005, joebrent. The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion