ACHARA
CONSULTING,INC.
Developing a
Recovery-Oriented Community
Ijeoma Achara PsyD ●
• Describe the Major Drivers Leading
to the Focus on ROSC
• Discuss what we mean by
“Recovery”
• Review some of the Key El...
Personal recovery flourishes
best in a climate of family
health, cultural vitality,
community health, and
economic securit...
Recovery is not simply about personal health,
but the health and well being of the entire
community… “This isn’t about me....
– Unmet Need: < 10 % who need Tx. seek treatment or if they do,
arrive under coercive influences
– Low Pre-Treatment Initi...
• Unmet Need 2001: less than one half of adults with SMI receive
treatment (SAMHSA)
• Low Retention: a quarter of individu...
What is Recovery?
A process of change
through which
individuals improve
their health and
wellness, live a self
directed life, and strive
to ...
• Getting involved with things I enjoy ( e.g. church, friends, dating, support
groups, etc)
• Learning what I have to offe...
• My diagnosis is not a barrier
• Overcoming challenges
• Bouncing back stronger
• Ongoing change
• Having systems of supp...
WHAT HELPS TO PROMOTE RECOVERY?
What helped you get through
something difficult?
A meaningful
and fulfilling
life in my
Community
THE SHARED GOAL OF RECOVERY IN MENTAL
HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE CONDITIONS
G
PROCESSES of recovery, healing,
and
community inclusion
Condition of
Mental
Health
Condition of
Addiction
RECOVERY IS REAL!!!
THE GOOD NEWS
 Mutual support groups
 Other peer support
 Professional treatment
 Nontraditional methods
 Medical interventions
 F...
Treatment and Medication Support
Employment Opportunities
AA and NA
Family Education Faith-based Support
Physical Health R...
ROSC: Dispelling the Myths
ROSC is not:
• A Model
• Primarily focused on the integration of recovery support services
• De...
A ROSC is a Network of Professional and
Non professional services and supports
that allow people to find and follow their
...
• Prevent the development of behavioral
health conditions
• Intervene earlier in the progression of
illnesses
• Reduce the...
• Treatment Services aligned with a Recovery-oriented approach
• Integration of peer support services
• Mobilization of re...
What would treatment in a ROSC look like? How would it be different?
LETS EXPLORE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR
TREATMENT PROVIDERS...
ASSERTIVE OUTREACH, ENGAGEMENT
AND EARLY INTERVENTION
ASSERTIVE OUTREACH, ENGAGEMENT
AND EARLY INTERVENTION
“My clients don’t hit
bottom; they live on
the bottom. If we
wait fo...
• Pre-treatment Peer Support Groups
• Offer peer mentors as soon as contact is initiated
• For urban settings, develop a w...
What’s Going On?
•Global vs. categorical
assessment
•Continual assessments
•Assessing recovery capital
HOLISTIC SCREENING ...
• Can you tell me a bit about your hopes
or dreams for the future?
• What kind of dreams did you have before you
started h...
FINANCIAL
Advisors
Culturally Responsive
Services
• Awareness of differences in worldview
• Culturally competent assessment procedures
• Diverse staff at all levels of the ...
• Develop peer volunteer programs and peer leadership
associations
• Integrate paid recovery coaches/peer specialists
• Us...
Potential Functions of P-BRSS
• Assertive outreach
• Pre-treatment support and motivation enhancement
• Recovery capital a...
• Goals and strategies are
determined in partnership and are
directed by the person in recovery
• Services are person cent...
CONTINUING SUPPORT AND COMMUNITY
INTEGRATION in ADDICTION
Addiction/Chronic Illness
Compliance
Rate (%)
Relapse Rate
(%)
A...
Partial Recovery of Brain Dopamine Transporters
in Methamphetamine User After Abstinence
Normal Control METH User
(1 month...
Example from Philadelphia’s MH Recovery Transformation
• Day Program Transformation
• 8 Agencies with approximately 2000 p...
 Build competencies and confidence
 Facilitate the development of meaningful roles in the community
 Peers assist with ...
DECREASE IN CRISES UTILIZATION
36% decrease in Crisis
Utilization for those with at
least 1 year in program
Study included...
LOWER COST OF INPATIENT PSYCHIATRIC
SERVICES
• Recovery Community Organizations
• Home visits
• Peer Support groups
• Linkage to mutual aid societies
• Recovery check-...
• Tell your Story!!!! Use it to fight stigma and discrimination.
• Join an advocacy organization to stay informed e.g. Fac...
Advisors
40
THE RECOVERY COMMUNITY
FROM TOM HILL – FACES AND VOICES OF RECOVERY
Organized in state, regional and local
rec...
MH AND SUD ADVOCACY AND SERVICE
ORGANIZATIONS
FROM TOM HILL, FACES AND VOICES OF RECOVERY
41
Recovery
Community
Treatment
...
Advisors
42
RALLY FOR RECOVERY
Achara Consulting
Detroit Recovery Project: Andre Johnson
• Life Skills Workshops
• GED workshops
• Peer-led support groups
• Adult Educatio...
• Recognize that you and your community do have resources and strengths
• Look for opportunities to build relationships an...
Advisors
FINANCIAL
Advisors
“When the community starts getting
together around this process, other
good things start to happening, ...
FINANCIAL
Advisors
FINANCIAL
Advisors
“It gave addiction and
recovery a real voice.”
FINANCIAL
Advisors
FINANCIAL
Advisors
FINANCIAL
Advisors
“Oh my god, this is me
putting up a mural.”
Advisors
Achara Consulting, Inc
Philadelphia Department of
Behavioral Health and Intellectual
disAbilities
Achara Consulti...
Advisors
Achara Consulting, Inc
Philadelphia Department of
Behavioral Health and Intellectual
disAbilities
• Remember that there is hope for recovery and recovery is real.
• Provide support and hold hope for/with other families t...
CJ focus on intense initial period of tx does not often lead to long-term
recovery
Opportunities
• Increased Attraction: P...
• Continued monitoring AND support that integrates natural community
based supports
• Collaborative Opportunities: e.g. ho...
• Assertive Linkages
• Mobilization of natural
supports for early intervention
and continuing support
• Implications of a ...
• Stakeholders identified three priority areas:
–Peer Support
–Recovery-oriented Treatment
–Focus on Community Integration...
JOIN THE NATIONAL MOVEMENT
TOGETHER YOU CAN TRANSFORM YOUR COMMUNITY!!!
BREAK
FOCUS GROUP FEEDBACK AND GROUP
DISCUSSION
• Seven Sessions held between May 1 – June 21
• Locations Involved:
– San Antonio / Center for Healthcare Services
– San A...
FINANCIAL
Advisors
24%
6%
43%
27%
1. What do you think about when you hear "Recovery"? What
does it mean to you?
Process F...
Advisors
49%
24%
27%
2. If you consider the supports needed to help a person's
recovery journey, what resources and suppor...
Advisors
37%
36%
12%
15%
3. What kinds of services, or supports do you think would assist
people in getting fully integrat...
Advisors
15%
35%
50%
4. Are there things that providers or others might do that may
be well intentioned but may potentiall...
Advisors
7%
33%
29%
29%
2%
5. What would you say is most helpful to you - it could be
anything - even something that is no...
Advisors
40%
22%
8%
19%
11%
6. Are there any concerns or barriers that we should be
aware of as we move in this direction?...
Advisors
74%
26%
7. In what ways do you see yourself supporting the "ROSC"
movement in our community?
Advocacy Serving
Adv...
• What excites you about developing a ROSC in Texas and a recovery-oriented
community right here?
• What reactions did you...
LUNCH
TOPICS
1. Strategies to further integrate peer support services for adults
2. Strategies to increase the recovery supports...
BREAK
Panel of Recovery
Champions
THE PATH FORWARD
WHAT’S NEXT
Content developed by Ijeoma Achara
Achara Consulting, Inc.
Not to be duplicated without permission
ijeoma.achara@yahoo.com
AARI Planning Meeting
• 3rd Monday of every month
• Meets:
– 11:00 a.m.
– SACADA Office, 7500 Hwy 90 West, AT&T Building, ...
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Ijeoma achara 08162013_san antonio community rosc forum august 2013

  1. 1. ACHARA CONSULTING,INC. Developing a Recovery-Oriented Community Ijeoma Achara PsyD ●
  2. 2. • Describe the Major Drivers Leading to the Focus on ROSC • Discuss what we mean by “Recovery” • Review some of the Key Elements of a ROSC • Explore what one person, provider, and community can do to help people initiate and sustain their recovery OVERVIEW
  3. 3. Personal recovery flourishes best in a climate of family health, cultural vitality, community health, and economic security “The Community is the Treatment Center” Andy Chelsea, Shuswap tribal Chief at Alkali Lake Taken From Don Coyhis and William White THE HEALING FOREST
  4. 4. Recovery is not simply about personal health, but the health and well being of the entire community… “This isn’t about me. I’m doing this for my children and my community. I have to build up my community because I need to know that if something happens to me, there will be resources and people in the community who can step in and take care of my girls.” AMIR participant, New Haven CT THE NEED FOR A COMMUNITY APPROACH
  5. 5. – Unmet Need: < 10 % who need Tx. seek treatment or if they do, arrive under coercive influences – Low Pre-Treatment Initiation Rates – Low Retention: > 50 % do not successfully complete treatment – Inadequate Service Dose: significant % do not receive optimum dose of Tx. as recommended by NIDA. – Lack of Continuing Care: only 1 in 5 receive post-discharge planning – Recovery Outcomes: most resume using within 1 year and most do so within the first 90 days of discharge from Tx. – Revolving Door: > 60% one or more Tx. episodes, 24% 3 or more – 50% readmitted within 1 year. CHALLENGES CURRENTLY FACING PEOPLE IN ADDICTION SERVICE SYSTEMS
  6. 6. • Unmet Need 2001: less than one half of adults with SMI receive treatment (SAMHSA) • Low Retention: a quarter of individuals have contact with the public systems for 8 days or less (Bray et al., 2004) • High Retention: average length of stay in Day Programs for people with SMI is 15 – 20 years • High Recidivism: in higher levels of care, often leading to policies that limit access to care CHALLENGES FACING PEOPLE IN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEMS
  7. 7. What is Recovery?
  8. 8. A process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self directed life, and strive to reach their full potential. SAMSHA WHAT IS RECOVERY?
  9. 9. • Getting involved with things I enjoy ( e.g. church, friends, dating, support groups, etc) • Learning what I have to offer • Seeing myself as a person with strengths • Taking one day at a time • Knowing my illness is only a small part of who I am • Having a sense that my life can get better • Having dreams again • Believing I can manage my life and reach my goals (bravery and hope) • Being able to tackle everyday • Having people I can count on (Davidson et al,) Program for Recovery and Community Health - Yale University WHAT IS RECOVERY? NATIONAL FOCUS GROUPS
  10. 10. • My diagnosis is not a barrier • Overcoming challenges • Bouncing back stronger • Ongoing change • Having systems of support • Having a new way of living • Living a fulfilled life • Lifetime of growth • Being whole again • Abstinence • An awakening; healing of spirit, body, and mind WHAT IS RECOVERY? YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSPECTIVE
  11. 11. WHAT HELPS TO PROMOTE RECOVERY? What helped you get through something difficult?
  12. 12. A meaningful and fulfilling life in my Community THE SHARED GOAL OF RECOVERY IN MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE CONDITIONS
  13. 13. G PROCESSES of recovery, healing, and community inclusion Condition of Mental Health Condition of Addiction
  14. 14. RECOVERY IS REAL!!! THE GOOD NEWS
  15. 15.  Mutual support groups  Other peer support  Professional treatment  Nontraditional methods  Medical interventions  Family support  Faith  Having a sense of purpose and belonging  Meaningful employment  On your own  and many more THERE ARE MANY PATHS TO RECOVERY
  16. 16. Treatment and Medication Support Employment Opportunities AA and NA Family Education Faith-based Support Physical Health RCOs Healthy relationships Life skills training WHAT IS A RECOVERY-ORIENTED SYSTEM OF CARE (ROSC) ?
  17. 17. ROSC: Dispelling the Myths ROSC is not: • A Model • Primarily focused on the integration of recovery support services • Dependent on new dollars for development • A new initiative • A group of providers that increase their collaboration to improve coordination • An infusion of evidence-based practices • An organizational entity, group of people or committee • A closed network of services and supports ROSC is: • Value-driven APRROACH to structuring behavioral health systems and a network of clinical and non-clinical services and supports • Framework to guide systems transformation
  18. 18. A ROSC is a Network of Professional and Non professional services and supports that allow people to find and follow their own path to recovery No Two Journeys Look the Same IT BOILS DOWN TO THIS
  19. 19. • Prevent the development of behavioral health conditions • Intervene earlier in the progression of illnesses • Reduce the harm caused by behavioral health conditions • Help people transition from brief experiments in recovery initiation to recovery maintenance • Actively promote good quality of life, community health and wellness for all PRIMARY GOALS OF A ROSC
  20. 20. • Treatment Services aligned with a Recovery-oriented approach • Integration of peer support services • Mobilization of recovery advocacy community • Family support and education • Culturally competent services • Cross system collaboration (e.g. criminal justice system, child-welfare system, housing departments etc.) • Community based supports that promote recovery and wellness (e.g. faith community, local businesses, educational settings etc) What are the implications for different stakeholders? SOME OF THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF A ROSC
  21. 21. What would treatment in a ROSC look like? How would it be different? LETS EXPLORE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT PROVIDERS. WHAT CAN THEY DO?
  22. 22. ASSERTIVE OUTREACH, ENGAGEMENT AND EARLY INTERVENTION
  23. 23. ASSERTIVE OUTREACH, ENGAGEMENT AND EARLY INTERVENTION “My clients don’t hit bottom; they live on the bottom. If we wait for them to hit bottom, they will die. The obstacle to their engagement in treatment is not an absence of pain; it is an absence of hope”. Outreach Worker (Quoted in White, Woll, and Webber 2003)
  24. 24. • Pre-treatment Peer Support Groups • Offer peer mentors as soon as contact is initiated • For urban settings, develop a welcome/recovery support center • Build strong linkages between levels of care through peer-based • recovery support services • Use the most charismatic and engaging staff in reception areas • Connect with people before initial appointments via phone • Screening and early intervention in primary care, child care and school settings • Establish relationships with natural supports to promote early identification STRATEGIES TO PROMOTE ASSERTIVE OUTREACH AND ENGAGEMENT
  25. 25. What’s Going On? •Global vs. categorical assessment •Continual assessments •Assessing recovery capital HOLISTIC SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT SUBTITLE CONTENT PAGE WITH TEXT AND PHOTO
  26. 26. • Can you tell me a bit about your hopes or dreams for the future? • What kind of dreams did you have before you started having problems with alcohol or drug use, depression, etc.? • What are some things in your life that you hope you can do and change in the future? • If you went to bed and a miracle happened while you were sleeping, what would be different when you woke up? How would you know things were different? Leads to Recovery Plans vs. Treatment Plans CLINICAL ASSESSMENTS CHANGING OUR QUESTIONS: EXAMPLES
  27. 27. FINANCIAL Advisors Culturally Responsive Services
  28. 28. • Awareness of differences in worldview • Culturally competent assessment procedures • Diverse staff at all levels of the organization • Linguistic competence • Focus on empowerment with historically disenfranchised communities • Recognition of the increased importance of natural supports and family in collective cultures • Culture specific services STRATEGIES FOR CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE SERVICES
  29. 29. • Develop peer volunteer programs and peer leadership associations • Integrate paid recovery coaches/peer specialists • Use people with senior status to orient and serve as guides to those just entering a program Peers Integrated Into Service Teams THE SERVICE TEAM
  30. 30. Potential Functions of P-BRSS • Assertive outreach • Pre-treatment support and motivation enhancement • Recovery capital and needs assessment of individual/family/community • Recovery planning • Community resource identification • Assistance with basic needs • Volunteer recruitment • Assertive linkages to natural supports • Recovery focused skill training aimed at full community integration • Companionship, cultivating hope and modeling • Recovery check-ups (sustained monitoring and support) • Recovery advocacy for individual/family needs • Continued engagement • Real world skill building in the natural environment (stress management, etc) • Supporting multiple pathways to recovery • Problem solving obstacles
  31. 31. • Goals and strategies are determined in partnership and are directed by the person in recovery • Services are person centered and adapted to fit the needs and preferences of individuals. • Menu of services and supports which promotes choice and individualized tx. PARTNERSHIP-CONSULTANT RELATIONSHIPS INDIVIDUALIZED TREATMENT OPTIONS
  32. 32. CONTINUING SUPPORT AND COMMUNITY INTEGRATION in ADDICTION Addiction/Chronic Illness Compliance Rate (%) Relapse Rate (%) Alcohol 30-50 50 Opioid 30-50 40 Cocaine 30-50 45 Nicotine 30-50 70 Insulin Dependent Diabetes Medication <50 30-50 Diet and Foot Care <50 30-50 Hypertension Medication <30 50-60 Diet <30 50-60 Asthma Medication <30 60-80 Slide Acknowledgment: William White. Data Source: O’Brien CP, McLellan AT. Myths about the Treatment of Addiction (1996). The Lancet, Volume 347(8996), 237-240.
  33. 33. Partial Recovery of Brain Dopamine Transporters in Methamphetamine User After Abstinence Normal Control METH User (1 month detox) METH User (14 months detox) 0 3 ml/gm Source: Volkow, ND et al., Journal of Neuroscience 21, 9414-9418, 2001.
  34. 34. Example from Philadelphia’s MH Recovery Transformation • Day Program Transformation • 8 Agencies with approximately 2000 people in recovery enrolled since 2007 • Program Pillars »Peer Culture »Community Inclusion »Recovery Planning »Family Inclusion »Evidence Based Practices CONTINUING SUPPORT AND COMMUNITY INTEGRATION IN MENTAL HEALTH
  35. 35.  Build competencies and confidence  Facilitate the development of meaningful roles in the community  Peers assist with life skills development  Develop partnerships to build pathways of opportunity  Don’t re-create resources that exist in the community  Develop Recovery/Wellness Centers  Provide information and education about resources and opportunities in the community  Conduct interest assessments  Create partnerships with community stakeholders, organizations and businesses to enhance access and reduce barriers to integration STRATEGIES TO PROMOTE COMMUNITY HEALTH AND COMMUNITY INTEGRATION
  36. 36. DECREASE IN CRISES UTILIZATION 36% decrease in Crisis Utilization for those with at least 1 year in program Study included 611 consumers that had at least one year in Day
  37. 37. LOWER COST OF INPATIENT PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES
  38. 38. • Recovery Community Organizations • Home visits • Peer Support groups • Linkage to mutual aid societies • Recovery check-ups • Peer leadership councils • Recovery centers • Sober Houses • Clinic based individual and group • sessions • Mail • Internet-based RSS • Assertive Linkages to natural supports • Telephone-based RSS • Embedded within primary care settings APPROACHES TO CONTINUING SUPPORT MULTI-MEDIA (FACE TO FACE, TECHNOLOGY BASED, MAIL)
  39. 39. • Tell your Story!!!! Use it to fight stigma and discrimination. • Join an advocacy organization to stay informed e.g. Faces and Voices of Recovery, National Association for Mental Illness, Mental Health Association • Engage in training to become a recovery coach or mental health peer specialist • Reach out to the media • Support other people in early recovery • Join or start a recovery rally • Seek ways to give back to your community • Start or support a recovery community organization in your area WHAT CAN PEOPLE IN RECOVERY DO?
  40. 40. Advisors 40 THE RECOVERY COMMUNITY FROM TOM HILL – FACES AND VOICES OF RECOVERY Organized in state, regional and local recovery community organizations
  41. 41. MH AND SUD ADVOCACY AND SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS FROM TOM HILL, FACES AND VOICES OF RECOVERY 41 Recovery Community Treatment Community BRIDGE the gap!
  42. 42. Advisors 42 RALLY FOR RECOVERY
  43. 43. Achara Consulting
  44. 44. Detroit Recovery Project: Andre Johnson • Life Skills Workshops • GED workshops • Peer-led support groups • Adult Education and Employ-ability skills offered to individuals on probation • Strengthening Families Program • Health Education : nutrition, HIV/AIDS testing, education related to diabetes, physical fitness, high blood pressure • Partnership with health department to provide flu vaccines • C.O.P.E. (Co-Occurring Peer Empowerment Program) provides peer support to CJ population within jails and the community to assist with re-integration • W.I.R.E.D. (Women in Recovery Enhancement Program) is a 90 day recovery support service for pregnant women and women with children designed to address gender and cultural barriers to sustained recovery. EMERGING INNOVATIONS
  45. 45. • Recognize that you and your community do have resources and strengths • Look for opportunities to build relationships and partner • Share resources and information • Influence legislators • Combat stigma and discrimination • What skills, talents, information can you share? • Support the development of peer run organizations • Start an annual recovery walk Examples: • Small businesses • Faith-based recovery-ministries • Transportation support • Continue the dialogue • Mental health first aid trainings for first responders WHAT CAN COMMUNITY MEMBERS DO?
  46. 46. Advisors
  47. 47. FINANCIAL Advisors “When the community starts getting together around this process, other good things start to happening, too.”
  48. 48. FINANCIAL Advisors
  49. 49. FINANCIAL Advisors “It gave addiction and recovery a real voice.”
  50. 50. FINANCIAL Advisors
  51. 51. FINANCIAL Advisors
  52. 52. FINANCIAL Advisors “Oh my god, this is me putting up a mural.”
  53. 53. Advisors Achara Consulting, Inc Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbilities Achara Consulting
  54. 54. Advisors Achara Consulting, Inc Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbilities
  55. 55. • Remember that there is hope for recovery and recovery is real. • Provide support and hold hope for/with other families that are going through a tough time • Share your story! • Get involved with advocacy • Volunteer at peer and family run organizations and treatment facilities to provide support to family members • Help to identify local community resources that can help others initiate and sustain their recovery and help to build a network of allies • Address NIMBY barriers to community integration WHAT CAN FAMILY MEMBERS DO?
  56. 56. CJ focus on intense initial period of tx does not often lead to long-term recovery Opportunities • Increased Attraction: People typically referred after very long addiction careers. ROSC = early intervention First offenders programs, Early diversion programs • Increased Access: finite capacity of the tx system leads to long waiting lists. CJ has an opportunity to expand the use of and develop recovery natural supports. • Increased Engagement • Reduced Recidivism – 730,000 people admitted and released from prisons each yr – Two-thirds (68%) rearrested within 3 years of release (1997) – Half (52%) returned to prison for new crime/ violation (1997) IMPLICATIONS FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJ) SYSTEMS AND POPULATIONS
  57. 57. • Continued monitoring AND support that integrates natural community based supports • Collaborative Opportunities: e.g. holistic assessments can identify prevention and early intervention opportunities for siblings and children. • Recovery Capital Assessments • Relevance of Recovery Planning • Effectiveness of peer-support to assist with transitioning between cultures and sustaining recovery • Empowerment, Hope and Choice • Rebuilding lives within the context of communities IMPLICATIONS FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS AND POPULATIONS
  58. 58. • Assertive Linkages • Mobilization of natural supports for early intervention and continuing support • Implications of a chronic care approach to treatment • Relevance of recovery planning IMPLICATIONS FOR CHILD WELFARE SERVICES
  59. 59. • Stakeholders identified three priority areas: –Peer Support –Recovery-oriented Treatment –Focus on Community Integration & Engagement WHAT’S NEXT FOR TEXAS?
  60. 60. JOIN THE NATIONAL MOVEMENT TOGETHER YOU CAN TRANSFORM YOUR COMMUNITY!!!
  61. 61. BREAK
  62. 62. FOCUS GROUP FEEDBACK AND GROUP DISCUSSION
  63. 63. • Seven Sessions held between May 1 – June 21 • Locations Involved: – San Antonio / Center for Healthcare Services – San Antonio / Family Services Association – San Antonio / SACADA – San Antonio / Haven for Hope – Victoria – Kerrville – Eagle Pass • Total number of participants: 114 ROSC SURVEY MEETINGS
  64. 64. FINANCIAL Advisors 24% 6% 43% 27% 1. What do you think about when you hear "Recovery"? What does it mean to you? Process Free from Drugs and Alcohol Change and Healing Holistic Free from Drugs and Alcohol • Diagnosis not in the way • Diagnosis is not a barrier • Abstinence • To be away from drugs Change and Healing • Overcoming challenges • Difficult transitions • Ongoing change • Bouncing back stronger Process • Systems of support • On-going • Lifestyle change • New way of living Holistic • Living a fulfilled life • Lifetime of growth • Be whole again
  65. 65. Advisors 49% 24% 27% 2. If you consider the supports needed to help a person's recovery journey, what resources and supports do they need? Recovery Capital Family Support Other Resources Family Support • Supportive friends and families • Telling people its ok to ask for help • Family counseling • Family education Recovery Capital • Health Insurance • Counseling • AA/other support groups/churches • Mentoring Other Resources • Education and knowledge for the medical community • More community outreach at different public events • Financial counseling • Basic needs are met
  66. 66. Advisors 37% 36% 12% 15% 3. What kinds of services, or supports do you think would assist people in getting fully integrated into their communities? Basic Needs/Services Sober Community Activities/Resources Recovery Coach/Mentoring Advocacy Community/Self Basic Needs/Services • Affordable housing • Job assistance training • Childcare • GED/education and Recovery Coach/Mentoring • Mentoring • Recovery support coaches available • Case managers • Guidance/career counseling Sober Community Activities/Resources • Schools like PDAP • Youth oriented detox • Gym facilities/ and other positive activities • Networking Community/Self Advocacy • Self-educate • Self-advocate • Media/social media • Stigma free environments
  67. 67. Advisors 15% 35% 50% 4. Are there things that providers or others might do that may be well intentioned but may potentially hinder the recovery process? External Perceptions Improved Medical Therapy/Support Internal/External Perceptions • Judgmental - stereotyping • Negative feedback, criticism • legal issues and legal system • mental illness –lack of understanding Improved Medical Resources • Doctors that listen to patient and family • Sterile questionnaire - no care • lack of education of non-recovery providers • no placement options Therapy/Support • Peer pressure • Detention • Providers work in silos • Cookie cutter programs
  68. 68. Advisors 7% 33% 29% 29% 2% 5. What would you say is most helpful to you - it could be anything - even something that is not currently available. Housing Community Programs Treatment Public Perception/Dialog Milestones Treatment • Life Skills /coping • Case management • Easy access to treatment; no waiting lists Housing • Housing/ and independent living with help • Money management classes • Employment opportunities Community Programs • Sober activities • Churches Milestones • Accountability • Acknowledgment • Celebrating milestone Public Perception/Dialog • More advocacy from those with influence • Reframing the dialog • Removing bias from community • More education
  69. 69. Advisors 40% 22% 8% 19% 11% 6. Are there any concerns or barriers that we should be aware of as we move in this direction? Communication Understanding Acknowledgement Limited Resources Access to Services Communication • with community and providers • Confidentiality of treatment Understanding • Be given a chance • Remember and include the voice of youth • Cultural sensitive material Acknowledgement • Knowledge of mental illness • Public awareness • Stigma Limited Resources • Funding insurance • Dual diagnosis funding Access to Services • Accessibility • Limited providers • Funding • Sharing information
  70. 70. Advisors 74% 26% 7. In what ways do you see yourself supporting the "ROSC" movement in our community? Advocacy Serving Advocacy • Awareness campaign through the arts • Reach out to Juvenile Justice • Advocating for recovery • Community campaigns Serving • Education • Mentoring • Giving back • Getting more ROSC info to the community
  71. 71. • What excites you about developing a ROSC in Texas and a recovery-oriented community right here? • What reactions did you have to the focus group responses? Did anything really resonate with you or surprise you? • Was there anything that you thought was missing? • What are some things that we’ve discussed that are already happening in your community? What are you most proud of? What is going well? • What are your concerns related to developing a ROSC? What might hold you back? • Was your thinking challenged or changed in any way? • What new insights or ideas have been generated for you? LARGE GROUP DISCUSSION
  72. 72. LUNCH
  73. 73. TOPICS 1. Strategies to further integrate peer support services for adults 2. Strategies to increase the recovery supports available to youth 3. Strategies to strengthen community supports available to people with substance use and mental health conditions 4. Strategies for addressing stigma and increasing community awareness 5. Strategies for increasing supports available to those in the criminal justice system 6. Opportunities to increase the alignment of treatment with a recovery orientation. What are some quick changes that can be made. How to engage providers in this process 7. Improving Collaboration and integration between the mental health and substance use disorder communities 8. Increasing supports to family members CAFE CONVERSATIONS
  74. 74. BREAK
  75. 75. Panel of Recovery Champions
  76. 76. THE PATH FORWARD WHAT’S NEXT
  77. 77. Content developed by Ijeoma Achara Achara Consulting, Inc. Not to be duplicated without permission ijeoma.achara@yahoo.com
  78. 78. AARI Planning Meeting • 3rd Monday of every month • Meets: – 11:00 a.m. – SACADA Office, 7500 Hwy 90 West, AT&T Building, Ste. 100 • Contacts: – mlane@sacada.org – ckeebaugh@midcoastfamily.org • Upcoming dates: – September 16 – October 21 – November 18
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