Comparing Cloud for Sales with older SaaS tools
 

Comparing Cloud for Sales with older SaaS tools

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While awareness of digitally driven markets and customers, and recognition of the need to make appropriate investments to take advantage of the situation, count as prerequisites for winning, another ...

While awareness of digitally driven markets and customers, and recognition of the need to make appropriate investments to take advantage of the situation, count as prerequisites for winning, another prerequisite is to use the right sales tools.

Over a decade ago, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solutions entered the market, and many sales teams jumped on the SaaS sales solution bandwagon. Unfortunately, some of those solutions were designed before social, mobile, and analytics became commonplace. Those older solutions have since been bypassed by newer solutions that natively improve sales effectiveness by putting the power of social, mobile, and analytics into the hands of sales practitioners.

What should sales teams look for in a SaaS sales solution right now? Check out this report and also visit http://www.sap.com/customer-engagement

or follow us on twitter @SAPCloud

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Comparing Cloud for Sales with older SaaS tools Comparing Cloud for Sales with older SaaS tools Document Transcript

  • A WINNING CLOUD SALES SOLUTION SAP Cloud for Sales Redefines Sales Effectiveness Executive Summary Enterprise sales organizations find themselves at the center of a digitally connected world. Sales professionals stand at the front line dealing with changes in relationship management due to more digitally sophisticated customers, and competitors who are racing to use social, mobile, and analytics advantageously in today’s business environment. The question comes down to whether your sales team will win more often by taking advantage of markets in flux and digital-infused strategic selling, or fall behind. Will your team learn to use social, mobile, and analytics to improve your sales effectiveness, mainly by better understanding customers, but also by helping you make better sales decisions and operate more efficiently relative to your competition? HIGHLIGHTS Vendor name: SAP Product name: SAP Cloud for Sales Product function: SaaS Enterprise CRM for Sales Availability: Currently Available While awareness of digitally driven markets and customers, and recognition of the need to make appropriate investments to take advantage of the situation, count as prerequisites for winning, another prerequisite is to use the right sales tools. Over a decade ago, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solutions entered the market, and many sales teams jumped on the SaaS sales solution bandwagon. Unfortunately, some of those solutions were designed before social, mobile, and analytics became commonplace. Those older solutions have since been bypassed by newer solutions that natively improve sales effectiveness by putting the power of social, mobile, and analytics into the hands of sales practitioners. What should sales teams look for in a SaaS sales solution right now? • Natively mobile: The sales user experience should seem almost identical no matter what device a sales person chooses to use, and on-the-road sellers should have everything they need to understand, engage and win with customers. • Social for sales: Instead of generic social capabilities, social tools for sales should have a look and feel similar to Facebook or LinkedIn, but should enable sales to collaborate in the context of each customer and the stage of the sale. • Pleasure to use: If not all salespeople use the sales tool, confusion ensues. The SaaS sales solution should come across as extremely friendly to use, and specifically designed with sales in mind. • Useful analytics: Nobody expects salespeople to act like data scientists, but big data style analytics, put into the proper, easy-to-digest context, should be at sales’ disposal, not just for performance measurement, but also to gain deeper insight into customers’ value and potential needs. • End-to-end execution: The buying process doesn’t stop at the customer pitch. Today’s sales tools must enable sellers to execute to the last mile of the deal, including real-time pricing, quotes, deal negotiation and order management. SAP Cloud for Sales stands out as a SaaS sales solution that meets the above criteria, and then some. With best-in-class integration, particularly for organizations using SAP ERP, SAP Cloud for Sales exemplifies the modern SaaS solution for sales. It helps salespeople and sales management operate more effectively and better manage enterprise relationships, aided by the latest technologies. PRODUCT VIEW | 1 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • An Introduction to Enterprise Sales in a Digitally Connected World Before 2000, enterprise relationships were primarily nurtured at a distance by phone, email, and physical mail, or face-to-face, and usually a combination thereof. What fundamentally changed since 2000, and what is now the norm, is that both at-a-distance and face-to-face engagements have become digitized. Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud (SMAC) technologies have permanently changed relationship management in enterprise sales. Today, even face-to-face engagements often involve tablets and smartphones instead of simple conversation and printed collateral. The digitally connected world has forever altered the dynamics of selling, with the following specific implications: • The connected customer: With an abundance of information literally at their fingertips, customers and prospects are better informed, quickly shift loyalties, negotiate harder, and hold sales up to a higher standard of transparency and depth. Salespeople and sales organizations that successfully meet customers’ digitally heightened expectations win more often. • Strategic selling redefined: Strategic selling yields better long-term ROI and more satisfied relationships, both important outcomes in enterprise sales that produce higher revenue per sale. Here in the SMAC era, however, strategic selling stretches into new circles of influence. For example, strategically applied social media may turn customers into active agents of referral and promotion. Salespeople who thoughtfully apply digital techniques in a strategic selling context widen the ROI gap even further over those with less digitally enhanced skills. • Accurate and easy-to-find customer information: The digitally enriched world yields more customer information, more market signals, and more related touch points than ever before. All this data may work for or against a salesperson, because while digitization may empower factbased selling, the sheer volume of data, and how to locate data may overwhelm some salespeople. Accurate and easy-to-find customer information leads to more well understood customers, thus stronger relationships, and more apropos and timely offers. • Sales agility and efficiency: In general, best-in-class salespeople and sales managers effectively use social, mobile, and analytics throughout their working day. Such sales professionals move through sales cycles with greater agility and efficiency, contribute more readily to wider sales team, and are out in front of red flags and hidden opportunities. It behooves every enterprise salesperson to learn how to turn SMAC into a winning advantage, but it is equally as imperative for sales managers to learn and apply social, mobile, and analytics in their roles due to some of the following situations: • Competition: Your sales organization is not the only organization experiencing seemingly constant transformation due to SMAC. Competitors also feel the impact and opportunity of SMAC, and they too are adjusting. The result is a more competitive environment. It behooves every enterprise salesperson to learn how to turn SMAC into a winning advantage, but it is equally as imperative for sales managers to learn and apply social, mobile, and analytics in their roles. • Grow with fewer resources: The never-ending march toward improving margins and pressures on SG&A expenses has been stepped-up due to SMAC. Executive management expects sales management to take advantage of SMAC on both sides of the P&L. Therefore, using SMAC to better identify, recruit, retain, and incentivize optimal performers and teams has become tantamount to sales management success. • Market redefinition: Sales management directly participates in helping the business identify and penetrate new markets, both geographically and horizontally. The “Google-ization” of enterprises all over the world, however, has blurred many market boundaries. Sales management needs, therefore, to communicate constantly with their teams to stay abreast of new opportunities, and to proactively use social and analytics tools to continuously detect and qualify market shifts. PRODUCT VIEW | 2 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • • Real sales strategy: The opportunity to identify sales strategies that directly align with business objectives has increased due to advancements in customer and market intelligence, and related analytics. Today’s adept sales manager uses advanced tools to ensure that the sales team understands, is incentivized, and has the metrics to pursue the goals of the business. Best Models for SaaS for Sales for the SMAC Generation The transformation of sales and sales management in the SMAC era has generated new requirements for the tools salespeople use to do their job. Though SaaS sales solutions trace their roots back to the late 1990s, today’s SaaS for sales solutions that natively fail to take best advantage of social, mobile, and analytics are outdated. The sales organizations that use those older SaaS tools operate at a disadvantage. Here are some of the more important requirements and related benefits enterprise sales professionals should look for today from their SaaS for sales solution: The transformation of sales and sales management in the SMAC era has generated new requirements for the tools salespeople use to do their job. • Sales effectiveness: The primary goal of any sales solution is to help salespeople become more effective at their jobs. For salespeople trying to stay afloat with all the processes and data brought on by the impact of SMAC, the sales solution has to make the job easier. Many sales solutions force salespeople to re-enter redundant data, to hunt for customer information that should be instantly available, to leave the context of the sales solution in order to communicate with other members of the team, and to review key customer information outside of the sales application. The SaaS sales solution must become an almost unconscious extension of the salesperson, increasing effectiveness across the sales experience. • Mobile from the start: Despite all the digitization, enterprise salespeople still jump into airplanes, drive to see clients, telecommute, or work out of sparse satellite offices. Salespeople, therefore, strongly prefer lightweight mobile devices. Tablets and smartphones are usually the devices of choice and many salespeople use several mobile devices. It is common for a salesperson to actively use a laptop, a tablet, and a smartphone. SaaS sales solutions, therefore, must be natively mobile. Radically different looking and acting mobile extensions don’t cut it; the SaaS sales solution should be designed with “mobile always” in mind and should, as much as possible given the differences in devices, offer similar user experiences, sales processes, and sales relevant information. • Pleasure to use: Sales management has historically struggled convincing sales practitioners to use sales tools, which renders risk into the entire sales operation. “Some use it, some don’t” is not an acceptable result. It turns out that SaaS sales solutions that are truly easy to use, even a pleasure to use, tend to be the solutions most actively adopted team-wide. Today’s SaaS sales solution should meet the gold standard of “zero training required.” In addition, given SMAC, the solution should natively, and easily, include social and instantly digestible yet meaningful analytics. Social and analytics usage in the context of the SaaS sales solution should not come across as afterthoughts or add-ons, and should not incur additional training costs. • Truly integrated: Personal productivity tools, such as Microsoft Outlook and Lotus Notes, remain the dominant email and contact management tools in enterprises. ERP long ago proliferated into enterprises and today virtually every Global 2000 company uses automated order management, finance and accounting (“F&A”), and human capital management (“HCM”) solutions. Sales personnel use personal productivity, order management, F&A, and HCM on a daily basis, either implicitly or explicitly. The state-of-the-art, truly integrated SaaS sales solution, therefore, should integrate with other applications so seamlessly that the sales person does not even realize that an application context switch is taking place; integration should take place quietly behind the scenes. PRODUCT VIEW | 3 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • • Collaborative and social: Effective sales people do not live in a vacuum. While access to social media and email provide the basics of collaboration, collaboration across top sales teams go further. Salespeople develop tricks, best practices, shortcuts, and discover important industry information that, if shared, may help other team members. It is not advisable, however, that salespeople use Facebook or Twitter to share information with the internal sales team. Instead, safe, subject-specific spaces to post and share information among the sales team should come as naturally in the modern SaaS sales solution as sending an email. • Functional breadth and depth: IT was right. Sales teams did lose functionality in many cases when they switched from on-premise to SaaS. In fact, many organizations became split shops, where, for example, the sales tool for line salespeople moved to SaaS, but sales management and customer service solutions remained on-premise, often with less than perfect integration between the parts. SaaS has been around long enough now, however, that: (a) the full on-premise breadth and depth SAP Cloud for Sales, by being of functionality should be available as part of a SaaS sales solution; a smart second-mover, has and (b) the simple navigation afforded by SaaS should apply to all jumped over first-generation sales experiences. That is, the new generation of SaaS solutions for SaaS sales solutions in terms sales should offer the best of both worlds, the ease of SaaS and the full of propelling sales effectiveness features of on-premise. SAP Cloud for Sales, by being a smart second-mover, has jumped over firstgeneration SaaS sales solutions in terms of propelling sales effectiveness, such as solutions offered by Salesforce.com and NetSuite, precisely because SAP originally designed and built Cloud for Sales with social, mobile, and analytics in mind. Here, in more detail, is why SAP Cloud for Sales is so effective. precisely because SAP originally designed and built Cloud for Sales with social, mobile, and analytics in mind. Product Description: How SAP Cloud for Sales Measures Up User Experience, Intuitive Yet Flexible Start with the user experience: The first two criteria identified for a successful SaaS solution for sales were “sales effectiveness” and “pleasure to use.” SAP intentionally designed SAP Cloud for Sales so that sales personnel would want to use it, not just have to use it. The trick was to make the user experience feel like it was custom designed for salespeople. The resulting user interface includes sales-specific functions on the left, and less formal but related functions, such as RSS feeds, a shelf for favorites or flagged items, and product information, on the right. It takes a salesperson no time at all to “get it.” In addition, it only takes a few clicks for a salesperson to customize their user experience if they so desire (see Figure 1 for an example). Many salespeople seem to actively use the shelf to keep their most imminent and imperative work close at hand, such as hot leads that need near-term follow-up, and important new contact to follow-up who just joined a longstanding customer, or deliverables required by management. PRODUCT VIEW | 4 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • Figure 1: SAP Cloud for Sales: Sales Effectiveness-Focused User Experience (Source: SAP, 2013) Today’s SaaS sales solution should meet the gold standard of “zero training required.” Rather than the old-style SaaS sales app with a late 1990s, ungainly Web interface consisting of static clicks, SAP Cloud for Sales enables drag-and-drop and hover-and-click. While naturally the user experience is not identical on all devices, SAP has made every effort to offer similar experiences across device types. In addition, SAP took its commitment to a superior user experience a step further by putting the same UI into related products, such as SAP Cloud for Service, and SAP Cloud for Social Engagement. Some sales personnel do not want to tailor their layout at all, but some do, and SAP makes it easy for those that like to customize to add their own toolbars, create a personalized tile user interface, and add or remove information fields. Regardless, if the entire sales team willfully uses the SaaS sales application, the entire team and business reap benefits. PRODUCT VIEW | 5 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • Mobile It does not matter what device or browser a salesperson chooses to use, and most choose to use multiple devices and browsers, SAP Cloud for Sales offers a near-identical experience. All of the mobile variations come built-in as part of the package, meaning there are no additional charges or training efforts. Mobile is part of the standard subscription. SAP Cloud for Sales also offers data download so salespeople on airplanes or in places lacking an internet connection may still work offline. Superior Personal Productivity Integration SAP decided to use a straightforward but effective approach to integrate Microsoft Outlook and Lotus Notes with SAP Cloud for Sales, augmented by data integration in the background. For example, using a simple, visual SAP Cloud for Sales dropdown in Microsoft Office, the sales user may choose to synchronize all associated emails for a particular opportunity or account into SAP Cloud for Sales. Similarly, contact information easily flows between Cloud for Sales and the two pervasive personal productivity applications. SAP assumed that sales personnel would use personal productivity and SaaS sales applications simultaneously, and therefore broke down the information barriers between the two while keeping the information in a sales context. Built-in ERP and Other Integration For organizations already using SAP for ERP and/or CRM applications, it should come as no surprise that SAP has made every effort to include full process and data integration for SAP Cloud for Sales for all the other SAP applications it touches. The positive impact on sales agility, effectiveness, and accurate customer information of this integration cannot be underestimated. Here are a few salient examples: For organizations already using SAP for ERP and/or CRM applications, it should come as no surprise that SAP has made every effort to include full process and data integration for SAP Cloud for Sales for all the other SAP applications it touches. 1. Order management: With SAP Cloud for Sales, it literally takes seconds to convert a quote into an order, with automated pricing and data insertion, without leaving the sales application. Similarly, when a salesperson adds a new purchasing contact in SAP Cloud for Sales, the contact information automatically synchronizes with order management. That way, when an order is processed or shipped, there is no duplicate data entry, thereby reducing chances for mistakes, and resulting in a quicker and less error prone processes. 2. Account data synchronization: Sales personnel, with a couple of clicks, are pushed all the latest order status and invoicing information for a given account. There is no need to perform searches, and then click and review a list of possible orders and invoices – SAP Cloud for Sales with its ERP integration simply provides the applicable information. 3. Pricing accuracy and quote generation: When a salesperson asks for a pricing update on SAP Cloud for Sales during quote preparation, SAP’s integration automatically finds the contracted pricing for the customer, inserts it, and then generates an applicable quote in a few clicks. All the resulting and related quote and contract documents are fed automatically to the salesperson. 4. Pipeline management and analytics: Sales professionals automatically receive all the applicable transactional and pipeline information in an analytics “what if ” dashboard. Since analytics and all transactional information relevant for pipeline management are on a single screen, salespeople tend to find the pipeline optimization easy to use. Also, the sales manager may simulate pipeline changes, identify gaps, and identify critical opportunities to help guide the sales team. These four examples barely scratch the surface of what SAP offers in terms of built-in ERP integration. First-generation SaaS sales application providers have struggled to integrate their offerings with other ERP packages, often depending on third-party integration tools to provide the basics. While SAP naturally prefers, and frankly does a superior job, at self-integration, SAP also offers process and data integration tools enabling customers to integrate with non-SAP applications, whether packaged or custom. PRODUCT VIEW | 6 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • SAP Cloud for Sales does not stop there in terms of integration, however. SAP offers a long list of open APIs so that other application vendors may easily integrate with SAP Cloud for Sales. Finally, SAP, recognizing that a few other sales and marketing application providers are also state-of-the-art, includes pre-built integration to several leading specialty products, including Xactly for incentive compensation, Marketo for marketing automation, and InsideView for extended customer and prospect profiles. Analytics in Context of the Customer Every salesperson wants to see how they are performing, or are likely to perform, and some sales people may want to drill down into why. Basic dashboards and analytics designed specifically for salespeople, that are simple to invoke and grasp, and are real-time in the sense of using the most recent available information, are what most sales people need. The goal is to provide analytics that will help salespeople spend more time selling, but to sell with more customer insight and strategically. While SAP Cloud for Sales indeed offers a rich yet simple and contextually apropos set of dashboards and analytics for salespeople, SAP added some other unique features. One option portrays the salesperson’s entire portfolio, pipeline, quota, performance and key engagements as an infographic. Many sales people choose this feature as a kind of “home page;” when they log in first thing in the business day they immediately see an infographic snapshot of how they are doing, and what needs attending to. Even the default dashboard, see Figure 2, uses a modern tile user experience with embedded analytics, a vast improvement over many other SaaS sales solutions. Figure 2: Example of Insight-Infused Homepage (Source: SAP, 2013) Finally, for the more analytically inclined salesperson, SAP Cloud for Sales offers the ability to customize dashboards, drill-up, drill-down, add or subtract information, and alter the chart type. Salespeople may then pop the chart out for use in a presentation, or to email to the sales manager, or to post to SAP Jam, the SAP Cloud for Sales collaboration tool. What stands out as strongly differentiated for SAP Cloud for Sales, however, is the inclusion of what SAP calls “Customer Value Intelligence.” PRODUCT VIEW | 7 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • Customer Value Intelligence, a Big Data style analytics tool, enables even the least analytically oriented salesperson to compare and contrast the value of customers to the business, using several straightforward by customizable metrics, such as margin. It enables salespeople to easily classify customers, and to therefore make better choices for customer engagement and pricing. See Figure 3 for a sample. Figure 3: Customer Value Intelligence Example – to easily identify the most valuable customers to target (Source: SAP, 2013) The analytics of SAP Cloud for Sales were designed precisely for the context of what the salesperson is trying to accomplish. In far too many SaaS CRM solutions, the business intelligence seems remarkably generic and confusing, as if it were plugged in as an afterthought, with the potential of doing more damage than good. SAP has elegantly inserted sophisticated yet easy to navigate analytics that are actually used and useful by salespeople. Collaboration for the Full Sales Lifecycle With all the social and collaborative offerings in the marketplace, why would SAP bother to “reinvent the wheel” by building their own specific collaborative environment for sales? SAP calls its collaborative environment “Jam,” and salespeople are usually pleasantly surprised to see how well SAP Jam works in the context of not just the sales team, but for all the players and processes that go into the sales lifecycle. First, however, Jam is mobile, like the rest of SAP Cloud for Sales. Second, the personnel who may join and participate in Jam include service personnel, product managers, engineers, even partners or customers; whoever makes sense in the context of the sales lifecycle. Third, Jam may reflect information from all those entities; from sales, service, products, marketing, etc. A long list of potentially beneficially collaborations may ensue, from micro-blogging on a particular product or account, to sharing tools and media for on-boarding, from building private groups with specific feeds about pricing strategies, to sharing collateral and contracts with partners. For example, Jam, using influence analytics, offers pictorial clues of the most influential people associated with an account or deal (see Figure 4). PRODUCT VIEW | 8 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • Figure 4: Cloud for Sales and Jam Example – in context collaboration with everyone needed (Source: SAP, 2013) It is clear that, unlike some other collaboration tools offered by earlier generation SaaS offerings, SAP leaned on the likes of Facebook and LinkedIn for its Jam design, perhaps knowing that a similar experience would entice sales personnel to actively use Jam. Jam was designed with the idea of increasing sales effectiveness in mind, and to help the business grow with fewer resources. Cockpit for the Sales Performance Management SAP Cloud for Sales includes Sales Performance Management (SPM) capabilities for sales managers and sales reps. Like the rest of SAP Cloud for Sales, SAP designed SPM from the get-go to enable the new-generation sales manager and rep to do a superior job of performance management. SPM’s cockpit architecture was built around a maturity model that includes quota achievement, sales effectiveness, execution to strategy alignment, and strategic selling. Some additional key features include: • Like everything else in Cloud for Sales, SPM capabilities are 100% mobile. • SPM includes a full complement of tactical sub-modules; examples include territory management, recruiting, deal pricing management, performance management, and incentives and commissions. • Several analytics-driven discovery-style sub-modules, such as sales pipeline simulations, customer classification, and strategic value insight, are part of the solution. See Figure 5 for an example. PRODUCT VIEW | 9 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • Figure 5: Example of Sales Performance Management Analytics (Source: SAP, 2013) SPM also integrates with other core SAP solutions, bringing into play, for example, HCM data and processes for recruiting, on-boarding, and objectives management. Already well integrated with SAP’s SuccessFactors, sales managers using SPM may even communicate with candidates through social media, and collaboratively obtain candidate feedback. Old SaaS vs. New SaaS Side-by-Side There is no such thing as a perfect sales solution, whether SaaS or on-premise, and whether working on a PC, tablet, or smartphone. Just when a new-generation solution reaches the market, another solution is adding or perfecting a fresh set of features. It is a constant race; however, enough of a functional and ease-of-use gap has accrued between first-generation SaaS (for example, Salesforce.com or NetSuite), and recent-generation SaaS (such as SAP Cloud for Sales), it is worth highlighting the major differences (see Table 1). Feature Older SaaS SAP Cloud for Sales User Experience 1.  eneric user interface – click and G view, and click and view again. 2. No drag and drop, no hover and click. 3. Constant hunting for the right resources. 4. Obvious application context switching. 5.  ifferent device? Different D experience. No mobile download. 1.  ser interface specifically designed U around most common sales functions. 2.  ore advanced user experience, M e.g. drag and drop, hover etc. 3.  ata and document resources D automatically pushed based on sales processes and context. 4.  seamless “one application” experience, A regardless of the actual applications operating in the background. 5.  imilar experience regardless of device S form factor – phone, tablet, PC, Mac, Android. Offline option for all devices. (Table continued on next page) PRODUCT VIEW | 10 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • Feature Older SaaS SAP Cloud for Sales Mobile 1. ndividual mobile modules added I piecemeal over the course of time, requiring additional management and training. 2.  ser experiences custom U developed for mobile add-ons. 3.  dditional subscriptions costs A for mobile features. 4. Primarily online capabilities only. 1.  ll features and functions available from A the outset for all devices and browsers. 2.  ommon user experience C regardless of device or browser. 3.  ull mobility included in core subscription. F 4. Offline capabilities. Social and Collaboration First generation collaboration tools with zero custom subject sandboxes for sales operations and processes. Weak support for rich media, and not designed intentionally for use beyond sales personnel. Collaboration designed along the lines of modern social computing tools, using secure collaborative sandboxes, and the option to specify contextual groupings around, for example, accounts, products, etc. Designed for extended team collaboration. Integration Little to no personal productivity integration. ERP Integration as an afterthought; first generation SaaS for sales applications were designed in silos. Smooth, end-to-end ERP process integration practically impossible – broken into many micro-integrations. Best-in-class, two-way Microsoft Outlook and Lotus Notes integration including account, contact and email synchronization. Full SAP ERP integration, such as, products, pricing, order management, contract management, F&A, HCM. 3rd party integration through SAP process and data integration tools, open APIs, and pre-built integration with bestof-breed application providers. Analytics The most basic of analytics, with little to no flexibility, and seldom in the context of a specific sales process. Advanced analytics added through acquisition or 3rd party, not embedded natively into the sales solution. No UI preference or customization for analytics included (e.g. infographic). 1.  complete set of in-process sales A dashboards and analytics, using compelling charts and graphs, with easy manipulation, plus reporting based on information from different sources. 2.  ore advanced analytic options based M on information from different sources, including information selection, graph selection, sharing, and “what if” analysis, spanning the operational sales process and sales performance management. 3.  dvanced customer analytics apps, for A “Customer Value Intelligence” and “Social Contact Intelligence” solution that includes predictive action and recommendations to meet business requirements. Management Similar to basic sales application with additional sub-modules for tactical sales management. A maturity model-driven sales management approach, focusing on sales strategy. Includes HCM integration for recruiting, analytics-rich sub-modules for organizational and territory design, objectives management, and a KPIoptimized sales management dashboard. Table 1. Old SaaS sales solutions versus SAP Cloud for Sales PRODUCT VIEW | 11 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com
  • EMA Perspective: Believe Your Eyes, Not the Hype SAP has been an ERP and CRM leader for many years, but took its time moving to Software-as-aService offerings. There are two ways to interpret what SAP has done on this front – they were either slow-to-market, or, they took their time to do SaaS right. Judging by SAP Cloud for Sales, the latter seems more accurate. SAP Cloud for Sales explicitly has applied SMAC technologies to help sales personnel excel in a business world that too is social, mobile, and analytics-aware. Sales executives involved in making decisions as to which sales tools to use should take a close look at SAP Cloud for Sales, and avoid buying a solution based on marketing hype. Some other key considerations: • Organizations already using SAP on-premise CRM modules, including sales modules, will find it quite simple to also use SAP Cloud for Sales – SAP supports both hybrid and full cloud offerings. • At this time, SAP Cloud for Sales supports Apple iOS, Google Android and Blackberry mobile operating environments, and also Windows 8 devices through HTML5. • Some future improvements in SaaS sales solutions will be to include frameworks from sales best practices methodologies, playbook sales techniques, predictive opportunity identification, and “sphere of influence” relationship finder capabilities. SAP already offers some of these advanced features, but it would behoove SAP and its customers to continue to invest in these areas of innovation as a first mover. • SAP has recently made some other SaaS acquisitions, such as Hybris for e-commerce. It is likely SAP will integrate those new SaaS family members just as SAP has done between SAP Cloud for Sales and SuccessFactors. On the customer experience side, SAP is also pursuing a common user experience project known as “Fiori,” and customers should therefore expect SAP Cloud for Sales to further enhance it user experience through Fiori-based design during 2014. • Finally, the much talked about SAP HANA received initial certification as an operational database for the SAP Business Suite earlier in 2013, and just became available for SAP Cloud for Sales. Therefore new, or migrating, customers enjoy the increased performance associated with SAP HANA. Organizations that want to use SMAC to their sales advantage would be hard-pressed to find a better sales solution than SAP Cloud for Sales. From strategic selling, to timely and accurate customer information, from doing more with less, to more effective sales operations, and having sales personnel actively using a tool to help your business break into new customer circles and markets, SAP Cloud for Sales plays to win. About EMA From strategic selling, to timely and accurate customer information, from doing more with less, to more effective sales operations, and having sales personnel actively using a tool to help your business break into new customer circles and markets, SAP Cloud for Sales plays to win. Founded in 1996, Enterprise Management Associates (EMA) is a leading industry analyst firm that provides deep insight across the full spectrum of IT and data management technologies. EMA analysts leverage a unique combination of practical experience, insight into industry best practices, and in-depth knowledge of current and planned vendor solutions to help its clients achieve their goals. Learn more about EMA research, analysis, and consulting services for enterprise line of business users, IT professionals and IT vendors at www.enterprisemanagement.com or blogs.enterprisemanagement.com. You can also follow EMA on Twitter or Facebook. 2749.111913 PRODUCT VIEW | 12 ©2013 Enterprise Management Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved. | www.enterprisemanagement.com