The Mobile Consumer
Insights on Asia Pacific Trends Impacting Mobile Momentum and Customer Engagement

A Mobile-Centric Wor...
The Mobile Consumer

© 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

Insights on Asia Pacific Trends
Impa...
Table of Contents
4

Introduction

5	

Devices,	Appetite	and	Use

10	 Maturity,	Lifestyle	and	Work
14	 Preferences	and	Lev...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

Creating demand for mobile services relies on
an understanding of mobile u...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

Introduction
Regional appetite for different mobile services
and applicati...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

Devices, Appetite and Use
move in the direction of increased channels of
m...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

are all above the global average. As observed 	
in the sample, this potent...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

when transacting and communicating via their
mobile device (Figure 3). Add...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

of 80% and highlights the extent to which 	
APAC consumers have become use...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

The majority of APAC respondents agree
that they rely on their mobile phon...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

Maturity, Lifestyle and Work
The emerging markets of India and China show
...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

.

compared to the mature markets of Australia
(47%) and Japan (37%).

mob...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

There are many factors that underpin
trends within the APAC region, and th...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

Consumers across the globe have witnessed
simultaneously an increase in th...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

.

Preferences and Levers
Consumers globally have seen an increase in
the ...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

.

In part, these national variations are down to the
maturity of the mark...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

such as prompts or characteristics of the operating
environment. Findings ...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

There is general agreement in the region (70%)
with the view that mobile p...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

.

Mobile Wallet Opportunities
Figure 9 shows that checking usage data for...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

.

Furthermore, APAC users believe that once they
gain confidence in mobil...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

While there is potential for growing complexity
in mobile transactional of...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

On its current trajectory, mobile occupies a
tempting combination of loyal...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

.

Conclusion
The commitment to mobile as a recognised
‘transactional devi...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

.

engage at a higher level, and they seek to do so
simply and effectively...
The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific

.

Consumers will be increasingly
influenced by service excellence
over te...
Appendix

Research Methodology
3,288 interviews were conducted with adults 	
aged 18+ who own a mobile phone (basic or
sma...
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SAP Mobile Consumer Survey Report_APAC

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Whether you’re fine-tuning your mobile commerce and engagement strategy or transforming it entirely, the new SAP Mobile Consumer Survey Report will be a critical enabler for your business to harness the growing global consumer appetite for mobile. Visit www.sapmobileconsumertrends.com/anz/ to learn more.

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Transcript of "SAP Mobile Consumer Survey Report_APAC"

  1. 1. The Mobile Consumer Insights on Asia Pacific Trends Impacting Mobile Momentum and Customer Engagement A Mobile-Centric World 68% increase in consumers using their mobile phone for more activities other than making calls and texting 65% rely on their mobile phone to help manage their lifestyle 55% Becoming a Mobile Commerce World 46% purchased products or services Why? Use devices on the go Convenience Can use mobile device at any time of the day Speed access the Internet via their mobile daily What do They Buy? There are Speed Bumps Along the Way Entering lots of information 45% Safety concerns 41% Lack of network connection 39% 55% 52% 50% 49% Clothes/footware/other attire 49% Books/e-books 47% Telecom bill 46% 84% want to buy more on their mobile devices So What do You Need to do? Underscoring assurances regarding personal data security (57%) and create and/or highlight easy-to-use interfaces (53%) are the key drivers for increased adoption of mobile transactions and communications. 70% agree mobile will become an important payment method Insights from the Report Tickets Those who have purchased tickets by mobile: Would use mobile more if incentivised by brands/services Would like to respond to a promotion or make use of an offer Bills Those who have paid bills by mobile: Would use mobile more if had more confidence in mobile security Would like to research products or make a bank transfer via mobile More sophisticated purchases need more complex levers © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. Retail Those who have bought goods by mobile: Would pay more by mobile if receive regular order updates or greater choice of payment methods Would like to sign up for a service/promotion or check the status of an order via mobile
  2. 2. The Mobile Consumer © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. Insights on Asia Pacific Trends Impacting Mobile Momentum and Customer Engagement
  3. 3. Table of Contents 4 Introduction 5 Devices, Appetite and Use 10 Maturity, Lifestyle and Work 14 Preferences and Levers 18 Mobile Wallet Oppportunities 22 Conclusion 25 Appendix © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 2 / 25
  4. 4. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific Creating demand for mobile services relies on an understanding of mobile user behaviour. The following report provides marketers in the mobile industry with insights on the global trends impacting mobile momentum. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 3 / 25
  5. 5. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific Introduction Regional appetite for different mobile services and applications varies dramatically, and the ways in which users transact and communicate via mobile depends on the activities undertaken. Cultural, economic and technology norms shape regional uses of mobile, whilst an array of user requirements influence preferences towards appropriate marketing channels, relationships and incentives as they shop, spend and surf. In order to make informed marketing decisions and better understand mobile momentum and customer engagement across the globe, SAP commissioned independent research among mobile users across 4 key regions, encompassing 17 countries: • North America (NAM) • Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) • Latin America (LATAM) • Asia Pacific (APAC) This report will focus in more detail on the Asia Pacific (APAC) region. For the purpose of this research, Asia Pacific is comprised of the following countries: • China • India • Japan • Australia Within the APAC region, Japan and Australia have already reached a level of mobile maturity, yet for India and China, mobile device use is evolving. This varied momentum contributes to differences in mobile ownership, appetite and behaviour. Growth in smartphone technology and the blur of social, mobile and traditional marketing channels has seen users becoming motivated by a range of complex factors. The greater the sophistication of mobile use, the greater the sophistication of consumer needs. As the commercial elements of mobile interaction continue to take shape, organisations capitalising on mobile channels need to balance the advancement of mobile functionality with these needs. Not all successful examples of mobility are based on ‘bleeding edge’ innovation. The right service for the right user, marketed in the right way is a simplistic, yet appropriate, mantra for marketing strategy in the mobile sector. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3,288 interviews were conducted with adults aged 18+ who own a mobile phone (basic or smartphone) in APAC (China n=1000, India n=1050, Japan n=651, Australia n=587). Respondents completed an online survey in March/April 2013. Research conducted by Loudhouse, an independent research agency based in London. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 4 / 25
  6. 6. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific Devices, Appetite and Use move in the direction of increased channels of mobile communication. APAC has the highest penetration of smartphones globally, with just over three quarters (76%) of smartphone users interviewed in the survey, a little higher than the global average of 72%. However, there is a level of variation across the APAC sample with ownership in the more mature markets of Japan (61%) and Australia (69%) being somewhat lower than in India (74%) and, in particular, China (92%). In general, more APAC users turn to their mobile device throughout the day than is the global norm. As with all regions, making or receiving calls is the most popular activity at 79% (rising to 91% in China and 95% in India), followed by sending or receiving texts (69%). At a secondary level, over half (55%) use their mobile phone on a daily basis for general Internet access or to send or receive emails (53%), highlighting a natural While daily banking via mobile and buying goods and services are just above the global level, APAC users are much more likely than the global average to use their mobile moderately (a few times a week or monthly) for banking (37% vs. 29% global) and buying goods and services (37% vs. 26% global). Again, these activities are led by India (38% banking and 39% purchases) and China (54% for both banking and purchases) in particular. Figure 1 shows that while online (70%) and in-store (73%) are the main ways that respondents have purchased goods and services in the past 12 months, APAC users are also looking to other channels for transaction. Purchase via mobile Internet (36%), via a downloadable app (24%) and via SMS (19%) Figure 1 Purchasing methods in past 12 months In store 73% Online (not via mobile phone) 70% By mobile phone - via mobile Internet 36% By telephone call (landline or mobile) 25% By mobile phone - via a downloadable app 24% Mail order By mobile phone - SMS Don’t know 21% 19% 2% Net: by mobile phone 46% © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 5 / 25
  7. 7. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific are all above the global average. As observed in the sample, this potentially also points to the high smartphone penetration in the region. Nevertheless, there is variation within the region with the emerging economies of China and India leading the way. (55%), that it is convenient (52%), can be used day or night (50%) and is quick (49%) are all key drivers for further adoption in the APAC region. Indeed, scores for usage on-the-go and convenience are both significantly higher than for EMEA and NAM. As Figure 2 shows, the benefits of communicating and transacting with organisations via mobile device for APAC users centre around the compatibility of mobile with their lifestyle. The fact that consumers can use their mobile on the go There are, however, some challenges raised by APAC users when communicating and transacting with organisations via their mobile, albeit at a slightly lower level than the global average. The key issue, cited by 45% of users, is the hassle of having to enter a lot of personal information Figure 2 Benefits of mobile interactions I can use it on the go 55% It’s convenient 52% I can use it at any time of the day or night 50% It’s quick 49% It’s easy to use 45% Receiving a quick response to queries 40% It’s free of charge (no postage, travel or call) 38% I can store details on my phone for future use 33% It fits in with my needs and lifestyle 29% It’s secure 25% It provides better information than other methods 20% Other benefits 4% Don’t know 4% I don’t think there are any benefits 8% © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 6 / 25
  8. 8. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific when transacting and communicating via their mobile device (Figure 3). Additionally, there are concerns over safety when using mobile for purchasing (41%), and also 39% state a potential lack of access to the Internet at the time of the transaction. Within the region, there is a slightly different picture depending on whether the market is mature or emerging. Safety is more important in the mature markets of Australia (43%) and Japan (37%), while the hassle of entering information is a deterrent for users in India (48%) and China (54%). Within the APAC region there appears to be huge potential for the future of mobile transactions, with 84% of users expressing an appetite for buying goods and services using their mobile phone in the future (Figure 4). This compares with 82% globally. Half of these users (42%) have never before used mobile transactions but would like to do so in the future, and half (42%) have used their mobile previously to buy goods and wish to make further purchases with their mobile. At a lower level, 14% have used their mobile to buy goods but are not expecting to use this method in the future. The interest in future purchases by mobile is further underpinned by 77% of users agreeing that organisations should use any available technology to make life easier for customers. This is marginally below the global average Figure 3 Challenges of mobile interactions Hassle of having to enter a lot of personal information 45% I don’t think it’s safe 41% I might not have Internet access at that time 39% Lack of immediate customer service 33% The interface is hard to see 27% I’m not interacting with a human being 23% I am able to communicate with service providers without my mobile phone 19% I don’t know how to do it Another challenge Don’t know There are no challenges 14% 7% 6% 7% © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 7 / 25
  9. 9. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific of 80% and highlights the extent to which APAC consumers have become used to, and expecting of, increasing sophistication of mobile connectivity with organisations. Indeed, users are increasingly willing to hold organisations accountable if they do not meet service levels and any technological advances in the future should look to also improve communication and interaction with customers. As with all regions, the majority of APAC users (72%) agree that they are often frustrated by automated voice phone systems when they call a service provider. Indeed, over half (58%) agree that they would be willing to switch to a different provider if they could interact with them better through their mobile phone. This is slightly higher than the global average of 54%. Figure 4 Appetite for purchasing via mobile Not used mobile to buy goods and content 2% Used mobile to buy goods and content 14% Used mobile to buy goods and want to do it more 42% Not used mobile to buy goods but want to 42% Net: Want to buy goods / more on mobile: 84% © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 8 / 25
  10. 10. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific The majority of APAC respondents agree that they rely on their mobile phone to help them manage their lifestyle. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 9 / 25
  11. 11. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific Maturity, Lifestyle and Work The emerging markets of India and China show an enthusiasm for a fast pace of change and the adoption of more sophisticated transactional activities via their mobile. In contrast, the more mature markets of Australia and Japan appear more reticent. This leads to key variations in response by users, and it is crucial for organisations to bear these regional distinctions in mind when planning marketing activity. depending on whether the user is a smartphone owner (49%) or owns a basic mobile (48%). However, there is variation within the region, with the emerging markets of India (68%) and China (54%) showing higher levels of agreement than the mature countries of Australia (17%) and Japan (22%). In line with the global view, under half of APAC users agree that they tend to use their mobile phone more for work than leisure activities. As Figure 5 shows, there is no real difference The majority of APAC respondents agree that they rely on their mobile phone to help them manage their lifestyle. There is some difference due to device type ownership, as highlighted in Figure 6, with smartphone owners (73%) somewhat more inclined to agree compared to basic Figure 5 Agreement with statement: “I tend to use my mobile phone more for work than for leisure activities” by ownership of mobile type Figure 6 Agreement with statement: “I rely on my mobile phone to help manage my lifestyle” 49% 48% 39% 58% 22% 29% 53% 11% 73% 62% 71% 51% APAC EMEA LATAM NAM APAC EMEA LATAM 73% 64% 58% 26% NAM Smartphone owners Smartphone owners Basic mobile phone owners Basic mobile phone owners © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 10 / 25
  12. 12. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific . compared to the mature markets of Australia (47%) and Japan (37%). mobile owners (62%). Again, these figures are driven by users in the emerging economies of India (80%) and China (75%) which show more inclination towards reliance on their mobile than the mature markets of Australia (48%) and Japan (41%). Two-thirds (68%) of APAC users agree that compared to 12 months ago, they now use their mobile phone for more activities other than just making calls and texting, which is above the global average of 63% (Figure 7). This figure is again clearly driven by the emerging markets of India (80%) and China (86%) who are enthusiastic in their adoption of new ways to use their mobile Nevertheless, while users in the mature APAC markets of Australia and Japan may not feel they are overly reliant on their mobile to manage their lifestyle, they do acknowledge the impact that not having their mobile would have. Over half (54%) of Australian users and 72% of Japanese users agree that having their mobile lost or stolen would really affect their personal productivity. The impact is felt even more keenly in the emerging markets of India (88%) and China (93%) where the reliance on mobile phones is more evident. Figure 7 Agreement with statement: “Compared to 12 months ago, I use my mobile phone for more activities other than making calls and texting/sending” Emerging mobile markets 87% 86% 84% 83% 80% Developing mobile markets 74% 69% 67% 66% 63% 63% Mature, saturated mobile markets 50% 47% 47% 44% 38% 37% APAC 68% Mexico China Chile Saudi Arabia India South Africa Egypt Colombia Russia Brazil Spain UK Australia France Germany USA Japan © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 11 / 25
  13. 13. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific There are many factors that underpin trends within the APAC region, and they can be summarised into three key areas: • Economy: More rapid GDP growth and relative consumer momentum in India and China compared to the mature markets of Australia and Japan • Infrastructure: Mobile network and mobile Internet services outperform legacy telecoms infrastructure in the emerging countries • Device Culture: Basic handset use and transactional SMS services are more prevalent in India and China as they adopt new services at a faster pace © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 12 / 25
  14. 14. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific Consumers across the globe have witnessed simultaneously an increase in the sophistication of mobile devices available and an increase in the complexity and variety of transactions that can be made via mobile. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 13 / 25
  15. 15. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific . Preferences and Levers Consumers globally have seen an increase in the sophistication of mobile devices available with a corresponding rise in the complex nature and scope of transactions that mobile now enables. Figure 8a groups various types of mobile purchases into three distinct categories: Tickets, Bills and Retail. These groups represent a spectrum of purchase complexity and motivations: • Tickets: simple purchases of paper or virtual tokens that provide access to a service or event • Bills: mandatory payments for goods or service already received or utilised • Retail: physical items purchased and commonly dispatched by post Within the APAC region, users engage with a variety of transaction complexities. Those who choose to purchase using their mobile are most likely to buy clothes (49%), purchase books or e-books (47%) or pay their telecom bills (46%) (Figure 8b). However, there are some distinct differences in the purchase activities undertaken across the region. Chinese users have adopted their mobile device as a channel for transactions with some enthusiasm and they are just as likely to purchase groceries (61%) as they are to buy clothes (61%) or pay telecoms bills (61%). Indian users are almost equal in their enthusiasm and are most likely to purchase tickets for travel (62%), buy Figure 8a Drivers for different purchase types using mobile Tickets Bills Retail • Would use mobile more • Would use mobile more if had • Would pay more by mobile if receive Those who have purchased tickets by mobile: Those who have paid bills by mobile: Those who have bought goods by mobile: if incentivised by brands/ more confidence in mobile regular order updates or greater choice services security of payment methods • Would like to respond to • Would like to research products • Would like to sign up for a service/ a promotion or make use or make a bank transfer via promotion or check the status of an of an offer mobile order via mobile More sophisticated purchases need more complex levers © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 14 / 25
  16. 16. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific . In part, these national variations are down to the maturity of the market and the higher level of engagement witnessed in emerging markets. In part, it will be a feature of the national culture. As such, it is key that organisations look to understand any national characteristics. One market is not the same as another, and there are variations within mature and emerging markets. entertainment services (54%) and pay telecoms bills (51%). The more mature markets of Japan and Australia are more restrained in their adoption of mobile transactions generally, yet there are some activities they feel more comfortable with. Japanese users are likely to buy groceries (40%), purchase books and e-books (39%) or buy clothes and other attire (27%) via mobile, while Australian users choose to buy entertainment services (36%) and purchase books and e-books (29%). Various marketing levers to encourage mobile use were evaluated against each purchase type in order to understand user preferences for factors Figure 8b Purchase types using mobile Clothes/footware/other attire 49% Books/e-books 47% Telecom bill (e.g. phone, Internet) 46% Groceries/food 33% Entertainment (e.g. cinema, theatre) 45% 44% Tickets for travel/transport 44% Music downloads (e.g. iTunes) 42% Utility bills (e.g. water, electricity) 34% Electronic appliances 31% Travel/holidays 26% Home furniture/goods 19% Jewellery 11% Other 11% Don’t know 2% Tickets Bills Retail © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 15 / 25
  17. 17. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific such as prompts or characteristics of the operating environment. Findings from this evaluation describe a relationship between purchase ‘drivers’ and purchase types that aligns the complexity of what is paid for with a sophistication of the journey to the item or service itself. In line with global thinking, 67% of APAC users agree that a greater choice of payment methods would encourage them to make a purchase from an organisation or retailer (vs. 64% globally). Again, it is the emerging markets of China (70%) and India (81%) that drive this level of agreement, with the mature markets of Australia (49%) and Japan (56%) being more reserved. 67% of APAC users agree that a greater choice of payment methods would encourage them to make a purchase from an organisation or retailer. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 16 / 25
  18. 18. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific There is general agreement in the region (70%) with the view that mobile phones will be more important as a payment method in the future. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 17 / 25
  19. 19. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific . Mobile Wallet Opportunities Figure 9 shows that checking usage data for the users mobile phone account, checking the status of an order and researching products, prices and tariffs are activities that APAC users would like to do via their mobile phone and which they feel are relatively easy to accomplish currently. Users carry out these simple tasks on a frequent basis, yet they would like to be able to complete more sophisticated and multi-faceted actions. However, activities such as paying a bill or making a bank transfer are believed to be much more complex and difficult to achieve through mobile, but there is a high level of demand to undertake these tasks. In line with global opinion, there is general agreement in the region (70%) with the view that mobile phones will be more important as a payment method in the future. This figure rises to 76% in China and 84% in India. Figure 9 Opportunities – ease of mobile interactions vs. demand for mobile interactions Would like to do more of via mobile More demand Checking the status of an order Paying a bill Making a bank transfer Buying goods Checking usage or submitting usage data for utilities Paying money to a friend or family member Researching products, prices or tariffs Checking usage data for my mobile phone account Communicating with a customer service department Signing up for a service or promotion  Responding to a promotion or making use of an offer Changing contact details or personal information Entering a competition Setting up a new account Less demand Hard Ease of doing on mobile phone Easy © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 18 / 25
  20. 20. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific . Furthermore, APAC users believe that once they gain confidence in mobile security (54%) and assurance in how to use their mobile device as a payment method (40%), they will increase their mobile payment activity. Indeed, as Figure 10 also shows, assurances about personal data security (57%) and an easy-to-use interface (53%) are the key drivers for increased adoption of mobile transactions and communications in APAC markets. At a secondary level, free Wi-Fi Internet access being available in more places (51%) and receiving discounts, offers and coupons (48%) are also important drivers towards increased mobile purchasing and interactions. The demand for further enhanced yet simpler transaction capabilities by mobile is highlighted in user expectations of a ‘mobile wallet’. APAC users expect to be able to pay a bill (54%), buy goods online (53%) and use it as a means to Figure 10 Drivers to communicate/transact more via mobile phone Assurances about personal data security 57% Easy-to-use interface 53% Free wifi Internet access in more places 51% Receiving discounts, offers or coupons 48% Instant/real-time help available 42% More shops and retailers offering mobile communications 34% More information on how it works 33% More mobile phones on the market that enable sophisticated communications 29% Knowing that someone is personally helping you Something else Don’t know Nothing would encourage me 25% 7% 4% 11% © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 19 / 25
  21. 21. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific While there is potential for growing complexity in mobile transactional offerings, the importance of personal and data security and ease of use should not be overlooked by organisations at any point in the innovation process, as these are the ultimate drivers for future take-up of mobile products and services. check their bank balance (52%) (Figure 11). Within the region, users in China, India and also Australia were more decisive on what they expected from the mobile wallet, with views from Japanese users at a somewhat lower level. Figure 11 Expectations of a mobile wallet Pay a bill 54% Buy goods online 53% Check my bank balance 52% Make a bank transfer 47% Check the status of an order 43% Buy goods costing a small amount 42% Buy goods in a shop 40% Research products, prices or tarrifs 39% Choice to pay with a variety of payment methods or cards 38% Pay money to a friend or family member 38% Check usage data for my mobile phone account 38% Check usage or submit usage data for utilities 37% Top up mobile phone credit 35% Communicate with a customer service department 31% Enable me to use loyalty cards 30% Sign up for a service or promotion 29% Respond to a promotion or make use of an offer 28% Change contact details or personal information 27% Share contact details with friends or family 27% Set up a new account 23% Enter a competition 22% Buy goods costing a large amount None of these Don’t know 21% 8% 7% © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 20 / 25
  22. 22. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific On its current trajectory, mobile occupies a tempting combination of loyalty card, cash, research tool, location tracker and credit card. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 21 / 25
  23. 23. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific . Conclusion The commitment to mobile as a recognised ‘transactional device’ changes both the marketing potential and data capabilities offered by mobile services. On its current trajectory, mobile occupies a tempting combination of loyalty card, cash, research tool, location tracker and credit card. This transition raises the stakes for organisations marketing and connecting to customers either exclusively via mobile or as part of a multichannel mix. Brand loyalty becomes essential as any business on the mobile browser has the potential to own the customer relationship and all service providers now compete for mindshare in a space that was once the exclusive domain of telecoms businesses. The research points to five key elements that should inform CMO thinking to best tackle the challenges that lay ahead. The Pace of Change The Mobile Consumer research survey shows an international mobile user community running at different speeds, maturing at different rates and presenting different opportunities, creating marketing complexity. Within the APAC region, the emerging economies of India and China are more enthusiastic about a mobile future and make an explicit link between increasing mobility and its impact on their lives. They are less reliant on leading edge technology to drive behaviour, and are eager to try new things. The more mature APAC economies of Japan and Australia are less impulsive and appear somewhat indifferent to the mobile pace and potential. Nevertheless, these markets acknowledge the importance and benefit of more integrated, easier-to-use yet sophisticated mobile products and services. Adoption Options ‘Macro-momentum’ may differ across the APAC region, but the research also shows that users express preferences around the functionality and models of engagement based on the type of mobile activity they undertake. Checking a train time is about ease of use, buying the ticket is about speed and security, while reserving a hotel room or buying a travel case for the journey online requires various kinds of prompts and assurances: payment choice, status checking, incentives and customer service. Opportunity Optimisation Users enjoy undertaking simple informationbased activities as they are easy and, in return, convenient to do. Yet complex functionality brings with it practical challenges. A significant opportunity exists for mobile service providers and brands to capitalise upon. Providers should understand that users now expect to be able to © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 22 / 25
  24. 24. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific . engage at a higher level, and they seek to do so simply and effectively. Providers are tasked with meeting and exceeding these expectations. transactional data security while retaining a simple and easy to use format will be crucial in underpinning any future rise in consumer purchase take-up. Simple Mobility Simplicity forms the basis of why users embrace mobile technology – adoption of services is accelerated by ease of use. Simplicity brings with it convenience, and this in turns creates benefits for users. However these benefits can be compromised by unwanted complexity and security threats. The mobile industry should seek to minimise, or at least appease, such concerns going forward. In practice, a careful balance needs to be maintained. Whilst simple functionality is fundamental, if security is the source of complexity issues, it is often a necessary price to pay. Smartphone to Smart Services As the level of device sophistication starts to become commonplace, a transition from focusing on ‘device tech’ to service becomes more apparent. As a result, consumers will be increasingly influenced by service excellence over technology sophistication. This places pressure on the marketing and operational infrastructure of business selling and providing services via mobile – technology companies have to become more ‘service-centric’ and service businesses (banks, retailers, etc.) have to adapt to working in a complex mobile environment. As the landscape transforms, brands must understand their customers better in order to fully realise and capitalise on the customer relationship. By doing so, mobile providers and brands will be better placed to engage users and create higher value services in the future. Within the APAC market, both security and an easy to use interface are shown as key drivers to increased adoption of further mobile transaction. Assurances around personal information and Brands must understand their customers better in order to fully realise and capitalise on the customer relationship. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 23 / 25
  25. 25. The Mobile Consumer: Findings for Asia Pacific . Consumers will be increasingly influenced by service excellence over technology sophistication. © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 24 / 25
  26. 26. Appendix Research Methodology 3,288 interviews were conducted with adults aged 18+ who own a mobile phone (basic or smartphone) in APAC (China n=1000, India n=1050, Japan n=651, Australia n=587). Respondents completed an online survey in March/April 2013. Research conducted by Loudhouse, an independent research agency based in London. About Loudhouse As part of Octopus Group, Loudhouse is one of the UK’s leading performance and influencer marketing agencies, working with blue chip clients in technology, business services, finance and retail sectors. For more information, go to loudhouse.co.uk About SAP As the market leader in enterprise application software, SAP (NYSE: SAP) helps companies of all sizes and industries run better. From back office to boardroom, warehouse to storefront, desktop to mobile device, SAP empowers people and organisations to work together more efficiently and use business insight more effectively to stay ahead of the competition. SAP applications and services enable more than 195,000 customers to operate profitably, adapt continuously, and grow sustainably around the world. For more information, go to sap.com © 2013 SAP AG or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved.

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