Climate Risk Management in               Chinas Agricultural Sector                                   Claire Hsu          ...
Climate Risk Management in Chinas          Agricultural SectorI. Chinas Agricultural Development and its Challenges      F...
Chinas Agricultural Development and its                               ChallengesFigure 1: Strengthening China’s food secur...
Chinas Agricultural Development and its              Challenges: Food Safety and SecurityGreater attention paid to supply ...
Chinas Agricultural Development and its Challenges: Tightening Resource ConstraintsRapid industrialization and urbanizatio...
Chinas Agricultural Development and its   Challenges: Extreme Weather EventsFigure 1: Agricultural areas under disasters i...
Chinas Agricultural Development and its Challenges: Growing Rural‐Urban InequalityThe rural‐urban income ratio has increas...
The Impact of Climate Change on Chinas Agriculture: Direct Impacts of Climate Change            on Chinese Agriculture Dir...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through                       Climate Risk Management           Building Agricultural Res...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through        Climate Risk Management  Developing an Agricultural Climate Risk Managemen...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through        Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate R...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through        Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate R...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through        Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate R...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through        Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate R...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through        Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate R...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through          Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate...
Building Agricultural Resilience Through        Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate R...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Claire Hsu — Climate risk management in china's agricultural sector

878 views
790 views

Published on

The Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) jointly hosted the International Conference on Climate Change and Food Security (ICCCFS) November 6-8, 2011 in Beijing, China. This conference provided a forum for leading international scientists and young researchers to present their latest research findings, exchange their research ideas, and share their experiences in the field of climate change and food security. The event included technical sessions, poster sessions, and social events. The conference results and recommendations were presented at the global climate talks in Durban, South Africa during an official side event on December 1.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
878
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Claire Hsu — Climate risk management in china's agricultural sector

  1. 1. Climate Risk Management in  Chinas Agricultural Sector Claire Hsu Intern, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)Presented at the International Conference on Climate Change and Food Security  Organized by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) and the  International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)  November 8, 2011 , Beijing, P.R. China
  2. 2. Climate Risk Management in Chinas  Agricultural SectorI. Chinas Agricultural Development and its Challenges Food Safety and Security Tightening Resource Constraints Extreme Weather Events Growing Rural‐Urban InequalityII. The Impact of Climate Change on Chinas Agriculture Direct Impacts of Climate Change on Chinese Agriculture Indirect Impacts of Climate Change on Chinese Agriculture Uncertainties of ForecastsIII. Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management Developing an Agricultural Climate Risk Management Framework Key Agricultural Climate Risk Management and Adaptation MeasuresIV. Summary and Policy Recommendations
  3. 3. Chinas Agricultural Development and its  ChallengesFigure 1: Strengthening China’s food security (in terms of proportion and number of people living below $1.25 a day) Figure 2: China’s agricultural production growth rates Source: Huang and Rozelle (2009)Source: Fan (2010)
  4. 4. Chinas Agricultural Development and its  Challenges: Food Safety and SecurityGreater attention paid to supply chain management in addition to enhancing productivityMany innovations have enabled high‐quality food production and better‐linked production to consumersDeploying food safety policies in concert with existing self‐sufficiency policy regime
  5. 5. Chinas Agricultural Development and its Challenges: Tightening Resource ConstraintsRapid industrialization and urbanization have spurred demand for land for industrial and residential use » The acreage of arable land decreased from 1.95 billion mu in 1996 to 1.826  billion mu by the end of 2007, a decrease of 123 million mu over ten years,  with a 12.3 million mu average annual decrease.  » The per capita acreage of arable land decreased from 1.59 mu to 1.39 mu  over the same period.In 2006, China’s per capita water resources were only 24% of the world level and agricultural access to these limited resources is increasingly threatened by: » Combined changes in temperature and precipitation » Industrialization and urbanization » Decreasing water table levels 
  6. 6. Chinas Agricultural Development and its  Challenges: Extreme Weather EventsFigure 1: Agricultural areas under disasters in China 1978‐2009 (in kilo hectares)Source: China National Bureau of Statistics (2010)
  7. 7. Chinas Agricultural Development and its Challenges: Growing Rural‐Urban InequalityThe rural‐urban income ratio has increased from 1.9 in 1985 to 3.4 in 2009. Chinas rural areas remain key in terms of population and employment. Permanent rural residents account for over half of the total population, while people employed in rural areas account for 2/3 of total employment.The food security concerns of poverty stricken populations are especially acute and as China’s rural poverty rate is 8.3 percent, many in these rural areas are most at risk of food insecurity.
  8. 8. The Impact of Climate Change on Chinas Agriculture: Direct Impacts of Climate Change  on Chinese Agriculture Direct Impacts of Climate Change on Chinese Agriculture » Climate Change Impacts on Crop Yields.  » Climate Change Impacts on Cropping Patterns.  » Climate Change Impacts on Livestock. Indirect Impacts of Climate Change on Chinese Agriculture » Impacts of Climate Change on Agricultural Production. » Impacts of Climate Change on Crop Prices and Trade.  » Food Security.  » Regional Implications.  Sources of Uncertainty » Climate Models and Scenarios.   » Uncertain CO2 Fertilization Effects.   » Other Sources of Uncertainty. 
  9. 9. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management Risk: "the combination of the probability of an event and its negative  consequences" (UNISDR 2009)Figure 2: Sources of hazard, exposure and vulnerability Sources: Rural Survey Department of the National Bureau of Statistics (2011) and Balzer and Hess (2010)Sources: Rural Survey Department of the National Bureau of Statistics (2011) and Balzer and Hess (2010)
  10. 10. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Developing an Agricultural Climate Risk Management Framework Source: Adapted from Jha et al. (2011)
  11. 11. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management:  Hazard Assessment Hazard analysis involves the estimation of the geographic impact of a  risk event in terms of its severity, and frequency,  and probability of  future occurrence.  Hazard assessment requires scientific understanding of relevant natural  phenomena, interpretation of historical records of the occurrence of  extreme events, and interaction with projected climate scenarios, and it  provides the basis for the identification of hazard zones, which can be  presented on maps at various scales. 
  12. 12. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management:  Hazard Assessment t Source: United Nations 2007
  13. 13. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management:  Exposure Assessment Exposure is defined as "the total value of elements at risk" and is  quantified using "the number of human lives and the value of the  properties or assets that can potentially be affected by hazards.” Exposure assessment is used to define the spatial distribution of the  asset(s)‐at‐risk and to categorize them according to the entailed  potential damage according to the relevant levels of hazards.  Comprehensive agricultural exposure analysis should include residential  (population and households) and infrastructural (roads and railways)  exposures in addition to agricultural (crop area and its production)  exposures
  14. 14. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management:  Vulnerability Assessment The vulnerability of a system refers to "the characteristics and  circumstances of a community, system or asset that make it susceptible  to the damaging effects of a hazard.” There are many dimensions of vulnerability, due to various physical,  social, economic, and environmental factors, such as improper design  and construction of buildings, insufficient protection of assets,  insufficient public information and awareness, limited official  recognition of risks and preparedness measures, and poor  environmental management. Vulnerability varies significantly within a community and over time and  the goal of vulnerability assessment is to quantify the vulnerability of  assets subjected to hazards
  15. 15. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management:  Estimate the Damages and Losses The probability estimation for specific loss scenarios involves the consideration  of established probabilities of natural event occurrence and expected structural  performance. Damage to the crop sub‐sector consists of damage to soil, irrigation  infrastructure (mainly in the public sector), irrigation network, and agriculture  buildings and machinery. Crop loss consists of the potential production loss from  seasonal crops (one season) as well as from perennial fruit (over the multi‐year  period required to initially bear fruit) and is estimated using farm gate prices. Damage to the livestock sub‐sector consists of animal deaths that are due to  climate hazards. Loss refers to the potential production loss from animals over  the multi‐year period required for young animals to start producing milk or meat. 
  16. 16. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management: Find  the Best Adaptation OptionsFigure 5: Climate risk typologies and adaptation strategies (risk layer one: purple;  risk layer two: orange; and risk layer three: red)Sources: Adapted from Ramasamy (2011), Goodland (n.d.), and Luxbacher and Goodland (n.d.)
  17. 17. Building Agricultural Resilience Through  Climate Risk Management Building Agricultural Resilience Through Climate Risk Management:  Implement the Adaptation Plan Action‐oriented coordination. Enhance awareness of adaptation. Improve inter‐departmental coordination of adaptation policy and action.  Coordinate planned adaptation and autonomous adaptation.  Mainstream adaptation and institutionalize adaptation funding. 

×