RosExpert Career playbook
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RosExpert Career playbook

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  • 05/19/11 Ladies and Gentlemen, For me, the alliance between Korn/Ferry and IBB Management is in essence a confirmation of the old and ever-true adage: “The best joins with the best”. Founded in 2006, IBB Management is a pioneer in the Moroccan market with an impressive track-record of high-level placements across Northern Africa and the Middle East. With a specialized and very competent team of 10 consultants, IBB has successfully completed over 600 search assignments in various industries, thus earning itself a reputation for excellence. Korn/Ferry is the worldwide leader in executive search and the premier provider of integrated talent management solutions. From nearly 80 offices in 40 countries, Korn/Ferry assists organizations in attracting, developing, retaining and sustaining their people. What truly differentiates us from other firms is our integrated perspective along the HR life cycle and, as a result, our consulting capability in the areas of leadership development, team effectiveness, enterprise learning and organizational transformation [1] . Thanks to the alliance, IBB’s clients now have the added benefit of being able to tap into Korn/Ferry’s global network and its talent pool of 7 million placed board members and executives. IBB on the other hand provides the invaluable “local touch”, bringing in its expertise and cultural sensitivity when serving Korn/Ferry clients in the Moroccan market and in the region. Together, IBB and Korn/Ferry will serve local, regional and global clients with best-in-class talent management solutions, using the local culture and experience of IBB, combined with Korn/Ferry’s scientifically-based approach to talent, leadership and competencies. You may think “scientifically-based – how so?”. I would therefore like to expand on this. Research shows that knowledge, skills and experience account for only about 10% of the differences in business outcomes. Why then do most companies focus on pedigree (experience), the CV (skills) and the interview dialogue (knowledge) when recruiting new talent? At Korn/Ferry, we know that the competencies account for approximately 50% of performance. The rest relies on experience (20%), learning skills (learnt skills or learning agility?? Pls. clarify) (20%) and motivation (10%) . If competencies are so important, what exactly are they? [NEXT SLIDE]
  • It is important to note that competencies are observable and measurable , which is a key requirement for any kind of scientific analysis. MOVE TO NEXT SLIDE
  • To illustrate the dramatic effect of competencies with regard to performance , I would like to show you two profiles in comparison. [MOVE TO NEXT SLIDE]

RosExpert Career playbook RosExpert Career playbook Presentation Transcript

  • / Career Playbook Practical Tips for Professional Success May 201 1
  • The Best Joins With The Best Top talent employees with matching skills &competencies Best employer with T&D and succession planning in place Best with the best
  • Competencies are the observable and measurable characteristics of an individual – separate from knowledge, skills and experience – that contribute to his/her success in a given organisation
    • Personal: common to like roles and levels across all jobs – composure, patience, creativity
    • Managerial: common to all like level jobs managing resources – planning, priority setting
    • Leadership: common to all like level roles leading units – vision, innovation, strategy
    Types Of Competencies
  • / Defining what you want
      • Knowing your strengths, as well as what matters most to you at this stage of your career, will bring focus and clarity to every part of your job search.
      • In a competitive and turbulent job market, flexibility and creativity are essential to success.
      • A sophisticated understanding of your professional skills and personal attributes allows you to be more imaginative about how and where they can be applied.
  • / Defining what you want (continuation)
    • Step 1:
    • C areer audit.
    • For every job in your past, make a list of what you liked and disliked most about your role, colleagues, and the work environment.
    • What “non-negotiable” criteria are you looking for now? Write them down.
    • Creating a list of companies you respect also might help narrow the scope of your job search.
    • Step 2:
    • U nderstand your motivations behind your earlier choices and what inspires you now.
    • Step 3:
    • 5 “must-have” career criteria:
    • Responsibilities
    • Company culture
    • Work&life balance
    • Career prospects
    • Remuneration
  • / Finding your core strengths
    • Engage feedback. An easy way to find out is to use LinkedIn’s “Recommendations” feature to see how your groupmates and friends describe you.
    • Write out your “personal brand proposition” and a detailed description of your dream job. It is also essential to begin practicing a thirty-second to three-minute verbal “pitch” that encapsulates your personal brand.
  • / Marketing yourself
  • / Cover Letters
    • Cover letters: say what you want and why you deserve it. C over letter tailored to the specific position.
    • The introduction should address the hiring authority or appropriate recruiter by name. If someone has suggested you reach out to this person, say so.
    • I n one or two sentences, clearly state what you are looking for and why this organization or position matches your vision.
    • W rite one or two paragraphs (or a paragraph followed by a bulleted list of three major accomplishments) that summarize your background and skills as they directly relate to the organization or role. Alternatively, this section can be used to present an idea you have for the organization that you are especially well suited to deliver.
    • Close the cover letter by asking the reader for what you want to happen next ( be it an interview, information, advice, or more contacts ).
  • / Resume basics
    • The core components of any resume are:
    • Contact information
    • Executive summary
    • Experience
    • Key accomplishments
    • Education
    • Professional associations, awards, and publications: Include these details only if they reflect your standing in your field.
    • Languages.
    • There are plenty of resources about building great resumes, online and in print, that you can refer to for more guidance.
  • / Resume basics (continuation)
    • N ever miss an opportunity to practice selling yourself.
    • Communicate your strengths and the tangible, significant results you have achieved by including action verbs and phrases that apply to your function or industry. Avoid being repetitive or using too many stats, facts, and jargon.
    • Limit your resume to 1-2 pages, highlighting only the most outstanding examples of your capabilities and accomplishments.
    • Avoid including information about your hobbies and interests unless they clearly relate to a specific job opportunity, and save your objective statement for the cover letters you write for each new role you pursue.
    • N ever lie or pad your resume. Inflating responsibilities or falsifying degrees are two of the most common ways people exaggerate and, as resume fraud has become more prevalent, so has the degree to which recruiters vet and verify the information.
  • / Working with recruiters Working with recruiters can be a valuable part of your marketing campaign, but understanding how they work is essential to establishing relationships that ultimately lead to a new position.
  • / Getting the job within 8 seconds Interviewing. Before an interview, it is advisable to learn as much as possible about the hiring organization’s business, corporate DNA, and key issues. Based on what you find out, think about what the company is looking for outside the published job specification, how your skills fit.
    • When managed properly, interviews should include four distinct parts:
    • P roving that you have what it takes to handle a job, or develop it into an even bigger one, is a primary goal of your interview. G etting your questions answered .
    • Establishing rapport and trust with the interviewer .
    • Selling yourself while the interviewer sells the role and company culture .
    • Wrapping up, soliciting real-time feedback, and identifying next steps.
    • Interview to-do list:
    • Anticipate questions you might be asked.
    • R eview your reasons for interviewing: What do you want to convey? What do you want to learn?
    • P ractice talking about various experiences— both positive and negative—in less than three minutes.
    • Review your own work social history for specific situations that might apply to the new role, the action you took, and the results you delivered.
    • Once the interview is over, send personalized thank you letters .
  • / Interview Do’s and Don’ts
    • DON’T
    • Schedule an interview for a day when you have other pressing demands on your time, or at a time of day when you might struggle to remain energetic and present.
    • Talk only about your knowledge and technical skills without also describing your personal work and leadership style.
    • Give canned responses that keep the conversation at the surface level or that make unsubstantiated claims.
    • Emphasize issues like compensation and advancement too soon, such as in the first round of interviews.
    • Talk about other companies you are considering or offers that are on the table.
    • Be desperate, sarcastic, defensive, or critical of past employers.
    • DO
    • Allot ample time. While a schedule comprising multiple meetings is typical, occasionally the hiring manager or managers will unexpectedly invite you to meet other members of the team on the spot.
    • Establish and maintain an emotional connection with the interviewer by smiling, listening, endorsing, and contributing throughout the conversation.
    • Pay close attention to your word choice .
    • Be mindful of where you are in the overall selection process.
    • Show a genuine interest in the organization and opportunity.
    • Ask if there are any areas of concern and address them while you are still face-to-face with the interviewer.
  • / Reference selection Reference selection. Choosing and preparing the most appropriate people to speak about you, as a person and as a professional .
  • / Sealing the deal and Offer letter Sealing the deal. Typically, by the time the hiring organization and the candidate are convinced the fit is a good one, they both are emotionally committed to making things work. It is only at this point that the formal negotiations begin. T he offer letter , take a personal approach to accepting: call the recruiter and/or the hiring manager and thank them for the opportunity. Clarify next steps and inform them of when and how you will return a signed copy of the offer and confirm a start date.
  • W e believe that everyone benefits when the right match is made.