ASTD South Africa- State 2012 report - Marius Meyer

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ASTD South Africa- State 2012 report - Marius Meyer

  1. 1. 9th Annual State of the South African L&D Industry Report 2012 Marius Meyer & Guy Blackbeard 7 March 2013 @SABPP1
  2. 2. Thanks to our Researcher Penny Abbott, Head of HR Research Initiative of SABPP
  3. 3. South African challenges 1. World competitiveness ratings 2. Unemployment 3. Arab Spring
  4. 4. World Competitiveness Rating- IMD Countries B 2011 44 2012 46 -2 R I C S 49 32 19 54 48 35 23 50 +1 -3 -4 +4 329 CRITERIA Top 3 – 1. Hong Kong 2. U.S.A 3. Switzerland
  5. 5. How we’ll fix SA National Development Plan Vision - 58million people in 2030 - an economy 3 times larger - unemployment reduced to 6% - nobody living below the national poverty line - inequality significantly reduced. Endorsed - by all political parties represented in parliament - by cabinet - private sector - civil society. Action - economic growth of at least 5% per annum over the next 18 years - existing businesses double in size over the next 18 years - new legislation to encourage entrepreneurs(lower costs at doing business) - growth in infrastructure - electricity & water availability and at reduced rates - raise the quality of education and training - affordable health care for all.
  6. 6. Top 10 HR priorities 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Creating a high performance culture / climate Leadership and management development Skills development Focus on corporate values, ethics Industrial/employee relations HR Survey 2011 Customer service Employee engagement Change Management Crafting and implementing HR strategy HR policies and procedures
  7. 7. Top 10 training programmes 1. Employee induction 2. Customer service 3. Leadership/Management 4. Safety 5. Product Knowledge 6. Performance management 7. New Equipment Orientation 8. Learnerships 9. Strategic Planning 10. Process/Quality Improvement
  8. 8. SCARCE AND CRITICAL SKILLS Pos. Type of scarce and critical skills area Magnitude of scarcity 1 Industrial & Mechanical Engineers and Technologists 2 Medical Technicians 3 Training & development professionals 4 Metal fitters & machinists 5 Specialist managers 6 Agriculture & forestry scientists 7 Chemistry, food & beverage technicians 8 Electrical Engineering, draft persons & technicians 9 Social workers 9 Medical and laboratory scientists & technologists 10 Motor mechanics 11 Structural steel & welding trade workers 11 Advertising, marketing & sales managers 12 Civil engineering, draft persons & technicians 13 HR Professionals 14 Advertising, marketing & sales professionals 15 Production & operations managers 12 665 10 000 9 260 8 340 6 955 6 175 6 145 5 145 5 000 5 000 4 205 4 045 4 045 3 960 3 855 3 095 3 130 (DHET, 2011)
  9. 9. A.S.T.D Workplace Learning and Performance Competency Model and Certification
  10. 10. New ASTD Competency Model
  11. 11. Purpose of the Research Information about state of the HRD trends and benchmarks Benchmark internal practices with international companies Benchmark internal practices with other companies Provide guidelines to improve HRD practices
  12. 12. Methodology • Questionnaires electronically distributed to L&D managers. • Data analysis of results. • Comparison with 2003-2011 studies and international benchmarks where possible.
  13. 13. Highlights over last 9 years • Good track record: 2003 – 2012 • International and local credibility (ASTD) • Triple publication model – report, articles, books + conference papers • Strong academic support – Unisa, NMMU, NWU, UJ, VUT • Annual trends & benchmarks – good multiyear data for comparisons (facts vs fads)
  14. 14. Respondents Years of experience in L&D Highest qualifications
  15. 15. Sample 16 of the 21 SETA’s covered TETA 7% SASSETA 2% PSETA 2% Agriseta 5% Bank SETA 9% SERVICES SETA 7% CETA 7% MQA 7% CHIETA 5% Energy & Water SETA 5% MICT SETA 7% ETDP 14% MERSETA 12% INSETA 2% HWSETA 2% FOOD BEV SETA 5% FASSET 2%
  16. 16. Size of companies 10000 and over 15% Less than 100 14% 5000 - 9999 4% 2000 - 4999 15% 1000 - 1999 10% 100 - 999 42%
  17. 17. Provincial breakdown Gauteng WC EC NC FS L M 0% 5% 7% 2% 3% 0% 0% 83% NW
  18. 18. Training spend increasing 4.5 4 3.5 3.94 3.6 3.43 3.13 3 3.11 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
  19. 19. International benchmarks
  20. 20. Use of HRIS 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 2007 2008 30 2009 20 2010 10 0 2011
  21. 21. Comfort zone challenged
  22. 22. Knowledge management (Managing organisational knowledge) • 75% of respondents would like to be better trained in knowledge management and learning organisation concepts • Formal knowledge management initiatives only exist in about half the organisations, and that • Around 30% of organisations use their HRIS for knowledge management functions
  23. 23. Training needs analysis methods (Improving human performance) 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Questionnaires Focus Groups Performance Management Data 2007 2008 Interviews 2009 2010 2011 Customer Complaints Other
  24. 24. Correlation between popularity and importance = 0.678 Employee Induction 85.7 Computer/IT skills 83.7 Leadership/Management 81.6 Product Knowledge 75.5 Safety 75.5 Learnerships 71.4 Financial Skills 69.3 AIDS Awareness 65.3 Performance Management 63.3 Project Management 63.3 Strategic Planning 61.2 Wellness 61.2 New Equipment Operation 49.0 Professional Development 49.0 Team Building 49.0 ABET 46.9 Sexual Harassment 44.9 Teamwork 44.9 Diversity 42.9 Outplacement/Retirement 40.8 Basic Life/Work Skills 30.6 Creativity 26.5 Self-Directed Learning Skills 26.5 Foreign/Other Languages 18.4 Training importance 2010 Product Knowledge Process/Quality Improvement New Equipment Operation Employee Induction Safety Customer Service Leadership/Management Performance Management Ethics Recruitment and Selection 4.2 3.9 4 4.5 4.2 4.3 4.2 4.1 3.8 3.9 2011 2011 Rank % of respondents who provide these programmes 2011 2010 Rank Training programmes provided 5 10 7 1 4 2 3 6 1 1 1 4 4 6 7 7 7 10 4.6 4.6 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.2 Change in ranking
  25. 25. More outsourcing of training Delivered internally 53 47 2007 54 46 2008 53 47 2009 Delivered externally 52 48 2010 62 39 2011
  26. 26. Training delivery methods 70 60 50 43% of organisations use e-learning 40 2007 2008 2009 30 2010 2011 20 10 0 Classroom Text based Video based E-learning CD-Rom Satellite Webinars Blended learning
  27. 27. E-learning content 90 80 70 60 2007 50 2008 2009 40 2010 2011 30 20 10 0 IT Soft skills Technical skills Industry specific Managerial Languages Other
  28. 28. We are changing with technology
  29. 29. The Evaluation of Training
  30. 30. Jack Phillips – Evaluation Levels Level Measurement Focus 1. Reaction & Planned Action Measures participant satisfaction with the programme and captures planned actions 2. Learning Measures changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes 3. Application Measures changes in on-the-job behavior 4. Business Impact Measures changes in business impact variables 5. Return on Investment Compare programme benefits to the costs
  31. 31. Evaluation 57 51 44 39 39
  32. 32. Characteristics of Evaluation Levels Chain of Impact Value of Information Customer Focus Frequency of Use Difficulty of Assessment Reaction Lowest Consumer (Learner) Frequent Easy Highest Client (Sponsor) Infrequent Difficult Learning Application Impact ROI
  33. 33. Use of Evaluation at Each Level Sugrue & Rivera Level 1, Reaction 91.3% Level 2, Learning 53.9% Level 3, Application 22.9% Level 4, Impact 7.6% Level 5, ROI 2.1%
  34. 34. Evaluation Targets Levels Target USA Target SA Level 1 – Reaction 100% 100% Level 2 – Learning 50% 100% Level 3 – Job Application 30% 100% Level 4 – Business Results 20% 20% Level 5 – ROI 10% 10%
  35. 35. Evaluation Levels outcomes Usefulness Levels Effectiveness rating 1. Reaction & Planned Action 20% 20% 2. Learning 20% 40% 3. Application 20% 60% 4. Business impact 20% 80% 5. Return on Investment 20% 100%
  36. 36. Training evaluation - use of ROI We do pre- and post-assessments of training programmes to enable us to calculate the ROI We calculate ALL the inputs costs of training programmes Our Training Reports to management include ROI figures 2011 We use ROI data when compiling training budgets for the following year 2010 2009 We calculate the financial value ROI for training programmes ourselves 2008 2007 Our training staff have formal training in ROI processes We ask Training Providers to supply us with ROI data or information on their training programmes We use specific software to assist in the ROI process 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
  37. 37. L&D Trends (Managing the training function)
  38. 38. Talent Management • 60% of organisations have a formal talent management strategy • Less than half of these (46%) rate their strategy as effective
  39. 39. Purpose of coaching 45% of organisations use coaching to support TM strategy Individual transformation (identity, meaning, career etc.) 18% Behavioural change 17% Skills transfer (task related, technical skills) 40% Performance improvement 25%
  40. 40. Basis for mentoring Knowledge management model 7% Organisation culture needs 11% Performance management processes 15% Skills audits 11% Personal development plans 16% Leadership competency model 11% Strategic skills development needs 16% Business strategic needs 13%
  41. 41. Key findings 1. Average training spend 3.94% of payroll on training (3.11% in 2010 and 3.6% in 2009). 2. Over 95% of organisations have a computerised human resource information system (HRIS) in place and use it for a variety of functions. (91% in 2009) 3. Training needs analyses are conducted using mainly performance management data (68.9%), data from customer complaints (57.8%) and interviews (40%). 4. The use of questionnaires for training needs analysis has dropped considerably from 78% to 46.7%. 5. Outsourcing of training design and delivery continues to increase – 64% of training is designed externally on average and 62% is delivery externally on average. 6. Classroom learning continues to be the most popular training delivery method (59%) with e-learning second at 20%.
  42. 42. Key findings (continued) 7. 45% of organisations evaluate at least some of their training using financial ROI. (39% last year and 40% the year before). Most organisations (70%) use between 2 and 4 of the Kirkpatrick levels in evaluating training. 8. 60% of organisations have adopted a formal talent management strategy. This is also an increasing trend (53% last year and 49% the year before). These strategies are rated Effective or Highly Effective by 46% of organisations (51% last year). 9. 45% of organisation use coaching in support of their talent management strategy. The same percentage use mentoring and 90% of those organisations use both coaching and mentoring. Coaching seems to be regarded as more effective than mentoring. Coaching is most often delivered by line managers, while the use of external coaches is still not prevalent (13 – 15%).
  43. 43. Opportunities • Redesigned questionnaire • A stronger model of collaboration + independence (ASTD/SABPP/NWU) • Linking the study to a professional qualification (NWU) • Broaden scope – SETA involvement • Bridging the research-practice gap • Multiple studies on trends (Masters and PhD) • Supplementing the results with case studies (CIPD model) • Awards for best practices (ASTD/SABPP) • Marketing, publicity, impact – NSDS III
  44. 44. A new tripartite relationship
  45. 45. Future opportunities for delegates 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Participant – complete the questionnaire Champion – join the design team Social partner – retweet the results Sponsor – add your brand to the study Researcher – do post graduate study Implementer – contextualise and apply at your company Connect with us – hrri@sabpp.co.za (Dr Penny Abbott)
  46. 46. Conclusion We have made some progress on L&D benchmarks in South Africa, but perhaps we need some more focused work in elevating the status and impact of learning. L&D in South Africa compares well with international norms. Contact us on hrri@sabpp.co.za to participate in 2013 study. Visit SABPP or ASTD exhibitions for 2012 report.

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