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Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842
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Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842

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Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842

Anti-Slavery Almanac of 1842

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  • 1. fts < srs"7^ .«8y^
  • 2. Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2011 with funding from Associates of the Boston Public Library / The Boston Foundation http://www.archive.org/details/americanantislav1842chil
  • 3. —VOL. II.—NO. 1.— THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY 4 11MAI.1C, FOR 184 2. CALCULATED FOR THE HORIZON AND MERIDIAN OF BOSTON, NEW YORK, BALTIMO^:, AND CHARLESTON: AND FOR USE IN ."' -^tERT PA*RT OF THE COUNTRY. • NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY S. W. BENEDICT, 12S. FULTON STREET. Price $23 00 per 1000 ; $3 00 per hundred,
  • 4. /TPC es , 5579 (iZfS) AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. %* For the calculations of this Almanac we are indebted to the Christian Alma- nae for 1842. Note.—Use the Calendar under the State in which you reside, and the corres- ponding column of Moon's Phases at the top of the page, and no calendar can be more simple or convenient. Eclipses in 1842. I. Three Eclipses of the Sun—At the time of New Moon, in January, July, and December, all invisible in the United States. (1.) Jan. 11, annular at the south pole ; visible in South Africa ; central and annular in long. W. from Greenwich, 57° 28' ; S. lat. 88° 41'. (2.) July 8, will be central and total E. long. 77° 27', N. lat. 51° 47', and pass central and total through Europe and Asia. At London, 9.61 digits eclipsed on sun's south limb. (3.) Dec. 31, visible throughout South America and New Zealand ; centrai and annular, W. long. 104° 21', S. lat. 33° 18'. II. Two Eclipses of the Moon.—(1.) Jan. 26, at the time of Full Moon, in- visible in America ; visible in nearly the whole Eastern hemisphere. (2.) Eclipse of the Moon on Friday, July 22, morning ; invisible at Boston and New- York, but visible as follows : PLACES. Beginning. Middle. Moon Sets. Duration of visibility. Digits Ecl'd at setting. H. M. h. m. H. M. H. M Detroit, 4 14 ... 4 44 30 2.38 Philadelphia, 4 44 ... 4 49 05 0.45 Baltimore, 4 38 ... 4 51 13 1.08 Pittsburgh. 4 25 . . . 4 49 24 1.97 Charleston, 4 25 ... 5 08 43 2.96 Cincinnati, 4 07 . . . 4 53 46 3.06 Nashville, 3 58 5 01 5 01 1 03 3.45 Mobile, 3 51 4 54 5 14 1 23 3.08 St. Louis, 3 45 4 48 4 55 1 10 3.35 New Orleans, 3 44 4 47 5 16 1 32 2.67 Natchez, 3 39 4 42 5 12 1 33 2.62 Magnitude of the Eclip se at the middle, 3.456 digit s on the southern limb. fpf The Calendar page in this Almanac is adapted for nse in every part of the United States. It is based on the fact, that, in the same Latitude, that is, onaline running due East and West, the Sun and Moon rise and set at the same viomentby the clock or Almanac, not only throughout the United States, but around the world — the variations being so small as to be of no importance for ordinary purposes. Thus, if on any day the sun rises at Boston at five minutes past six, it rises at five minutes past six on the same line of latitude westward throughout the States of Massachu- setts, New-York, and Michigan, and so on to the Pacific Ocean. Hence, a Calendar adapted to Boston for New-England, is equally adapted, as to the rising and setting of the sun and moon, for use in Northern New- York and Michigan. A Calendar for New-York city is adapted for use in the States of Penn- sylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. A Calendar for Baltimore is adapted for Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri. And a Calendar for Charleston will answer for North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana. Wherever, then, the reader may reside, by looking for the State at the top of the Calendar page, he will find underneath the rising and setting of the sun and moon sufficiently accurate for all practical purposes. The changes, fulls, and quarters of the Moon, however, are governed by another principle, and are essentially the same for all places on the same Longitude, u is, on any line extending due north and south. Thus, the moon's phases for Charles- j- ton suit Pittsburgh, &c. Any phasis takes place at the same instant of absolute I
  • 5. AMERICAN AN-T1 SLAVERY ALMANAC. time ; but the local time is earlier at the westward, and later at the eastward, at the rate of/our minutes for ea,ch degree of Longitude; or at the rate of one minute for every 12 miles 273 rods in the latitude ol Boston ; 13 miles 60 rods in the lati- tude of New-York city ; 13 miles 143 rods in the latitude of Baltimore j and 14 miles 199 rods in the latitude of Charleston. The Sun's declination, as masters of coasting vessels will observe, is adapted in this calendar to the meridian of New-York city. The declination varies most rapidly about the time of the equinoxes ; but even then, it changes but 1' while the sun is passing from the meridian of New-York to that of New-Orleans or St. Louis. The column of sun's declination is therefore designed, like the days of the week and month, for general use throughout the country. Clock Time. This Almanac shows the rising and setting of the Sun, &c. according to a clock that keeps accurate time throughout the year. As the Sun is sometimes fast or slow of clock, the forenoon will of course be, by clock, so much longer or shorter than the afternoon. Some observing this, think they have found an error in the Almanac ; but it is no error. The table, " Sun on the Meridian," at the head of the Calendar pages, shows at what moment the Sun, according to a true clock, is on the meridian, or strikes an accurate noon-mark. The London Nautical Alma- nac, and a large portion of the Almanacs in our country, are now adapted to true, or clock time. Chronological Cycles. Solar Cycle, 3Dominical Letter, B. Golden Number, or Lunar Cycle, 19. Epact, 18. © O Sun, © D Moon, Roman Indiction, 15. Julian Period, 6555. Characters. 6 Mercury, 2 Venus, © Earth, T Aries, the Ram, the Head « Taurus, the Bull, the Neck. II Gemini, the Twins, the Arms. 52 Cancer, the Crab, the Breast. SI Leo, the Lion, the Heart. ITB Virgo, the Virgin, the Bowels ^ Saturn, Rjl Herschell. Signs of the Zodiac. £i Libra, the Balance, the Reins, fll Scorpio, the Scorpion, the Secrets. t Sagittarius, the Archer, the Thighs. V5 Capricoruus, the Gout, the Knees. Z? Aquarius, the Butler, the Legs. X Pisces, die Fishes, the Feet. i Mars, Aspects and Nodes. 6 Conjunction, or in the same longitude. ^ Sextile, or 60 degrees distant. Quartile, or 90 degrees distant. A Trine, or 120 degrees distant. Vc. Quincunx, or 150 degrees -listant. 8 Opposition, or 180 degrees distant Q Ascending Node. U Descending Node. Phenomena of the Planets, Aspects, &c. Morning and Evening Stars.—Venus ( 9 ) will be Morning Star until March 5, then Evening Star until December 18, then Morning Star until October 2, 1843. Jupiter ( 4 ) will be Morning Star until July 10, then Evening Star until Jan. 25, 1843. 10, 8 © U ; 19, 5 stat. ; 23, O ent, SI ; 29,Jan. 17—Super. 6 © 3 ; 20, © enters £?. Feb. 15—5 's gr. elong.; 18, © ent. X ; 21, S stat. March 3—Inferior 6 © 8 ; 5, Super, 6 © 9 ; 15, <5 ©$[ ; 15, S stat. ; 20, © ent, T ; 30, 2 's gr. elong. April 4— © > ; 11, D © 4 ; 20, © ent. « ; 23, > Slat. May 10—Super. 6 © 9 ; 10, 4 stat. ; 21, © Xne 11, S's elong.; 19, © I#; 21, © ent. E£ ; 24, S stat. ; 25 6 © & . July 3—J£ stat. ; 3, 8 © ^> ; 8, Inf. 6 © S ; 5 's gr. elong Aug. 23—0 ent. M ; 23, Sup. 6 5. Sept. 9—4 stat. ; 11, ^ stat. ; 19, 8 © BJ ; 23, © ent. £L Oct. 1—Q © > ; 8, 9 's gr. elong. ; 3, S 's great, elong. ; 20, S stat. ,- 23, ent. V ; 31, Inf. 6 0S. Nov. 9— S stat. ; 16, 8 's gr. elong. ; 22, G ent. t; 28, 9 stat. Dec. 4—1£ stat. ; 16, Bjl ; 18, Inferior © 9 ; 21, © ent. V5 ; 28, Sup. £ 8 .
  • 6. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. Tide Table. {Chiefly from the Table in Boicditch's Navigator.) The Calendar pages exhibit the time of high water at New-York, Elizabethtown Point, and New-London. To find the time of high water at any of the following places, add to or subtract from the time of high water at New- York, as follows : (A signifies that the annexed quantity of time is to be added, S subtracted) —for Amelia Harbor, Ann, Cape, Annapolis, Anticosti Island, west end, St. Augustine, Block Island, Boston, Canso, Cape, Charles, Cape, Charleston Bar, Cod, Cape, Delaware Riv. ent. Fairfield, Fear, Cape, Florida Keys, Gay Head, George's River, H.M 24 2 36 2 06 5 24 1 24 H.M.J H.M. Georgetown Bar, S 1 54 Norwich Landing, A 45 Gouldsborough, A 2 06 Passamaquoddy R. A 2 36 Guildford, ~ A 1 30 Penobscot River, Halifax, N.S. S 1 24 Philadelphia, Hartford, S 5 40 Plymouth, Hatteras, Cape, A 06 Portland, S 09 Port Royal Island, S 1 14 Portsmouth, S 2 54 Quebec, Canada, A 1 54 Rhode Island, A 06 Roman, Cape, A 2 06 Sable, Cape, A 2 30 Salem, S 09 Sandy Hook, N. J., A 2 06 Saybrook, S 1 17 St. Simon's Bar, A 2 21 Sunbury, A 1 22,Townsend, S 1 17 Henlopen, Cape, A 2 36, Henry, Cape, S 24 St. John's, N.F., S 1 09 Kennebec, S 1 39 Lookout, Cape, A 2 36 Machias, A 06 Marblehead, A 2 00 May, Cape, S 54 Mount Desert, S 04 New Bedford, S 1 17Newburyport, A 1 51 New-Haven, A . 51 A 5 00 A 2 36 A 1 51 S 39 A 2 21 S 05 S 2 09 S 9 54 S 54 A 2 36 S 2 17 A 15 S 1 24 A 36 A 1 51 Festivals and Jan. 1 , Circumcision ; 2, 2d S. aft. Christ- mas ; 6, Epiph. ; 9, 1st S after Epiph ; 16, 2d S after Epiph ; 23, Septuages ; 25, Conv of St Paul ; 30, Sexagesima. Feb 6, Quinquages ; 9, Ash Wed ; 13, 1st S in Lent ; 20, 2d S in Lent ; 27, 3d S in L. March 6, 4th S in Lent ; 13. 5th S in L ; 20, S before Easter, 25, Good Friday ; 27, Easter. April 3, 1st S aft. Easter ; 10, 2d S. aft. E. ; 17, 3d S aP. E ; 24, 4th S after E. May 1, 5th S aft. E., and Sts. Philip and James ; 5, Ascension ; 8, S aft Ascen ; 15, Whit S , 22, Trinity ; 29, 1st S aft Trim June 5, 2d S aft Trin ; 11, St Barnabas ; 12, 3d S aft Trin ; 19, 4th S aft T; 24, John Bap. ; 26, 5th S aft Trinity ; 29, St Peter. July 3, 6th S after Trin ; 10, 7th S after Fasts in 1843. Trin ; 17, 8th S after Trin ; 24, 9th S after Trin; 31, 10th Sunday after Trinity. Aug 7, 11th S aft Trin ; 14, 12th S after Trin ; 21 , 13th S aft Trin ; 24, St Barthol ; 28, 14th Sunday after Trinity. Sept 4, 15th S aft Trin ; 11, 16th S after Trin ; 18, 17th S after Trin ; 21, St Matt ; 25, 18th Sunday after Trinity. Oct 2, 19th S after Trin ; 9, 20th S after Trin ; 16, 21 st S after Trin ; IS, St Luke ; 23, 22d S after Trin ; 28, Sts. Simon and Jude 5 30, 23d S aft Trinity. 1 Nov 1, All Saints ; 6, 24th S after Trin ; i 13, 25th S aft Trin ; 20, 26th S aft Trin ; 27, Advent ; 30, St. Andrew. | Dec. 4, 2d S in Ad; 11, 3d S in Ad; 18, 4th S in Ad ; 21, St Thorn ; 25, Christmas j 26, St Steph ; 27, St John ; 28, Innocents. Effects of Drinking. Wine and other physical exhilerants, during the treacherous truce to wretched- edness which they afford, dilapidate the structure, and undermine the very founda- tion of happiness. No man, perhaps, was ever completely miserable, until af'er he had fled to alcohol for consolation. The habit of vinous indulgence is not nore pernicious than it is obstinate and pertinacious in its hold, when it has once fastened itself upon the constitution. It is not to be conquered by half-way measures. The victory over it, in order to be permanent, must be perfect. As long as there lurks a relic of it in the frame, there is imminent danger of a relapse of this moral malady, from which there seldom is, as from plvysical disorders, a gradual convalescence. The cure, if at all, must be effected at once ; cutting and pruning will do no good.
  • 7. First Month. JANUARY, 1842. 31 d; MOON'S PHASES. D. Third Quarter, 3 New Moon, 11 First Quarter, 19 Full Moon, 26 Boston. H. M. 5 24 ev. 11 31 mo. 4 16 ev. 1 6ev. New-York. H. M. 5 12 «>. 11 19 mo. 4 4 ev. 54 cr. Baltimore. Charleston. H. M. 4 48 eu. 10 55 mo. 3 40 ev. 30 ev. apa «<S 1 9 17 25 Sub on Merl. H> Jf. 5 2et>. 11 9 mo. 3 54 ev. 44 ev. H . BI . S . ev. 3 57 7 31 10 30 12 43 to sa^^^^^sw^^H^Hga^H^HgaS^H^Hgw*" > W » W (O W (O (O M W h3 W— — tOtOlOtOtOtOtOtOCO > *». Ox mMWW) 00 -1 OS *» 63 O -J | Day of month. | Day of weeK. ~3 -4 ~3 OC 00 wojoiw to CO 00 CO tt^Ox- Sun's declen- sion South. ^j^i<i^j<i^j-a^i^i^^i<j<i -j -j ^» -j -j -j ~j wwwCO CD CO ^j^^^^^kj^kj^j^U — Ox Ox Ox Ox Q — CO CX>3 QX M» O COCOCTl ^i^iUiC'Ji.^.i.^.^J-^A^^^i-A-.i.i.i.. ' OS OX *» CO tO i CO 00 -a OS Ox n, asOSOx£.CO — Ojr IS3 (D — I »»M< i— ( rfs» — CO *>. I — i-1 CO Ox CO i ^3 ~3 ~J ^1 <J . O co CO -J Ox tpk. |i> » d W Oi K) : '•-0!0'aooi*.uw»: OOlWWwiOCD^OlW-i3 S as B3 2 * o B Si C z 3 ft B 9 P*W *vOxOxOS~JGOCDCOO ^3 ~3 .J ~3 tO tO tO tO Ox O' Csx Ox -J -J ~3 tO tO tO -q -J ~3 -J -J~3 0 Ox Oi Ox 0< Oi Ox Ox Ox CO <Q —' O T' ^i C?) O'CJ )Q >- O ^^^.*.^__--*_-_ CO00-JO5 Ox to to to to to to to to to g .(P.da.M 2-v. -OCOGOffii rfi. CO— , CO , CO — CO to £> , 'OS Ox to CO I § oco< 3 Cjx Ox ! g COCO ( I re OS I c« Ox o> ox 4*. co — o g — or — o< *>. 3 co to a^ o a w ci ra - ci * . CO-305>£-COtO — OO ox o> to CO CO CO o to 3 Ox as 3 co — O O CO CO CO w^gk; C as 3 f * !• I - ? « W s » 5 S & *1 a m B " SB 3 i co -a cj ox rfi. co to . OC0C0«3C30x*^C0t0 — I Day of month. SB -tjhJ ^^Sa^^g^H&llg, j?g^^ttg, 51 g^HgW« | Day of week. ~3 ~3 ~3 ~j ~3 — to to CO Ox Ox Ox Ox i ~3 -3 -3 ^3 -J -4 ^3 ^ ac coco -3~3~3~3-4~3~3-4~3^3»J ^3 ~3 ^3 ~3 ~3 to to to to to i ~3 OS Qxrf*. CO — O COCO OS »t». CO— rfi. — OG0C0~3 Ox Ox Ox «OC6 'OS Ox — to OOS Ox Ox Ox OX -J CTi^- CO coo co Ox Ox OX WmC i— O CO COCO~3 Oi o — to to re OS Oi Ox i 03 —' ffiOOil — or o^S? »»| fr <! td g Kg? si 1 § i a ? k 2 -j ~j -a ~j -3OSOiOi~3~3~J~3~3- Ox Ox Ox XCDCDOOmm to to co co co . ~3 ~3 ~3 *.. ** Ox -J -J -3 -3 Ox Ox Ox Ox ~3~3^3<J^3^3^3^3^3-J<jhH OxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOx cotototototototototototo — — — —OCOOO^OiCi^MiOtS — OCO 00^3 OS Ox Ox Ox Ox S^ co to OxCSO»_Oi Ox Ox Ox Ox t-ocococsrr-osox^toi 4*- OS ~3 OS . fc-.i >CO00-v3 Oi! I — — i ' CO 00 CO -4 OS Oi Ox Ox Qx ' "Ox Ox Ox Ox O' ?00-j Oi QxQx co to — o I CO' t** fr* ^ w -I --'-'• > Ox CO O Oi 3 tO Oi ? = o^ S£3 £ 7. 5=2 OOCOOO«JO)Ol^W — oo I Ox Ox— 3CiCO «P — — OCOCOC©00~3-JCiOx JO_ tOOx to Ox tO*- tO to OxOCD«JOiCO— MftOO w to — <: — Ox CO to CO Ox OC rf- Oi CO — — or tog i ? ° • 9 > > f g H 5 fe B *
  • 8. Second Month. FEBRUARY, 1842. 28 davs, MOON'S PHASES. Third Quarter, New Moon, First Quarter, Full Moon, :s. Boston. Neir-York. Baltimore. Charleston. D. H. M. Hi M. H. Mi II. M. 2 5 42 mo. 5 30 mo. 5 20 mo. 5 6 mo. 10 7 10 mo. 6 58 mo. 6 48 mo. 6 34 mo. 18 6 57 mo. 6 45 mo. 6 35 mo. 6 21 mo. 24 11 31 ev. 11 19 ev. 11 9 ev. 10 55 ev. Sun on Meri. l 9 17 25 H . M. s . ev. 13 57 14 33 14 20 1>3 20 Day of month. &A$%$%2%tt$¥$%$&to$ ) $$%'£&to , g?$'$* Day of week. O"-'*. bO£- K Oi m w Ol « W & - W Oi w W Oi » W CJi w W * S 0!OOOWOi-ICO-iOJiO<a3~300C»COCOCOCC00^05 0iWwCD^^ Sun's declen- sion South. OS C5 CO CI < Ji. >£>. *v Ji. , O — 6 i£>- ' "Ox OlOiOii £>. Ji. J- hb- i ** ox ox o ox ox e ©OMMOiG( C« Oi W Oi Ct Oi Oi O' O"1 . 1 Ci Ox Ox Js. to tO >— 00 -. to>^ -. O CB O Ci w CO W Oi i— o 3 O CO o Ox Cn tO CO Qi C» ~3 CO O "_K> 00j£ 5}_C?_ ?_ oi o> en ei cs o< oi ui o"> ui ox ox~ox 53 >to*ototo*otoio>-»>— >— — -i-'g OO-JCi" C0C50xJi^60tOo3 ? Ox Ox Ox MOO OC0 0003^^Wt«iO-Mt-'00- £- £- tv ooK^oijiitiw: IN S3 H * O n r % » Hi(MB 6oco»p».*»-rfi-4*-*'*>-cxoxoxoicjxoxoxox -- ' ,_ it ^ t^:,' to — to *- q^—» cojo •-- <o_— c< cr. co o ojto to_rf^Ox_C5 -j co o - to Ox~Ox Ox Ox~OX Ox Ox «i Ox Oi 65i Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox 07i Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox 0* Ox Ox is. " h^^hi^K.^ . . ... a.* ».» «... «.n *.* > ^ K^ K1 * ^ A*-. >^« X*-> X*7 ? ', —J t— . tO 60F I? = 4^606060 60 00tOW60tOtOtOtOtOtOtOtN?tO OOCO-OOi.^COtO~COrx^Oi4^60tO'-'OCO~3C: o co co to Ox —Ox — OS 5° 00 Ox Oi CO Ox 6Q ~3 > i I C CO CO -3 ©J % 2 Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox « 60 • Ox to —' ' - OOfflOOOO^lOi* o o • *- O O CO CO oc o CWWOX J^"OxOiOxtO;2 0xtOOxtOOxtOCn^t0^rf^^"ibOJ> raocSciccaSw-ocoo? oowoioooc to to j^ to j^ -o ox ox os Oiojox/^i^totoog ? j 5.2 60 eOOx Ox -i g I £> 5 *> Ox_o © >-'_*_>-'_*>_= _ J " a G0~JOiJ^60tO>-'<, ." ^r* o a 3 Fa* e mS2S ^ a o o M » f3 S 3 S to to to to to to to CO-J C5 Ox Ji to CO ;£55£SMtSSoceoo^oac*.*o3*o~ |D"y of month. §SI^?-i^^§d^?^^^§53p 5g^^§^^?2^^ jDay of week. ©©©©csoocococz.c5 0iCO©ODCoc^©Oi^^^a-a--i-J-J-3--;>--:J rj COO- t o ^?-3xcO-itO60^.Ci-3 CO _CO O to 60 *. Ox © -1 CO CO O P OxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOtOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxCjxOxOxO' rji^J^^^^J^>^^ai.60 60 606060606060tOtOtOtOtO tO tO tOtO— g O CO_^_^ 6tx^S(O^ QCO^ODO->^tOtOOCOOO-3 <XOX60tO^O CO." *~* ^. . - _ ^_ . *5 . —* i.^ ^^. _ -» j—v ^ ^s j^r> r*T* ,ix cii i"o —> r^i S ^ ©COCCjj'OlOx^^C/OtO — 3 wO'OCO-lOffl O5O5Oxrf^6060 r o — S to Ox. >-• ? 'ji ox Ox Cji Ox 0< m W to rfi. Ox C5x Ox 2 g tocoox. c:totooxOco6o3 -j 6o ^ o >-' to • Hi-aoiroo-io^ . .,, ,,, ,„ ,,, „, .,, .,, j^ jv, ^ j^ j^ ji. Ji. J^ J^ Ji. Ox Ox O' Ox Ox Ox OX Ox Ox Ox g I ^ £606O6O6060OitO60f^• - to >s> ox os -j oo co c: ^Ji.4i.Ji.Ji.rfi.Ji.*»-OxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOx'g - ^~J^L^JJ^ O"0^ ^3 CO CO O w tO 60_60_4- Ox 05 CO -3 . Ox OX Ox oToTox ox Ox 6x Ox Ox Ox 6x O' Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox OX OX w p ._ -- ,_ ._ m jj, j^ 4^. ji. ji. ji. Ji. ji. Ji. Ji. Ji. J^ tO 60 60 60 63 CO OS to 05 60 g _o!. jS Jo 6o to ^ o fe fe .gL-V£ ax ^g. m to ^ o co coco. <t a» o- ^ to to - ? ococoi oxox^60bo^o|^ocooo~aci r 4oiU, u, ^ooto ni i-i 5, Ox — to J^ to — i— . CO CO "J' Oi «b oo-oc;-aWw #>: >o »-. o. | £ £<o .«> s» to o^o^-a^n^j ifc-"w-h-.o CjJOx^60*-^tO*.tOt02 00 0ttOOxcO v W^60£.^j£-tOO;Ox oxaiOxtorf^Stoco-aoiS oxc7iCiajocto*-*^cocoocoo6o^ 5 5 |S-B |50 2 10' > % Q Fog g^ si § 2 ^
  • 9. Third Month. MARCH, 1842, 31 davs. MOON>S PHASES. D. Third Quarter, 3 New Moon, 12 First Quarter, 19 Full Moon, 26 Boston. H. M. 8 38 ev. 1 45 mo. 5 68 ev. 9 13 mo. New-York. Baltimore: H. M. 8 26 ev. 1 33 too. 5 46 eu. 9 1 ev. I. M. 8 16 ev. 1 23 7/io. 5 36 ev. 8 51 ?no. Charleston. H. m. 8 2er. 1 9 TOO. 5 22 ev. 8 37 too. Sun on Meri H. M. S. 12 37 10 46 8 33 6 7 oo;»-jo}Witkw»>-o cooo~3ftox>£-o3to> |Day of month, g^HSWff3, g^^gttg»9H^^«ijiiPgHjg^Sai«5lg^g | Day of week. *.«OS«>3Wi-' to £>- — pi ^ Sun's declrn- sion South. OxOxOxGtOiOxOxOxftftftftftC^CiiftftftftOOftftftftCjGiCSCiCifta;,;^ rfi.fi.OxO'OxOxOxOx MH">-«uit3MMiOWMWWWWWW2|S5o;aoMwoi-atooK)*>Q<ico-'Wi^C30oo-w«iaxo-wno)Cc P IP 3 ftOCiftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftCiCiOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxji; jcjyj c ai ii en ai c? wi . 3 s: J Cl o a w / Ox tJi. it» w to oo ox QWit'-J-tD- 00 ft co oo -3 £ oioio^ifii^wMwo: - r ox -! ox a ococcftO<4^oototo — — o o 3 OOKCJSi^Cd»(or 3 ? M 2 2 H - * a o ft, CR -. > ^ r a * 3 5*!U Oi Oi Oi Ci W Oi 'Ji Oi Ol C5 OJ Oi SI ffl OJ S5 05 Cl O: 0~. Ol OS C5 O) C3 CJ Q o a a cs n *• it. Ci C CH C« C Oi ^ — i— — — '-''-'tOtOlOtOtOtOOOtOOOOOOOg ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft CI ft ft ft ft ft CI ft ft ft l} Ox G< Gi ~x O' O* Ox ox a 3 mo©ooS' u, ^ |^ WMWm0 S o co cc <i !S oxoxox^^ooto — og — F 1 5s -< >t». oo to !£ to to *> ^oxox^ji-crt^to co wo^oicjii ^g la 3_o o< oo co. to ^ooco ^-^oxja.g co aaccm- oC'PM^i aoa frfr a a rl^a !linoOCOaivICSOx*M-OOg i-OCXC8©CO«jaOii^>0«0< — r I ^ ?* px to Ox O0 _ MOiOW-it'A Ox — CO 2 •<? o a a *? s >• K ft SS 2 H 5 * oo oo to toto to tototo to toto.— •— — — >— ~ —•!--—•-- IDav nf mnntVi ^^JS^H^gfc^H^gd? 3^1 Day of week, OxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxftftftftftftftftftftft — 4*. o< ox ox ox ox o< ox -->->>-*•—>-' — toto to to tototoooooooooi=> ceo — oo ox ft cc co — oo *». ft ~i co o to ^. ox -i cfc o to to oxft oc co>~ to *> St r ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftOxOxOxOxG'OxOxOxOxg" Ox Ox O' Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox O' «O ffi 3: >x ft tt ». w ts w . a > C5 Q Ci O) C; C5 C5 © C O O) i-^O ScO ^ftO^OOtO — 5cOOO~3ftQx.fr.OOtO 3 I^OCOCX5; - Ox4i.rfi.OOtO>— "—3 ' O CO 0C >1 " o<oxox.fr.,{^ooto>— ©3 »g its s 2£ > H 2 CJiOxOxOxOxGxOxftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft;;; ill! ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftOxOxOxOxOxjg CO ^3 at ft O*' 4^ J>- 00 tO — — OCQCOCO-JftftOXtUOOOOtQi-'OOO Ce -4 ~^ft ? 3 "oC0-3 5'0i*.WWt0i-'O2 "OCOOO-I* OxOx»t-*>.OOOOtO^-©g t— S* O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 tf *n-« 4^ - co -j OS a a • ^ -i cc •. rr.2 ©COCO0D~J-aftOx.Ji.tO !>- OS oo to Oj — oococooooo-j-aftoxrf^to*— < -oo?| §?* 2 >— oo 00, oo to toto>— OxtOtOOOOx — «lt??l C»3 COCO^i-Mrf>.<i05*.«lCOOiOWWOitOOxr > a o 185
  • 10. Fourth Month. APRIL,, 1842. 30 davs. MOON'S PHASES. d. Third Quarter, 2 New Moon, 10 First Quarter, IS Full Moon, 24 Boston. H. M. 1 46 ev. 5 47 ev. 1 48 mo. 6 43 ev. New-York. IS. M. 1 34 ev 5 35 ev. 1 36 mo. 6 31 cv. Baltimore. n. m. 1 24 ey. 5 25 fv. 1 26 mo. 6 21 ev. Charleston. H. M. 1 10 ev. 5 11 cv. 1 12 mo. 6 7cu. H | Sun oa Meri. 1 9 H . M . 8 . 3 57 1 37 17 25 morning. 11 57 52 0?0 00<!OiOi^WWi I Day of month, ggg^gSttggg^gSBggg^gSBg> 5> H^HSMg, !?~lPay of week. *.^*.wuwWKiw>-»-i-ooocococDcoa)<i«a»jffiO)aoiOiif.*. Sun's declen- sion North, CD©tOCO*»C}-3COC><OCOCn.*jO Ci 05 OS OS C5 CJ Ol cocococococoeocoM>*o*oio*o*oa CO -q C5_Cn ^.WWH-tOCOJOJ©^? tO *0!~» I co co >*a © en *. co to en enco to ,^toco*>.-cjto-ato • H- O O g Mr-OC£0C-3 0)^^W? . 00 ^ CO tO*.OiW"Ol t—S 2! C9 02 «..' Ox Or tOCO< i men CD O en en en JO CO J^ en en Cn i C5 -J Coi ienenenenenencnenoiOienenenenen[i; to Q' >) oo o " oi *^aicocs5>—'cotfa-oir C5C5C^05C5OSO>ClCSC00jG5a50SC5CiO5OiC5O5O5a5O5CiOiC;OiCSC5C0»5,a3j g WwOtOOS'WOJWtSWwO >— © CO CO -3 5? *-^MWWt5iawO? ClOiOlOi^MWMCncri CO tO CO aaacociO^- en co to o en co en in -3 t* ~2 oocooooo-iaawM' MMCtOCOOOOO^(^IC3*WNlM^ p ** wui«o<iooi"M to to to co aOCCO^OiCyirtiQwOiW^OOiCO^1 ? ? S ej nH P M 5 © 5° S 3 5 | Day of month g^g^SWg'Sg^Sa^g^SH^H^Hgaw:? |Day of week, enenoxenenenenenenenenenenenencnenenenenenenenenenencnenenenf-ijo^ tOtOtOtOtOtOCOCOCOCOCOCOCO*.hfi.^i^4i.t* *'>= b-i K3 Ji fn >i m t*i w f j ^ m ^i co n K3 f jl rn ^i h p sen ci~3 cooj tO^en-JCOCO— tOt£-0<-lCO©'-'CO lii.05-}CO©tOcoen~3! C7503050i050iOien05Ci(J5C50S0505050i05roC105C50iC5C505C75C5050j OCOOOrWWWWMMOl ocet»«3ai **>**. co co co to to > to »A-i oimmj^^M w-> en to co to co a*-* to © ,&. to p to en to as — • ©co>— ccco>£»i—' — to P I? £ 5. ? H enenenoienenenenenenenenenenenenenenenenenenenenenenenoienen i-i*-.*-*— tototototototototocaeococococococo C5-JCC(aO*-»W*.OiO)COCOO'-tOWOi Oi -3 COO i oi aa OS i co co co 05OiGiO;O5CiO;CT3C75CT50iO5O5O501 iCCCOCOCOCOCOCOCOtOtOtOtOtOtOtO(—t r^ i-,i .-.•! X^ >~_i <~> ("-i «* r^ r^ ~i /^*s f-n r-11 05C5C750i05C7iQ5C5C7)5; IC/Jm tototototototo —> — a 2- = i^COCOtO— h-OCOCOPI?03 P -uOCOOO-Jffi'iMOMlMi-i § co en en en en 2 co en to £3 mo-Jen", en — cc cv eg ^^COCOtOtO*-t-'©P j2s co — >f». >— en —' tN coco o> co— to to © >ooco-io>enencotoi i en i— co *- en o> co »3 ~1 ©C0C0C0CC-J[<l0ien*»C0t3O<! *!?? > g a » « r* « rrf! r«gs
  • 11. Fifth Month. MAY, IS 42. 31 di MOON'S PHASES. D. Third Quarter, 2 New Moon, ' 10 First Quarter, 17 Full Moon, 24 Boston. H. II. 8 2 mo. 6 54 77io. 7 26 Two. 4 55 mo. New-York. Baltimore: {Charleston: H. M. II. M. 7 40 Two. 7 26 77io. 6 32 7710. 6 18 mo. 7 4 7710. 6 50 77io. 4 33 7710. 4 19 7/20. H. M 7 50 7710. 6 42 7710. 7 14 7710. 4 43 7710. Sun on Mcri. 11 56 56 11 56 13 11 56 11 56 35 ggBgPgH^g^tfgP!?g^ffgHy!?g^gg»ggg^gg © u>_<»_-j mw^ww -• J Day of month. | Day of week. Sun's declen- sion North. JiJ^JiJiJx4i.Ji.JiJi.JiJi.JijA.J^J^JiJ-JiJi.Ji.JiJi.Ji.;E | — coj>ox©-^co©o — taMJ>oioivixo" K>wcro>j J*, ja. rfa. Jfa 4- J- oo oo ! <l ~3 -3 ^1 -J ~a szi^z to to 0© GO-J©QXJa.CO tO © © CO £ O0 O0 tO tO tO ' p cr>oi <r><i co- co co to i— >-> < OCOOO-10)OiWWM>-00•— © o 3 £-! ©©©co-j©oxj*.oo: J! 53 63 S * O « * a o ^ 3 Ja.Ja.Ja-Ja.JiJa.Ji.4a. Ji 4- Ji J- J- ft. J- Jajijijajijijijajaja. 05 OS -1 GO CO CO O ' CO Ja Ox © -} GO © O — (O CO__^' ~ -)JC CO < to to O©CCCC~3©0'4a.Q0i O © CC -3 © Cn *. CO tO ' — i-« © ©©~oo to to i 00 CO Ox J5 CO Ox to w< i co o» <o mqi. ja -a m -j 1 o o I S o©cc£oooooototo r ja 55 ja 00 Ox 5? OO Ox tO Ox 00 CO 2 tOfiOiCHv: o>w CO »- Ox 00 cog—i <'" Ja t> i—i CC © O' to C» © . 2 to ja ot oi . 3 ^IM OO ©©©CO~3©OxJiO0tO —' O = "OOCflWO)~}~105tX*.tO I "—'OOOxtOCOJaOxOxJa.OJtOtOtO- , -3 CO CO O Oi Ox to -J CO o< Ja CO CT> -> CO wotwcao<Mi(k «-._ ox_*- to co J* -j © oo ja to ox ox © © s a a Pi Si ft *"• * • « 2M " S '" ©©GC-JOOx JiCOtO' I Day of month. g§a2, ?g^^§tti?^g^^g;aS?5H^^^tt«»51H^His;a |Day of week. JaJiJiJajaJiJiJa.JaJaJaJiJi.JJ.JaJaJiJiJ>.JaJi.J.JaJaJaJaJa.O<OxOxOxE! OCOJi.Ji.Jt. JaJa.JaJa.t.JaJaJaJaJa.OxOxOxOxOxOxOxO''. Ox ~ CO © — — to co CO J- Ox © -3 -J CC CO o — to Q3 j- e> g»~JCOO —_to c 3-j-a-4~4-j-3~3~3~3-4-4-j-j-j-j~j~3 -j ~© "©©©©© o> © c - i—. fa— t—• fa— ~ .—• »— fn m fn Pti ."ii fn m r-. r . . © © © © J5 M ,73 — -- fa- fa- >— i— ' OxOxOxOxO!OxOxO'Oxt=«l— c co-a©o«oxjaooto fa- o o co co ^3 © o» ja co oo to »— o co x >i ca c ^ m to »-. r I m = 3 ~ fa*'S OCOCO^-OOCOtOfa-fa->-Oo3 — O CO 00 o CO 00 00 tO tO ~ fa-fa- o ? 52 2 ox oo to*. 2 ca to ox co co i to t*jifa ita 3 OxOtOCOCOO. CCfa-CCCO — C0J-tO3 Ja. © © © • w» *w J^ — J w•CCCCtOCOCSJiOOS Ox 00 Wg Co ? > K o Ji *. rfi. Jj. J- Ji Ji. Ji Ji. Ji. Ji. 0< Ox Ox Ox O^ Ox Ox Ot Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox 0( 0< O' Ox 5J I a x Ox Ox Ox Ox.O< OxOxOxOxOx fa-fa-_i_i t- t-' a »'g' Ui OX Ox Ol C5 -3 -J ~1 CO CO CO O © fa- fa- tO 00 Ji *. OXJ35 -J -J CO CO O — to 00 Js. Ox P lP 3 O'OxOxOx OxO^OxOxOxOxO^OxOxOxOxJ»•J>lfe.4i•J!kJ^J^J^•J>J>J>^Urfi.lb.fei ,- ©QC^COGO~3-JCT)OxO>JiCOCOtOfa-OOCOCCCO~30iOXOxJi.cocO(v3 — g © © 5 fa^ — © © © CO 3 CC © ~3 fa-' CO CO •oo co to to Ox fa- CO CSUiM fa-©©COo fa^COOOtOtOfa-fa-O©i O © IUIK/2 l» fa-tOtOO! CO gi 3 CO -J © C« O' • 2 O > > >— — ©©©0C~J^3O5OxJi.COtO ox—'coox—ojoifa-totocotofa- © OO O CO Ox cj, C3 — fa- CO CO Ox fa- 52 ? § H > W /^. « P©©CCC0^3©©OiJi.C0tOfa-< — 2 a fa-ooji coox"cooxji.ji. O 3 © tO Ox —* r*~' ""* r^1 *•'•* —3 J*. CO OX — CO Ox Ji. Ji CO to OO 2 ^" 5 S £ "' •co©©oo©©©cc — fa- ox en r 1 r- i- 1 r J^^*
  • 12. Sixth Month. JUNE, 1842. 30 davs. MOON'S PHASES D Third Quarter, ] New Moon, J First. Quarter, 1£ Full Moon, 22 Third Quarter, 30 Boston. New-York. Baltimore. II. M. H. M. H. M. 2 7 mo. 1 55 mo. 1 45 mo. 5 30 et>. 5 18 ev. 5 8 ct?. 8ev. 11 56 mo. 11 46 mo. 4 38 cv. 4 26 ev: 4 16 eu. 6 57 eu. I 6 45eu. 6 35 ev. Charleston. 11. M. 1 31 mo. 4 54 ev. 11 32 mo. 4 2 ev. 6 21 cu. Sun on Meri. H. M.S. 11 57 26 11 58 50 ev. 29 2 11 ococo-aoioi^co to ^ IDayofmonth, g^gSUggg^gStfg'gg^ggBggg^ggBg'gg^ |Day of week. C^O*>fc.£*COtOtOi-' Sun's declen- sion North. ^t^rf^t^^rfi.^.rfi.^ji.rfi.^^.^^.^rfi.^^.^ji.ji.^^rfi.ji.^ji. -a est > tO to tO ! ~3 -a -J ~j~3-a~j~i-a<j~j-a-j~3-j-3-j.^~3 C5 Oi 0 Oi , tO bOg oo to o co oo ; co co S ~3 co* . •Mootaoo oo?oo ~w to *. »mm< ^-OCO~JCiOX*.COtOW>'-o3 !— £- O COGO-JCi o i— CO „ tO *• *». CO CO *. rfi. CJX MW2 Ol tO CO CO CO CO i— -J*0 0<U1>->tOCDCOC005CO<!G5COfc3GOS3 ^ M O W d 03 Oi or*, r CO * g g a w S • O o » H 02 o I s g s * a ° r a g H 5 5 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^i^^^^^rfi.Ji.diE *_CO CO to l -3~i^t~X~J~j~l^l-3-J-Z-3-3~Z~3<l-3~2~Z-3-3-l-3-Z-3~l~i~l-3~3X,V) r O CO CO CO 00! 'MMhOOO' O O CO 00 ro WMMHMOOr OCOCOGO~3C}C7i*.COtO i to rfi. to CO " Ci^JCOCii-'OSCOCOOxCO >-0<! to*' OOCOOO-405C7lOiCOCOto: OWMO^i-o3 CO i o a Is h is O CO 00 -J C5 CT^MtJ'-'OCOOO-jaO'^WMi I Day of month. g3ggH»:?H3H3Wg?3H3ggHg>:?H3H£M»:?H3 |Day of week. ^^^^,4^^4^^^^^^^^**********.**.****K tototototototoi—i— a 1 2- s .. — ~ - -. m rt J IB 3 -4 ^j -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 ~a -4 ~3 -4 -j tototototototatototototototototototototototototototototoi-'i-'t KroccaroQcxa!a)Oc-J-j>3»JO>fficsO'0'^^cocot5^^oocpair OOtO^COOOS'WWi 003 HHOOOMffl wMmhmOO! co 3 co co towa to en to * « ; o to f3 o*-4 oji— o — • co co 05 oo * h- oo : > ^^^^Ji^^^**********************K o> Si 05 a< oi w *_* * *^o co u> coco co cocococococococococo**** r OOOOOOCOCOCOCOCOOOCOOOOO~3^3~3CiOaOxCni**-COCO _ .— >— -• 2 . . . P !~' > -!S.«.-.^cn „~ >.., v~ MtOWM iMhmOo3 £ £ O COCOGOo tOtOtO^ o ' OOMMOOtCtfiOOOOj'WMi-'MOOg •— — O CO COCO o MtSfSMMOOr co ii* i-* **•-*#» S towcnk- co 3 w to *. |-, t»to*.^co*»-'g g£ co to a> oo oo jjg q> " -J -3 co * oo o> g * ~ g> -J co i— • go * oo o -J - * r <~ oococooo-3-JOjoxcoto^o|«oococo-a-" to CO Ol* CO CO * "< * C7< to co en toco IP--COOCOC001COP -40>C0t000*.C0Ot0 8s*
  • 13. Seventh Month. JULY, 1842< 31 days. MOON'S PHASES. Boston. New-York. Baltimore. Charleston. D. II. M. H. M. H. Br. H. M. New Moon, 8 2 17 mo. 2 5 mo. 1 55 mo. 1 41 mo First Quarter, 14 5 21 eu. 5 9 e». 4 59 e«. 4 45 eu. Full Moon, 22 6 13 mo. 6 1 mo. 5 51 mo. 5 37 mo Third Quarter, 30 9 58 mo. 9 46 mo. 9 36 mo. 9 22 mo Sun on Meri. II. M. S. 3 24 4 48 5 46 6 9 SSgg^^g^jgSwSgSoS^S^^wwSocooo^oiox^ww^ I Day of month ffl^^g^Hga^^g^Hga^^H^H^g^^g^HgM^g [Day of week OOOOCOfflCtOCOtOOOOOO Sun's declen- sion North. £• rf^- 4^ rf». *» i £» tfc. >fi. £t Ji. | co co -i en o< . to to ^^4-^r^r^^r^^--UH-4-^-^*- #>. rfa.rfa.4^ H O O CD CO . to to ^i^i»j-^^j-a^i~a to to j-j~i~i«3~a.^j^i~i-4^^i~4.j o©tDcococococo£:-toto> £5 o3 MOOOUtOOO* wwi-oo3 -i (J CO CD CO 00 O' 53 4^ to to o< OxC} W to to *>• t— jx i-- i£k *-* —I C3 OS OX tO *-ococo~iOx*>.#-toto ,^o3 i to ^ cj« i— to 2) CTi "- CO tO -J 13 'OtDcc^jo>tntf>-r o«ox>^tototoco2 OAfooio^cor 2 a * © & ° 5 3 -J05 01 ~j ~j -a « SJ ocean -j cd w*..w to »-• o eo co -a at o» *> co «s *>• o co ao «a o> c* £» co to «-« I L d j U1 monin. a^^^Sfl^?^^a«? ^Hga«5^^a,^ |Day of week. 0OxOxOxOxOxO'0<0(OXOxOxOxOxO'OxCxOxOxO<OxOxOxOx>£.>*».*>. >Ji.,&.*».£>.5< pa | •——' •——* •—• <—' •—* '— >— — c^oimcncjiuicjita ~'~ ^MMK)'-.MOCgCDCO-3^0>OaO'»^MMM"MO OCO Cp CO CO CO -J ~J J* S> s I tn tn Crx ,_, i_. _ v_, ,_ |j & =' ^^^lo^l^^^Dlq^Clffil-^^l>lcocoQCl^ocococe^ooo © © © r ? 3 ^"oococdcccc-ij'*.w>owo^ Uxi-'tO COi-'*». — OxJ5^i— t-tot02 QxtO-JUX-J'-'OxCOO. OlOOiMOiJ 'OOCOCOCC™ *»CO to ,3 s »!«#> tO ' Ql CO Cg QX 3 fl. _ |_ _ _ _ «^ MMOocococcco-affi^iboji-oo- CO Ox to *>• - >ti.i-'*».i--cO#»-Ol4^i— 0Ol»-1 to cjxo^-a^iosoaito^cco^oxcooo - ' ocococo-jo50x*-coto to *>. ox ox ji. w to to w s h?StoP O} n- 00 to -4 — ©4a.<£>0©*.C©r, [??' > 2 G ** • fiS f s?Sg J
  • 14. Eighth Month. AUGUST, 1842, 31 days. MOON'S PHASES. D. New Moon, 6 First Quarter, 13 Full Moon, 20 Third Quarter, 2S Boston. H. M. 10 1 mc. 38 mo. 9 30 ev. 11 5 ev. New-York. Baltimore. H. M. 9 39 mo. 16 mo. 9 8ev. 10 43 er. H. M 9 49 mo. 26 mo. 9 IS ev. 10 53 ev. Charleston. H. M. 9 25 mo. 2 mo. 8 54 ev. 10 29 ev. b i Sun on Meri. jgggg^g^ggBggg^gfeiWggg^ggii'ggg^g^" I Day of month | Day of week. OOtOfflCOOOO' frO if* Sun's declen- sion North. coioioiytaait«oioioio<oioioioio»oi to fro fro to Ol ifrCO to Oi Oi Oi Ci CO CO CO !& O1O5C0O 5 w O O _CO-^J CiCn^MMM O CO 00 -3 CJlO»Ol OiOi** CJ»Ot OlOt coto!-- © ^ £>. ^ j^ *>. rf^ a OiOiOiOiOiOiOiCiCiOiOiCi»l-*l -300 CO- CO 0000 ~3 -3 -3 ^WWUW"i CO -I -J -3 CO J^ Qi OOCO(»QO(Xl«lS "frO *>• CO CO CO 00 Ci >-> © fro Oi 00 -j -j -j -j -a .j x frO CO *> Oi -J CO . iiv rn fn ^ 3 " 5S Oi Oi £. CO frO frO i CO frO >£ >— > OtOOCOiOi^WWM'-OO' OCDOOOOi ^ « B S * © 6 » <!»;> 3 S * I Ox Oi I fro fro O'OxOiOiOvOiOiOiOxOiOxOiOiOiOxOiOxOxOxOxOxOiOxOVi ) Oi Oi ' CO CO CiOiCiCiOiCiOiGiOiOiOiOiOiOi«3-*J~J~4-3-J-~l~J-4-3' frOCOrf^Oi-400CO©tO( OOtOCDCCOO-J^ CO to 'ocooooc~a~3~aj'*-wtoi-»og -fr30<MO<W«5 i^^i^WW^ ^Oo-"!? CO CO ' — oo a oi o »i c . ^w- acs >£> oi to cji co !*». Oi -j • o - o 3d = MMOOC0d00«l^lUl|f>.»>-'MO2 i— co *> >— ** >— rfi o< tnfrooim fro 3 ^)GCGOtOOiCOOifrOCOCO#>CO~lGiCiC03 •-' - © CO00-3 Oi Oirfi frO ! ) to -J — -3 00 *>. CC OCi ! 2 *. P 3 32 ^ft n «S t &* ©CO0C-3OiOi*>-C0tO i_, I Day of month. Ox Ox Oi Oi C7< Ox 0<0<OiOiO<0'0>OxOiOxOiO<0<OiO<OxO«OlO(0>OxOiO>0»0'J5 frOfrOtOtOtOfrOfrOfrOfrOtO'-'i-'i— >_.i_i -.i-.>-ii--i_i_i " soo-jc;cnO'^cotO '-'O cooo^3aiOiox>P>cofro>-'Ocooo-ja>0'>)^ >t^co fro " ' OiCiOi©iCiCiOiaiaiOiOiOiOiCiCiOiOiO:OiOiOi»i»I-l-a~4 " co4^Ci-^co©frocoo'C-.-Ji©©froco^ "- ' m-j<xcO'-Mo3^.oiC3>3coo-rt I?3 - O B 2 O COC79 0000<J-J5J - rfi-COfrOr-o3 — ^OCOCOOOOO-Jo CO frO i— o i— co oi fro co—'S ^rfij^^^^ i^. >-* co co coaT^frofrofro " CD O Ci CD Ci Oi Oi ~ " tP>. tO 63 tO 3 2*.CDt«Ji.3 r* OB 2 S2 » CO CO Oi J^- *. CO to frO 1— i OS Oi Ci Oi OS Oi Oi < frO frO frO frO CO CO CO ( fro fro fro fro i '00 CO -3 Oi ( Ci Ci Ci Ci < CiOi fro fro fro i 4^ CO frO i Ci'Ci C5~< iCooo-j^ mo'O'. lOiOiCiOiOiCidiM 3 C OCOCOGOOC~3-J^'^*>-COfrOi CO Oi > frO GO 00 "— Cn . «imw*.^M3 l=s' to CO CO CO 00 00- Ox i-» rfx i OOCOCOOOOO<J~3050itfc-frO^-0- OOCOOOOO~3050x*.frO' 53 ill > % Q » J p SS5
  • 15. Ninth Month. SEPTEMBER, 1842. 30 days. MOON'S PHASES. D. New Moon, 4 First Quarter, 11 Full Moon, 19 Third Quarter, 27 Boston. New-York. Baltimore. Charleston. H. M. 5 31 ev. 11 14 7/10. 1 50 ev. 10 21 7710. H. M. 5 19 cv. 11 2 mo. 1 38 ei>. 10 9 mo. H. M. 5 9ev. 10 52 mo. 1 28 cv. 9 59 mo. H. M. 4 55 eu. 10 38 mo. 1 14 er. 9 45 mo. morning. 11 57 J3 11 54 26 11 51 38 I Day of month. S^dggg^HgaffgHgHSaffgg^^affWg- .['Day of week. cocotacocn iO On o o o <o fO C5 Oi OC 10 Oi cc to Oi oc Sun's declen- sion North. O Oi Oi O" Ci Oi Oi o> o> oi o< Oi Oi Oi Oi co to to to to Qi Oi Ol OI (t>. Ji. rfi. Ji. H o3 Ci Oi Ol OI Ol Oi Oi O Oi 0> O' O Oi Oi Oi — • OiCiCi^.^>P*^ lt' (J^ >^ 1J-..^ 1^C0 03 00COOOOOCOCOOitOtOtOtO: oo i — o co oc -jmw'^mo-ocg^uivi ^^jiJ-o ccc^c: oi oi wi ci en ot a q m m q oi C5 O) ro q 35 C3 o; 5; m o; 6 c g; c: ^OiOiOlOiOi >— >—>-''— >-'i-'tOtOtOtO to OJOiW (5i-WWKlOOOMi|iOl^tCMt3j>.QOc(Oi-wCiC)KO >-^W OCDOOGO.^GiCiOi^'^OOtOi-'OO *-OCO(XCC<103 05ii CO tO K 8S i 2 i © o 3 bob 8 e ^ t- g,|s 2 S 5 gr is - S s- w 5? S P1 f- « v oo to 3 , S *s ~3 Oi 4^ CO ( to oo ra -j ho3 2 H o 5" C« OiOiO'OiOiOiCiO<OiOiOiO<OiOiOiOiOiOiOiCiOiCiOiOi Ov c m oi oi oi oi oi oi 03 n ro O) a Oi O) n o: Ci Oi S3 Oi Oi Oi cr. cr. ci Oi Ci Q3 O -3 GC O M M v' CO 00 Oi Oi OC-JCiCiOi5; - *>OOtOi-'Og OO 1 — og O' oj 2 WWWWM2 ooooi O O KOQi. OI -J -3 Oi rf>. »" OJ ^ CC 00 ~i ~3 Oi a> Oi to «— «|gg Oi oo to i Oi to O ' 'H-OOCOCOOOOO^OiOiOOtOi— O ; 00—* £». to Oi>—00*> iCCOCO>£-OtOC<CCOO O CO CO 00 -4 Oi Oi 2 ? ? IS SI ® ft 2 M 5 o f° s s » Oi to to to tototototototo—''— — >-» — — <— ~ — — oco»l~iOiOl*w^s-oo(X-^a)0'l^w^^-0(occ^oiy*•utwl-' |Day of month. ^^^M5g^H^«*5g^Hgtt«5H^]sajp3g |Day of week. OiOlOiOiOiOiOiO<OiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiCiCiOiOiOiw'OiX|?:c/}' ft> > M OiOiOiOiOiOiOi^4^4^^^t^i^rf^^i^^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOtoi» 5*£ ' " 5> _Oi Ol**00tO — OCOOCGC^10iO'4^00iO — OCCOC~J-iOiCJi*»-OOtO — o co r I :- 3 I *i ~ OiOiOiOlOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiCiCi OS W r« „ t S'^l C* OiOi*.OOtO — OCOOOCC-J_. OlOiCiOiOiOiOiOiCTiOiOiOiOiOiOiCiCiOicnciOiCis ' to to to to to to 00 i di zr. gO> Oi Oi Oi Oi i-'OOOiQiCOO'— C<34^Oi00CO'— tSi^Oi-JCOCtO^Ui-JCr — —' i CO CO 00 -3 -J Oi Oi ' O CO0C 00<l ~I Oi o 00>t»-ji.002 03 00*.0ii— oo oo ' =3 oc CO Oi Oi £>. -j £>. oo '*« oo to — O 00 00 >&*»• oo -> cc coo o co3 OiOiOiOiOiOiCiCtOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOi t^ 00 00 Oi o» Oi oo Oi Oi Oi Oi Oi ^OOiOiOi coo to oo *> OiOiOTOiOiOiOiCiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOiOi OiOiOi i— - — i-« <-> h- i Oi~3 CO Qi— 00>t>.Oi>300CPH^ tOOOOiOi ~3 O CD 00 -4 ~3 ' i-i 00 tts. ' ^> Oio cQ. o> oi ox oi oi 55 00 OO OO Oi 00 goo~a«3Cao»r Oi Oi Oi Oi Oi -1 Sw| > 58 ft —? ft S p ^lOiOi^'t^.OOtOi-'Og ; — (£"—2 *>. * Oi Ol Ot -> Ji. S) to . — ^( to Oi -a = 52 I— N-i o coco 0000~3-J.0iOi<J-irf».lOi-'o3 ^-ococooc AtOOKOOlw i-1 0O 1 JOWOlMWOl ^w"OiOOiCO>-rfi.COOOOOOCOP ©OX0000*<-OlCOCOCCH- ~3 -J Oi Oi t^- . 2
  • 16. Tenth Month. OCTOBER, 1842< 31 days. MOON'S PHASES. D. New Moon, 4 First Quarter, 11 Full Moon, 19 Third Quarter, 26 Boston. H. M. 1 40 mo. 1 57 mo. 6 28 mo. 7 57 ev. New- York. H. M. 1 28 mo. 1 45 mo. 6 16 mo. 7 45 ev. Baltimore. h. a. 1 18 mo. 1 35 mo. 6 6 mo. 7 35 et>. Charleston. H. M. 1 4 mo. 1 21 mo. 5 52 mo. 7 21 cu. Sun on Meri» H. M. S. 11 49 40 11 47 19 11 45 26 11 44 11 ocooo-joox^osto- _JDay of month, g^gglgg^ggjgggg^gjggggggjgggg JDa/of week. »fc> to ** to ** K> *» to os — ox os •— *». to £. — ox os »t>. to ox o3 — - AM- m^lUiWM OOOiOJO~aOxiOCOOxtOCOOitO Sun's declen- sion South. os cs a> a> a> as a^ sj oi^osi— ocsscor A A *. *^ A Ox CDOtOWOiQ)QOCO>-tJ».Ox>x;00 OxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxO'OxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOx to to to to 0< Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox Ox . OS to CO OS OS OS a ': ,3 = »00-J05O5OiJ-'Ji*.W)SMO3 — OCOOO-iOiOxX Ox OS K> , 66 -4 -J ^ -J Ox !3 tO CO Ci -3 *» 00 CO • COOO-JOx4*.OStOtO—0< m-OOCOOO^IOiAWWM-OO; Si W B • *4 OB > 2 § 2 w ft, BD J? > p r a * w » L. "l 3 o S W Ci05O5OiC5O5OiO5C5O5OJCT30iC5OiO5O50iO50105C75C505CiOi05C3CiOx0xJi; Jijj Ox o< 3 $'! oceoo^oo*.wM-o-ccoo! £>- rfi. ^ ox Ox Ox Ox OS 00 COO OxCJxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOx Ox Ox (5 os rfi. 2 rf* tO — O - -COOO^OiOOxJJ-OxAOSlOi-'Og — OCOCC-aOOifS Ox to to to to os *«. 00 Qx OS A — A >t>- ,- . ._.„ -> s —> 2 oxox^ox — os-totototoostostotototoos*'- « ' P OOOOQiBm -M- Oi ^1 CO r -Q O CO S OOQxr - " OiOx*>. OS o ox cole — O < MOOtOCOCCCC-JOJOJAWMM Ox Ox'i— to*. — A>-'>£.>-'!£Ox_*>.tO '00-aO-JCOA WrfiO) — o~iocook>co o 3 mOOCOKCO tO 2 OS Ox — OS Ox t«P GO OA to OS 00 -a or to tog OSS & * ocooc^oox^coto — 1 Day gf month . RttSSg^gWSSg^SStt^g.^gSteSg^^B? |Day of week". OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOxOxOxH|pac OCOOO-JOOxrfxOSlOi rfkOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOtOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxE U) r 15, !_ 1-1 !_. I_l I— I— I— iOtOtOtOKJtOtOI COO — tSAOiffi-JCD O to CO *>-0-JCOOtOCOOiC5GCCO' *». tO — O | — OGC^J-JCJOx^-Ox^OStO — OS — OC000-3OOia! ox os to ?. 5S AWM3 1- OXOX —OsStOtOtOOSOSOS-JOSOStOOSOS*. n mU<^tooooxos 3 totoox^ — ox-ar ox cs 00 to os 3 to o co o o co cc • -roo If > B' 5 2. ? H OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOxOxOxOxOxOxOxE pfl OO^l^OiOx^OStOtOi-'' OxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOiOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOxOx COO 1 w»,mo3 — o co 00 -3 o 01 ; Ox^tfe-OS-i to tO — 1— tOCO Ox I -3 co os =s cTiOoo-^tJ^ta! 'Ox A OS lOi ,3~S0(Doo«i-3 0io ox os to : ox *>. co — < — oo®oooo«j-jmaot*WM o- to OS — Ox OS OS tt*. tOOx — OxtO*n— OSOStOf~ O — OxOXrfi.030COOxOCOOtO~10COOOX( oocooooo-jooxox: 3&: * ft i? « 2 2 a
  • 17. Eleventh Month. NOVEMBER, 1842. 30 days. I MOON'S PHASES. D. New Moon, 2 First Quarter, 9 Full Moon, 17 Third Quarter, 25 Boston. H. M. 11 24 mo. 8 31 ev. 10 45 ev. 4 15 mo. New-York. H. SI. 11 12 mo. 8 19 ev. 10 33 cv. 4 3 mo. Baltimore. H. M. 11 2 mo. I 8 9 er. 10 23 ei>. 3 53 mo. Charleston. H. M. 10 48 mo. 7 55 ev. 10 9 ev. 3 39 mo. a>> Sun on Mcri. /' H. M. S. i 11 43 43 9 11 44 17 11 45 9 25 11 47 12 I Day of month. gg^ag^^ggWgggjggjiggggjgaggg^ pay of week. CO ^ C5 -1 GO Sun's declen- sion South. woa^aoifew-oaai^eiji. co aoaa c: ;; 4> co -q-j-js-.c. h- J i^^^t^^U^^^i^.^^^^^^^^.^^t^rfi.*.,^,^**,^.,^.*.,^.,*^;!; •j^ffioooooowMisui^SioiaantcOMNcsoia^SDOwHr oi^wwog -» o go -j oso* g'OaOi *>• oo to •-* o 9 ^otooo^noi* ox F CO — ^ CO ^ *0 OiifcWW?t5W^««-'»-1i-"- — £ to * 53 IS OD«ao5tn*>w»w-< *-Moo(aoc«j05ai*-w(0' o= --©: S'Oo£ >< 0D ?> 2 o h f 2 S a S * S?. O ft. <*- £9 r g * M jrf * "J a 2 B ° 3 5* p * •J ^ *4 »4 —4 ^3 OS Oi O} OS Ci O} OS OS OSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSCSOSCSCXOSOS! Dpi .fe-_CO Jrf.PJ^JJ^r? Rtf M M' UUUUUUUUUUUUi^i(O IP iO Q3 M 4^ A C Qi Ol -3 «3 X "J O Oa-4Ci0iJ-a0i*WMfc-O= — OC00C~JCT>O'S o<! [ GC COS OOOOti ^j OS Ox >£. to ' l_ _- _ V< ~: ZC 4- i± *. O < MOffltOO)00«J050iA«M'-00= — © CO CO 00 ~J it? — co o* —« *> to >&• 01 oi .*»• oo co £ n mw»mw^ I52BH o a a n2«« • - < * 2 Q 2 m 5 * OC0(J0^a5 0i*.WW-' OCOOC-JOlOi^-COtO — I Day of month. ^HgU^^H^HgflJwgjH^Hgttw^H^^SU^^H^H | Day of week. -J~a»JOS0505050JCSC5C50iC100SOJC;OSCiO:OiOJ0505Ci0505050>CJa Oi^OiOiC^OiOiO'Oi4i.^.J>.i^.^*-^i^.*>-COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOto" M^o cpGc-j momtO'-'OcoM^O't-Mt^^ota^gi^'J-cJto-'a £. *» ^ *> "_ *>.*>. *i a- ~~ ** #». j- *> *>. i- " ^ ^- "i- i. 4-'_- — — — — — — — ~ WWWWWWWWWW,tipfcifr*.*'Aitki(>A*.i|i.AOiOiOC!'0'OiO'0' c^c^c^^-^^gcc/icpcoq- — toM4^rf^oxm-Jooco o.-.tooj.fr.oxos~j r Ox ,&. to — © | -OO-JomS-OOiiAWM-oS — ©CO00-JC5©Xo o» to — ox *. coq to— Oi *> ib S h >— — — — — *o a to to — — — — to w —>£» — oc OS Ox 3 O<(£*> Ox CO CO . COCSOxOx~lCO— B tO tO CO OS *. OS *•• • -J girl ft" * £ 2? B 2 CSOSOS J^ *. 4- _Ox_0' S£ 4». *-"rf*- O) O; CS 05 v) Q ffl ' C; OS c: * os c~> * c. OS os os wS OS ~. —.».«.». c; i to — I o co: & & en cji tn oi oi t« CS OS ~3 -i GO CO COO >— •— eO CO ife- >t>- Cjx C7i -J CO .caifrjbj^i 63 — OC00C~lOi^'05tnt>.C0t0i->o3 — OCOGC^JOJC^o V« CO to •- — i— — S i— —• to to 2 CO CO CO CO CO CO Ji. ST i— 0< COCO O O . CO rf^ OO gitO 00 - tO Oi -J ffiffivl CO • GC to— < Ji. cote oo < S o c© c© oq ~j -3 ojo8 c^»t>. coto — og — o cbeboo-a-aas? « w O"- w oi « ^ to co co to i—— a to co »i — co tn >— g i — OCrfi-i— COOx«JiOOrOtOO*>0<#'»» A © M » A O C? C5 r P ft ? n ST M 5! ?§B^
  • 18. Twelfth Month. DECEMBER, 1842. 31 days. MOON'S PHASES D New Moon, ] First Quarter, i Full Moon, i: Third Quarter, 24 New Moon, 31 Boston. H. M. 11 31 ev. 5 40 ev. 2 2ev. 1 ev. 2 18 ev. New- York. Baltimore . H. M. 11 19 cv. 5 28 ev. 1 50 ev. 11 49 mo. 2 6 ev. H. M. 11 9 ev. 5 lSeu. 1 40 ev. 11 39?/io. 1 56 ev. Charleston. H. 31; 10 55 ev. 5 4 ev. 1 26 c». 11 25 mo. 1 42 ev. Sun on Meri. . H. ftl. s. 1 11 4U 16 9 11 52 3/ 17 11 56 24 '2b CV. 23 ocooo^oid^ww- _^Day of month. ^g^ggggggj^^gggjjggg^g^ggHgfg [Day of week. Sun's declen- sion South. — oo co co co to to to to to to to to to to to to to »-- - - ,b. ,fe. 4s. 4^ ^ i_ _ w S'c !B-^OOCOCOOOQ5-imQ}0' >&-03MW-0(000-}OiOi».MtO.H' I ^ = COCOCOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOtOiOtOtOlOtOtOtokl"-£cooococococococotototototototototototototototototototototototo w «. .--r. ,k..'^'/-,'3.SSm , ^» ^. 3. ,». «i' ^ .1 *.. L. .— H !-* S „« , ^ „„ ^ co <tb.co*oo| • co to CO 03 n . - OS CO CS -J jbj __ >—ococo<ienib.i£».cotoi-i-*<: -oococo^icicntb.cototo oco«aocn^ CO CO CO tO i— Cn'", COtOi-iCnib.Co2>-i>— i-i Cn Cn ib. )b S3" »'- -3 ib- O P >)»m^mi-i* COqS'--~3CnenenP Qi^M^MroQi- P *o co co to mm >—• to ib. ts won- >—•' >— OCOCOCOOStOCiCn CO CO C5 ib'-'COib.OCiib.tOOCnOOCOCOtO h-» CO ib. Cm-> ib. Si 03 * M "* ST* 2 ? P 5. j. ^ a M 8 *° S 5 S -J -3 to to -a C3 >b- ib totototototototo 05 co as en oi_cnrf^_rf* ib.ib.>b.ib.|b.|b.|b.|b. ^J -J -J -J .q -4 -J -q -J «J «J| .J ~J ^!^«1 ~J <J -4 ~3 -5 X ?3 &G tSMtSMWMMMl-MMMMW -!-!- 1-1 ,— g S'C WCJ tO'^i-'OtOgOO'iaiP'O'AMtSMOTXiOO-jr xa 4^rf^,b.ib.ib->b.4vib.ib.ib.ib.ib.ibib.|b. lb.|b.|b.|b.ib. if^"|ij I a rj) COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOOOCOg LFSlb- CO CO tO KXJMMMMMM OOOl—>-'" — — — Pi'' 3 O Cn ib. CO tO ! iocooociCn^-Cienibcotoi-'oP co oo -a en >b. co to h- o to I CO tOi >*B> tO QO CO to CD H- tfe.*- GO ^4 5° rft£^|b.cOib.Cn a £©0O00C5Cn,b.rc ? en en en t» g-4 -3 CS CO 00 co to • r* ©COCOCO~3C}Cnib.COlO>-i i— to ib- i— co tb- co co co co en OCOC5rCOOOib.OQOaitb.COtb. 3 ~z: ococc-jcocntb-cotoi I Day of month. ^g.^tt?'5g^S*^3g^ga«g?5t g^^ttg} -5g |Day of week. ocooo-3aacn^.co.M "a; lb. lb lb. ib. i ^J^ib-ibib.ibtb.ib.ib.ib^ibib.ib.ib.tb.ib.ib.ib.ibib.ib.tb.ib.ib.Ji.^i.y CjDjjq J^^ib-^tb-ibibCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCoUis'S ^ooc?to^~oco<r> coco<t<>^ cocoCT)Cncj»0'C7<cn en t<^ tb CT_oi_cn oi o» oi r^ I" 3 !—» q P i_i i- rrt fr> ffi rii ^' (T en Ji. ^,i xi w n 3 i—i r^» rr* i~^i _-i <••« tv &? ffl jg cd en ^ co — o g i—ocooociCn; S ki ki w w o< ^ ^ w io m en ib. ! OCOQO 3 ~l~lCJ5tb.tOtO 'oientb-cotot—os o O 00 lb- to to CO CI i o eooo-j en * en en OC CO CO CT> tO CO -3 -J-^-J^^^^^-^^^^<lOiC0C0CftO3O3CDCftOiCDOiC7iCnC75C5C5CiC5ij33 enenenenenenenenenenenenenenib.ib.ib.ib.^1 entbibib.cococototot-i<-ioocococo-jcsaientb.tbcoto>-'t-'ococc~3ciri| o<oicnenib.ibt4^.bib.ibib.ib.ibtb.,b.ib.|b.ib.ib.ib.ib.ib.ib^ enenenenenenenoienenenenenenenenen-enenenenoienenenenoi*'=i cococooo--}~jcooia'entb.ib.tb.cj3cococotototo totOtototototo r' &<J^ S £ » H S > Mis ci en ib^ to i— o ©©3 -b©(»«3Cj' cntbtb.-icocotot— • c^enenenenenen n^*-tototolv", r^ rn *v1 ^ rT^ r*^ -Li. "' " tn CI (O o; 'O W = COO ococo<i05SJ - eni^cotoi i-i SenenenenL--ocoto. ooo-otoa to -a — to -j rn m a o: - © -: — ocox>oc~joa>enib.coto — o- — oocococc^jcsrQ; toosci^to enen >— to >b. tocoeni—>-ii-'^-">-'co2>b.en>-'ib. tocotbaS;C55cocooo>toa5encococ5tb.i— cotb-oanbtooeno-ococotoi— o*i~jr?t Fig f g.H
  • 19. AMERICAN ANTI-ST.AVERY ALMANAC. VOTES FOR PRESIDENT, 1840. Popular Vote. 1836. Electoral Vote. 1840, States. Maine, N. Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New-York, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, N. Carolina} S. Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Mississippi, Tennessee, Louisiana; Missouri, Arkansas, Total in twen- ty-five States, In 1840, Harrison. 46>612 26,158 72,874 31,601 5,278 32,440 225,817 33,351 144,021 5,967 33,528 42,501 148,157 68,489 46,376 (Chooses 40,261 28,471 65,302 45,537 22,933 19.518 60,391 II, -296 22,972 4,363 V. Buren. 46,201 32,781 51,944 25,296 3,301 18,018 212,527 31,034 143,672 4,874 23,752 43>893 124,732 32,616 33,782 Electors 31,933 33,991 51,604 47,476 21,131 16,976 48,289 7,616 29,760 6,048 Birney. 194 111 1,415 174 42 319 2,808 69 343 by 1,274,203 1,128,403 Harrison's majority 145,900. Harrison. 15,239 6,228 42,247 18,749 2,710 20,996 138,543 26,137 87,111 4,733 25,852 23,368 105,405 36,687 23,626 Legisla 24,930 16,612 41,281 14,292 4,072 9,688 35,962 3,383 8,337 1,238 6,831 737,711 In 1836, V. V. Buren. 22,990 20,697 34,474 19,291 2,964 14.039 166,815 25,592 91,475 4,153 22,268 30,261 06,943 33,025 2C,910 ture. 22,126 20,506 32,7S0 17,275 7,332 9,979 26,1-20 3,653 10,995 2,400 763,58? . maj. 25,879. Har. 10 14 8 4 7 42 8 30 3 10 21 15 15 Har. maj. 174 The Ballot-Box. We have a weapon, firmer set And better than the bayonet-^- A weapon that comes down as still As snow flakes fall upon the sod ; But executes a freeman's will As lightning does the will of God. " I'll aslc my Wife." That is what old Judge Thatcher, of Massachusetts, said to Blount, of North Carolina, when they were members of Congress, at Philadelphia, and when the latter challenged the Judge to fight a duel . " I'll ask my wife, sir," replied the Judge, taking off his three-cornered hat and making a bow ; " and if she is willing, I'll meet you." Unconstitutional Law of Alabama. "And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for any person to seize and make a slave for life, to his own use, any free person of color who may have come into the state of Alabama since the first day of February, 1832 ; and be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for any person to seize upon and make a slave for life, any free person of color who may be found in the state of Alabama after the passage of this act, and who shall have come into the state since its pas- sage."—Approved, Feb. 2, 1839. It will be perceived at once that all this is in direct defiance of the following provision of the Constitution of the United States. " The citizens of each state shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of citizens in the several states." — Constitution of the United States, Art. IV. Sec. 2.
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  • 22. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERlf ALMANAC. Notes on the Census Tables. 1. The ratio of increase is surprisingly uniform in each ten years$ having never Varied more than a small fraction from 34 per cent. This will give a population, in I860, of 22,848,581, and in 1860, of 30 millions. It doubles in 24 years. 2. The increase of the free states is about 39 per cent., and of the slave states but 26. At this rate, they will stand, in 1850, in the proportion of 4 to 3 in population^ and in political power as 7 to 4. But the disproportion is every year greater. 3. The increase of the slaves in the preceding ten years, was 29.5 per cent. ; in the last ten, only 24*5 per cent. Had the ratio been the samej the number would have been 2,581,646. The difference) 98,1 10 j nearly a hundred thousand, must be set down as the waste of life created by the opening of the new plantations in the 3outh West, the growth of sugar, and the misery created by the forced removal of the hundred thousand victims of the American Domestic Slave Trade. 4i The new states have gained, in slaves, beyond their proportion, 315,125. So many Americans have been forcibly removed from home and kindred under our Re- publican Government. 5. The increase of the free colored people is 57,3362 or 21 per cent* The small- hess of the increase is not easily accounted for. The increase in the free states is 24 per cent;, that of the South but 19 per cent. 6. The increase of the six new free states and Territories of the North West, is 102 per cent. Should the same ratio continue, which is highly probable, those states will have a population of about six millions in 1850. 7» The proportion of slaves to the white population, in 1830, was 15.5 per cent. S in 1840, it v/as but 13.9 per cent. 8. The Federal number is made, according to the TJ. S. Constitution, by adding to the free inhabitants, " three fifths of all other persons," i. e., of slaves. The num- ber of representatives has been calculated on the supposition that they will be ap* portioned at the rate of one per 60,000. By the Federal numbers, the slave states have 97 representatives in Congress 5 by their free population they would have but 73 ; were all the population free, they would have 104, or rather, there would then be no distinction of North and South. 9. By the new census, the slave states will have 38.6 per cent, of the federal power—by the census of 1830 they had 41 per cent.—by their free population they would now have but 32 per cent.—by the whole number they would have 40 per cent. 10. Slaves have no political power, no political consideration whatever them* selves, being, in fact, mere property ; but the southern states have 24 representa* tives on account of the slaves—24.7 per cent of their representation, equal to 9 per cent, of the federal power of the union as the mere representatives of property— and such property. N. B. No other species of property entitles a state to political power. 11. Three of the free states, New-York, New-Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and three of the slave states, Maryland, Virginia, and Missouri, have each one representative on account of their free colored inhabitants. 12. The land dividend is calculated upon the supposition that there will be three millions of dollars to divide yearly, under the act of Congress of 1841. The table shows what each state will receive by the federal numbers, according to the existing law, and what each would receive were the distributions made according to the free population, who alone can be benefited, and who alone can be taxed to make up the deficiency to the TJ. S. treasury. 13. By the census of 1790, the free states had 60 per cent, of the white population, 45 per cent, of the free colored, and 50 per cent, of the whole. Now they have 68 per cent, of the white, 44 per cent, of the free colored, and 57 per cent, of the whole. 14. In 1790, the population of Virginia, 748,308, was greater than of New-York and Pennsylvania together ; and Ohio had not begun to be settled. Now Virginia is behind all these States. 15. Virginia, with 70,000 square miles, has now but 50 per cent, as many people as New England, with 66,000. In 1790, she had 70 per cent. New England has in- creased from 1,009,813, to 2,432,818—an increase of 142 per cent, in 50 years, while Virginia has gained, in the same time, but 491,489, being 65 per cent.
  • 23. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. Illinois and South Carolina are now equal in power—i. e. the 267,360 free people of S. C. weigh as mush in national influence as 475,852 in Illinois—about in the pro- portion of two Carolinians to three Illinoians. And when it comes to receiving money, each free person in Illinois divides 18.8 cts. and each free person in South Carolina 32.6 cents, or in the proportion of $1 to a Carolinian as often as the Illi- noian receives 57 cents. New Jersey has a free population greater by one-tenth than that of Alabama, yet New Jersey receives $70,130, from the public purse, and Alabama $91,996. The free population of New Jersey is greater than that of Mississippi and Louisiana together, which states receive by the land distribution $28,167 more than N. Jersey. On the free basis, the six northern states would receive $460,366 yearly, and the six southern states only $299,165. Consequently, they first gain 12 represen- tatives for their slave property, and then a yearly gift of $115,980, for being the owners of property so peculiarly meritorious ! While New England is mulcted in the yearly penalty of $40,224, for the crime against republicanism of refusing to hold slaves. New- York has a free population of more than half the entire south, yet she re- ceives but 38 per cent as much money. Her power to uphold the government and defend the country is greater and more available than that of the whole slave sec- tion, because she has no internal enemies ; yet she has 40 representatives and they 97; she receives $456,636, and they $1,181,702. By a free basis, New-York would receive $500,357, and the whole south $991,206. Mountains. " For the strength of the hill, we bless thee I Our God, or fathers' God ! Thou hast made thy children might, By the strength of the mountain sod ! For the strong pine of the forest That by thy breath is stirred — For the deep gorge of the mountain, Where thy still voice is heard — For the deep storm on whose free pinions Thy spirit walks abroad — For the strength of the hills we bless thee ! Our God, our fathers' God !" The spirit of liberty dwells in the mountains ! It was with the Scots who bled with Wallace ! It was with Switzerland, on the hills of the Vandis, sustaining the Waldenses against their ruthless persecutors ! It was with William Tell when he fought for the freedom of his native land ! It was with the Tyrohse, when on the green hills of Tyrol the gong of freedom sounded ! It is now with the brave Cir- cassians, on the hills of Caucasus, assisting them to crush the hordes of the Rus- sian tyrant ! We expect, ere long, to see the movements of the same spirit in the mountains of East Tennessee. Southern Debts. The South is indebted to the manufacturers of slave-shoes in Lynn, Massachu- setts, about $3,000,000 ; to the city of New York more than $100,000,000 ; and to the whole North from 3 to $500,000,000. Such statements we have seen going the rounds of the press. Can they be true ? If so, we seem to have something to do with the domestic system of the South, at least so far as the Northern purse is con- cerned. Can the South pay their debts in money? It is conceded they cannot. What then have they beside their growing crops ? Twelve hundred millions in slaves. But these will not sell for a single dollar in our northern markets. We fear that there is too much truth in the assertion, that they cancel their debts by be- coming bankrupt. — Portsmouth Gazette.
  • 24. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. The Public Lauds. A bill having passed the last Congress for the distribution of the net proceeds of the sales of Public Lands among the several States, in the proportion of their federal representative numbers, it may be well to show the relative claims of the two sections. The following tables were prepared from official documents, in January, 1841. T.—COST OF THE PUBLIC LANDS. - Expenses. Louisiana purch. prin. and int. Florida purchase, prin. and int. Georgia and Yazoo, Survey and management, Indian treaties, Total, FREE Dollars. 23,529,353 6',489,768 5,532,151 9,119,417 85,148,203 STATES per ct. 8 45 32 Amount. 1,882,348 4,103,737 27,247,425 SLAVE STATES. per ct. Amount. 80 18,823,482 100 6,489,768 100 5,532,151 55 5,010,679 64 54,494,850 $134,229,375 25 33,233,510 67 90,350,930 It appears, then, that of the 134 millions of dollars which the public lands in the States and Territories have cost, 33 millions are chargeable to the free states, and 90 millions to the slave states. The 178,616,672 acres of land in the free states cost $33,233,510, or 19 cents per acre, while the 182,524,002 acres in the slave states cost $90,350,930, or 50 cents per acre. There is no justice, therefore, in dividing with the slave states, until the prodigious difference in the cost of their igmds and ours is equalized in some way or other. But the next table will show the slight prospect there is that this will ever be done. It gives the quantity of land originally owned by the United States, the quantity sold in the several States, north and south, the aggregate value, the price per acre in each State and in each section of country, and the quantity remaining unsold, January 1, 1841. II.—SALES OF PUBLIC LANDS. FREE STATES. States. Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Total, Acres. 24,810,246 23,459,619 35,941,902 40,050,832 47,271,241 7,082,832 178,616,672 Sold. pr ct sold. 12,965,782 52 15,280,406 67 11,749,458 30 9,185,720 23 1.915,793 4 1,069,255 15 2952,166,414 Value. $22,503,231 19,478,231 14,723,451 11,557,400 2,448.043 1,504',576 Per Acre. $1.73 1.27 1.25 1.26 1.27 1.41 $72,214,932 $1.38 105,923,258 Unsold. 1,747,258 4,274,700 18,646,960 29,885,315 45,355,448 6,013,577 SLAVE STATES. States. Alabama, _ Mississippi, Louisiana, Missouri, Arkansas, Florida, Acres. 31,699,470 21,920,786 20,437,559 40.241,436 31^468,911 36,755,840 Sold. 10,471,784 9,563,097 3,040,222 7,841,659 2,585,234 927,240 Total, Grand Total, 182,524,002 361,140,674 37,429,236 89,595,650 pr ct Value. sold. 33 $16,907,940 44 12,929,286 14 3,880,255 19 9,749,305 8 3,148,630 2 1,113,483 20 47,728,899 24 119,943,831 Per Acre $1.67 1.35 1.27 1.24 1.22 1.20 Unsold. 19,863,853 .11,524,128 16,783,547 31,186,358 27,906,780 35,828,600 1. 27i 143,093,266 1.341249,016,525 per ct. unsold 7 18 52 74 95 85 59 per ct. unsold 62 52 82 77 88 97 78 69
  • 25. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. This table shows, that while the lands of the north have produced, on an average, 138 cents per acre, those of the south have averaged only 127 cents ; that the aggre* gate value of lands sold in the free state* is $72,214,932, while the aggregate ol the slave states is only $47,728,899 : that while the northern lands have already yielded 218 per cent, of their cost, making a balance in their favor of $38,981,422, the southern lands have yielded but 63 per cent, of their cost, leaving a balance against ihem of $42,622,031, showing a money difference between the two parties of more than 80 millions of dollars. The next table will show, by contrast, the comparative growth of the two sec- tions at the present time ; from which it will appear evident that the inequality is continually becoming greater, and that while the growth of the free states advances in an increased ratio, that of the slave states is yearly lessening in proportion. I.-—FREE STATES. Years. 1833 1834 1835 1836 Total 4 years Per cent, of orig. quant'y, 1837 1838 1839 1840 Total 4 years Per cent, of orig. quant'y, Per cent, of unsold now, Total 8 years Pr. ct. of uns. Years. 1833 1834 1835 1836 Total 4 years Ohio 551,153 478,847 661,435 1,282,991 Indiana. 554,681 673,656 1 ,586,904 3,245,344 2,974,426 12 6,060,585 26 470,420 243,095 242,444 28,952 984,911 56 3,959,337 227 1,249,817 602,424 618,748 121,704 Illinois. 360,240 354,013 2,096,629 3,199,708 6,010,590 17 1,012,849 778,560 1,132,876 412,837 2,592,693 11 60 8,653,278 202 Michi'n. 447,780 512,760 630,027 4,189,823 5,780,390 14 3,337,122 9 18 9,347,712 51 773,522 97,533 134,984 25,862 1,031,901 6,812,291 17 Wisk'n. 217,543 646,133 863,676 178,783 87,256 650,722 135,356 Iowa. 274,605 298,152 496,498 1,052,117 1,069,255 2 15 IS 1,915,7931,065,255 4| 18 Total. 1,913,854 2,019,276 5,192,538 12,563,999 21,689,667 12 3,685,391 2,084,473 3,077,926 1,221,209 10,068,999 10 II.—SLAVE STATES. Alabama. Missy ppi. 451,319 1,121,494 1,072,457 1,064,054 1,587,007 2,931,181 1,901,409 2,023,709 Per cent, of orig. quant'y 1837 1838 1839 1840 Total 4 years Per cent, of orig. quant'y Per cent, of unsold now, Total 8 years Pr. ct. of uns. 5,012,192 7,140,438 16 381,773 159,969 121,935 56,298 719,975 5,732,167 29 33 556,354 371,074 17,787 19,621 864,836 ^,005,274 67 LouisVa. 89,441 82,570 325,955 879,456 Missouri 226,285 253,791 662,180 1,655,687 1,377,422 2,797,943 230,9521 663,987 164,178 510,423 509,307 1,038,065 198,761 1,103,198 2,867,067 8 2,480,620 14 654,592 5,665,010 17 Arkans. 41,859 149,756 630,027 963,535 1,785,177 281,915 156,971 154,858 120,524 714,268 2 2,499,445 Florida. 11,970 16,309 48,364 87,071 163,714 100,725 68,814 56,499 38,920 264,958 428,772 1 31,758,666 30 Total. 1,942,368 2.638,937 6,184,714 7,510,867 18,196,8S6 11 2,215,706 1,331,429 1,898,451 1,088,716 6,534,302 3 24,731,188 11
  • 26. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. From this it appears, that during the years 1833—6, called the years of specula- tion, the free states and territories sold 12 per cent, of their original lands, and the slave states and territories sold 11 per cent. In the four years of re-action follow- ing, the free states sold six per cent, and the slave states three per cent, of their original contents. But if we compare their sales respectively with the quantities of land now remaining unsold, we find that the free states sold in the last four years 10 per cent, of the amount, while the slave states in the same years sold but four per cent. Iu the eight years subsequent to 1832, the free states sold a quantity equal to 30 per cent, of the amount now remaining, or about one-quarter of what was unsold at the end of the year 1832, while the sales in the slave states in the same time equalled but 11 per cent, of the quantity now remaining, or less than one- tenth of what was unsold at the end of 1832. In the year 1838, which is regarded as about an average year, the free states, excluding territories, sold three per cent, of their lands, and the slave states only one per cent. Of the sales in the slave states since 1836, amounting to 5,478,792, more than one half, 2,867,067 acres were sold iu the state of Missouri, nearly all, I believe, to free laborers, goiug therefore to hasten the period of revolution in that state, while it also shows that the future resources of the country in the public lands depend mainly on free labor. The land sold by Government in the free states may be regarded as all bought for cultivation, and exceeds by more than five millions the quantity now under cultiva- tion in the United Kingdom. The sales in the last eight year's are 31,758,666 acres, being only two and a quarter millions less than the land now cultivated in the island of Great Britain. Of this quantity, 10,06S,999 acres, or 31 per cent., were sold in the last four years, since the season of speculation was over ; which fact, taken in connection with the vast influx of emigration during the preceding four years, conclusively proves that a much smaller proportion of the land sales of that remarkable period, in these states, were- taken for speculation than is generally supposed. At the rate of sales of the whole eight years, the lands in these states would be entirely disposed of in less than twenty years ; and at the rate of the last four years, the whole would be sold in seventy-two years. The running down of the sales in the slaveholding country since the credit bubble burst, is very instructive, falling from seven and a-half millions in 1836, to a trifle over one million in 1840, and of that amount more than 60 per cent, was in Missouri, chiefly to free cultivators. The sales in the two new territories of the north, one of which began to be settled in 1835, and the other in 1838, showing in the whole but little over 54 millions of acres, exceed by 13 per cent, the sales in the whole south, (leaving out Missouri,) containing three times the quantity of land. We call upon the new states of the north-west to look where they will be twenty years hence, when their public lands will be nearly all sold, and the avails put into the national treasury, and divided among all the states, or expended for the com- mon benefit, while the new states of the south-west will be dragging along, at about one per cent, a-year, and will still have a hundred and twr enty millions of acres under mortgage to pay one-half the proceeds to the Federal Government. Do you think they will be quiet ? No, certainly, here will be another source of con- tention between the north and the south, and another nullification war. Let us avoid, as far as possible, the multiplication of causes of controversy with the south, so that both they and we may be able to give undivided attention to the GREAT QUESTION. The effect of adopting the federal numbers as the basis of distribution, instead of the free population, may be seen by comparing the two columns in the census table for 1S40, marked Land Division and Free Division. The table is calculated upon a distribution of three millions annually. By adopting the federal basis, the slave states receive $190,496 more, and the free states $173,644 less, than equity allows, making a difference of $364,140. By taking this property basis, Maryland receives first a gratuity of one representative in Congress, and then a further gratuity of $3,260 yearly in money from the national treasury. The two adjoining states of Indiana and Kentucky, are now equal in political power—but of this public dona- tion, each free inhabitant of Kentucky will receive 22.2 cents and each free inhab- itant of Indiana but 18.8 cents. Perhaps it is a conceded point in all the west, that 100 Kentuckians are equal in merit to 118 Hoosiers. __-.
  • 27. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. American Wheat and English Corn Laws. Within a few months, the attention of philanthropists, on both sides of the At- lantic, has been drawn to a consideration of the English Corn Laws, as connected with the abolition of slavery in the United States. The only article of American production which Great Britain receives free from burdensome duties, is cotton, the growth of the Slave States, while grain, the growth of the free States, is burdened with heavy duties. Would she allow an open trade in grain, it would help the growth of the new states of the North West, and throw the whole influence of trade and of politics, in this country, into the hands of freemen, and in favor of free labor. The British corn law, as settled in 1828, by the act of 9 Geo. IV., c. 60, is one of the most ingeniously contrived schemes that can well be imagined, calculated to in- jure the grain-growing interests of other countries, and the grain-consuming portions of her own people, without, it is believed, a corresponding advantage to the agricul- tural interests, for whose benefit it was intended. The variable scale of duties, ris- ing as the price of grain falls, and falling as the price rises, is but little understood in this country. The " general average," as it is called, is declared every Thurs- day, at the exchequer; and is obtained by first finding the average of all the grains sold during the week ending on the preceding Saturday, at 150 of the principal towns and markets, and then taking an average of this with the five last preceding general averages ; and this last is the declared or general average for that week. When the declared average of wheat is 73s. or upwards per quarter of 8 bushels, the duty is Is.; and when the price is 52s. or under, the duty is 34s. 8d. ; the intermediate duties be- ing graduated by a scale, or tariff, as follows : TABLE, Showing the duty on foreign wheat, by the variable scale established by the English corn-law of 9 Geo. IV. c. 60, passed July 25, 1828, with the corresponding duty on flour per barrel of 196 lbs. in sterling money and its equivalent in Federal curren- cy, and the rate per cent, of the duty. Average price per quarter. If52s. and under 53s. 53 54 55 56 57 5S 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 64 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 73 and upwards Duty per Duty per quarter. barrel. s. d. 34 8 33 8 32 8 31 8 2s 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 IS 16 13 10 6 2 1 s. d. 20 10* 20 3 19 8. 19 Oh 18 5£ 17 104 17 3 16 13 16 Oi 15 5i 14 10* 14 3 21 10 01 8 2f 6 5 4 04 1 % 1i Duty in Fede- ral currency. $5 05 4 " 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 90 76 61 47 32 17 02 87 3 73 3 59 3 45 3 29 Rate per cent, of duty. 15 01 71 42 08 55 97 3S 14 66.6 65. 61.1 57.5 54.7 52. 49.4 46.9 44.4 42. 40.4 37.7 35.4 33.3 31.3 27.8 24.4 19.9 15.2 9.2 3.7 1.3 The attempt to overrule the great and irreversible laws of trade, which strike the balance between demand and supply— or, in other words, to prevent fluctuations in
  • 28. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. a market where the demand was constant and the supply variable—could not but fail. Twenty years ago it was considered that a deficiency of one-tenth in the har- vest would raise the price or wheat three-tenths, and a deficiency of one-third would treble the price. This thermometrical sensitiveness of the market increases, as the increase of population overpasses the increase of production. The yearly consump- tion of all kinds of grain in Great Britain is estimated at 52 million quarters, equal to 416 millions of bushels, or 15 bushels to eaeh inhabitant ; of which 13 millions of quarters, or 104 million bushels, being 3f bushels to each inhabitant, is wheat. The only country to which she can look, with advantage, for supplies, is the free North West. Here is at once an immense market for manufactures, and an unlimited capa- city for the production of wheat in return. The grain crop of the North West, in 1839, showing the whole product of wheat, of Indian corn, and of all other kinds of grain, in the six Northwestern States, with the proportion to each inhabitant, with quantity in the whole United States. To each To each iTo each Total to States. Wheat. inhabi- Indian inhabi- Other grain. inhabi- each inha- tant. corn. tant. tant. bitant. Bushels. Bushels Bushels. Bushels Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. Ohio 16,292,951| 10.7 33,954,162 22.4 15,684,492 10.3 43.4 Indiana - 4,154,256, 6 2,740,380 5.6 28,008,051 40.9 6,078,229 8.8 55.7 Illinois - 22,116,627 45.4 4,S06,877 9.8 60.8 Michigan 1,899,289 9 2,215,787 10.5 3,938,486 18.6 38.5 Wiskonsan Iowa 154,737 3.6 1,326,241 30.9 227,118 5.2 39.8 Total, 25,241,607 8.6 87,620,868, 29.8 29,735,202 10 48 U. States* 75,995,787 5 301,947,658 20 139,273,993 9 34.4 There is a great increase since, in the North West. The Hon. Henry W. Taylor, of Michigan, estimates the disposable surplus of wheat in that State alone, for the year 1841, at from two to two and a half million bushels, and he says the present po- pulation would easily raise five million bushels for sale if there was a steady mar- ket. Growth of the North West. Population of the six new States of the North West in the years 1810, 1820, 1830, and 1840, with the increase per cent, in each period often years. States. 1810. 1820. Increase per cent. 1830. Increase per cent. 1840. Increase per cent. Ohio, 230,760 581,434 152 937,675 61 1,515,695 61.5 Indiana, 24,520 147,178 500 341,582 132 683,314 100 Illinois, 12,282 55,21 1 349 157,575 185 486,173 208 Michigan, 4,762 8,896 87 28,600 222 211,705 640 Wiskonsan* 2,660 — 30,692 1,054 Iowa* — . — 202 — 85 43,117 — Total, 262,324 792,719 1,468,092 2,970,696 102 * In 1838 Wiskonsan had 18,149 inhabitants ; and Iowa had 22,859. Consequent- ly, Wiskonsan gained, in two years, 12,430, or 69 per cent, j and Iowa gained, in two years, 20,358, or 90 per cent. J ^^^
  • 29. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. Suppose England would agree to receive our wheat free of duty. Orders would be sent from this country for manufactures, that would set every wheel, and spindle, and hammer in motion. Immediately, the north-west states would be willing to tax themselves for the interest of the state debt, because they would see how taxes could be paid. Immediately the state stocks would rise, because the interest would be secured, with a certainty that the public works would be completed and ren- dered productive. The free manufacturing industry of England, and the free agri- cultural industry of the north-west, would be stimulated to the highest productive- ness, by the best of all encouragements—the hope of a fair reward. The demand for the public lands would pour a steady stream into the national treasury on the one hand ; to be met by a deeper current from the imports on the other, furnishing an adequate revenue for the completion of our harbor works and national defences. Our exports, no longer confined to a single staple raised by slaves, but drawn from the most productive of all branches of labor—the cultivation, by free hands, of a rich soil that costs next to nothing—would keep foreign ex- changes in a healthy state 5 new ties of mutual advantage, and new inducements to mutual justice, forbearance, and peace, would arise between two nations of common origin, from whose influence the world has so much to hope for ; our own manufac- tures would be left, under their present protection, to a healthy and natural growth with the growth of the country ; and our nation would be saved from another tariff controversy, to occupy and embitter the debates of another political generation. A Terrible Deed. In illustrating the desperate condition to which the lower classes in England are reduced through grinding poverty and scarcity of food, the London correspondent of the Boston Post relates the following occurrence, the bare perusal of which makes the blood run cold ; he says, however, that it is too well authenticated to be doubted. " One of the rules of the < Stockport Burial Society ' is, that if a member loses a child by death, the parents receive j£3 8s. 6d. for funeral expenses. At the late Chester Assizes, two married couples, whose average ages were only twenty-six, were indicted. Their names were Sandys—and one couple were charged with having administered arsenic to their child, by which they murdered it, and the others were charged with being accessories to the crime before and after the fact. The deceased, with whose murder they were accused, was thus awfully killed for the diabolical purpose of obtaining the sum of three pounds eight-and-sixpence from the Stockport Burial Society I" The Difference.—It is estimated that the English Corn Laws cause 20,000 deaths annually, and the American Slave Laws 25,000. Which is worse ? The Spirit of Liberty. Soon after the close of the long French war in Europe, a boy was standing on one of the bridges that cross the Thames at London, with a number of small birds in a cage for sale. A sailor who was passing, observed the little prisoners fluttering about the cage, peeping through the wires, and manifesting their eager desire to obtain their liberty. He stood for some time looking at the birds, apparently lost in thought. At length, addressing the boy, he said, — " How much do you ask Tor your birds ?" u Sixpence a piece, sir," was the reply. " I don't ask how much apiece," said the sailor j " how much for the lot f I want all hands." The boy began his calculations, and found they came to six shillings and sixpence. " There is your money," said the sailor, handing out the cash, which the boy received with evident satisfaction at his morning's trade. No sooner was the bar- gain settled, than the sailor opened the cage door, and let the birds fly away. The boy, looking quite astonished, exclaimed, " What did you do that for, sir? See, you have lost all your birds now." 1" I'll tell you why I did it," said the sailor. 1 1 was shut up three years in a French prison, as a prisoner of war, and I am resolved never to see anything in a prison that I can make free."
  • 30. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. The Cedar Tree. Those abolitionists who have entered systematically upon the political warfare against slavery, have adopted for their emblem the Cedar of Lebanon. The print below, taken from the Pictorial Bible, is said to be an exact picture of one of these venerable trees, supposed to have stood from the days of King David. " The Righteous shall grow like a Cedar of Lebanon. — Psalm xcii. 12. THE CEDAR OF LEBANON. The Cedar is the emblem of Constancy, of Protection, of Renown, of Immortality. " JAMES G. BIRNEY.—When the Hickory of Tennessee, the Elm of New York, the Buckeye of Ohio, and the Persimmon of Virginia, shall have perished into oblivion, our serviceable, fragrant, and ever-enduring CEDAR shall stretch its sheltering arms over the nation, and tower aloft, as a memorial of virtuous deeds, and a witness to the latest ages that God loves the good, and them that honor him he will honor." Song. A song of the towering Cedar Tree, The emblem of the free ; Here's glorious success to his tall, proud crest, May it shade the Buckeye tree ! He hath stood in the wintry tempest's blast, No trembling fear showed he ; But firm he stood as the storm howled past, With his strong arms branching free. Chorus.—Then sing to the brave old Cedar Tree, Who shall rule in this land ere long ; Here's health and renown to his broad green crownf When the Buckeye tree is gone.
  • 31. AMERICAN ANTI SLAVERY ALMANAC. He saw the dark age, when popular rage Was a saddening sight to see, And church and hall, both large and small, Were shut in the face of the free ; And the night throughout, the maddening shout Was heard of the drunken train ; They, the vile and the base, shall die in disgrace, But the Cedar shall remain. Chorus.—Then sing to the brave old Cedar Tree, Who shall rule in this land so long ; Here's health and renown to his broad green crown, When the Buckeye tree is gone. Political Principles. The Anti-Slavery Almanac for 1839, which obtained universal currency among abolitionists in that day, laid down the principle as an axiom, " We will vote for no man who votes against liberty !" The great National Convention, of August 1, 1S39, at Albany, adopted the fol- lowing resolutions : — 1. " Resolved, That we will neither vote for, or support the election of any man for President or Vice President of the United States, or for Governor or Lieutenant Governor, or any legislative office, who is not in favor of the immediate abolition of slavery. 2. " Resolved, That every abolitionist who has a right to vote, be earnestly en- treated to lose no opportunity to carry his abolition principles to the polls, and thereby cause our petitions to be heard through the medium of the ballot-box. The following pledge is now recommended by the New-York Central Committee to be circulated by town committees, for the purpose of ascertaining how many voters may be depended on in elections : Pledge.—The undersigned, legal voters of the town of , believing that slavery is the greatest political evil in this nation, and that while it continues we cannot hope for permanent prosperity, do agree to unite our political power for its peaceful and constitutional overthrow ; and we hereby pledge to each other and the world our sacred honor to vote for the candidates of the Liberty Party for executive and legislative offices whenever that party nominate men of good character and suitable qualifications ; and in case that party should fail to nominate such candi- dates, we agree to vote for such persons only as will go to the extent of their con- stitutional power for the immediate abolition of slavery. Necessity. One crime creates a necessity for another ; but this very necessity aggravates rather than justifies the guilt it produces. A case : The colored steward of a steam- boat hears a white man abuse his captain, and call him a miserable, trifling fellow. The steward gives him the lie—the white man strikes him, and is struck in return. The negro is taken up and sentenced to nine months' imprisonment, and the white man goes clear. " It is necessary," said the gentleman who told this—they could not get along in safety without such severity. Yes, it is necessary—and so, he that steals, finds it necessary to lie. Another case : —A minister of the gospel—we knew such a one—meek, pious, gentle, self-denying : he is a merciful master, and has been so educated that it never strikes him slavery is wrong. One of his negroes expresses his feelings in rather too manly a style, on being rebuked ; in o her words, is " impertinent." The mer- ciful man, the minister of Christ, draws off, and fells him to the earth with his fist. He never imagines that he is doing wrong—he sees that such acts are absolutely necessary, if he would maintain obedience among his slaves. Having once admitted the rightfulness of slavery, he must, by logical necessity, recognize as right what- ever is necessary to maintain it. If slaves are insolent, they must be whipped — else slavery must cease. If slaves run off, they must be whipped, stocked, or thumb-screwed, else slavery must cease.
  • 32. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. Strength of tlie North. The north has always had a majority in the U. S. House of Representatives. Year. 1789 1793 1803 1813 1819 1823 1833 1839 North. 35 57 77 103 105 124 141 142 South. 30 50 65 79 81 90 99 100 Maj. 5 7 12 24 24 34 42 42 In the Senate the north had a majority of two, (except from 1796 to 1802,) till 1812, when the admission of Louisiana equalized the representation in that body. Still the north, having power to choose the Vice President, may have the casting vote. It follows that every act of the nation is an act of the free nation. They are virtually the nation. Whatever Congress does, or refuses to do, the final responsi- bility rests upon the free states. The only way to absolve ourselves from the guilt and shame of our national crimes is to discard those who perpetrate them, and choose men to represent us who will not vote down the foundation principles of our government. After the new apportionment, which will take effect in 1842, the representation on a basis of 60,000 will be, north 154, south 97 ; north majority, 57. On the ad- mission of Iowa, Wisconsin, and Florida, which will doubtless take effect in 1843, it will be 156 to 98 ; north majority, 58. The Senate will then stand, north 30, south 28 ; north majority, 2. The electoral vote will then be, north 186, south 126 ; north majority, 60 ! " To the Polls." BY SUSAN Father ! in a happy home, Smiling when thy children come, Clustering around thy knee, Wilt thou have those children free? Have them, one day, firmly stand On their " own," their " native land," Never for a single hour, Helpless slaves of tyrant power ; Have the proffer'd gifts of heaven, Chainless hand,unbranded brow, Ever to thy loved ones given ? To the polls ! —secure them now. Husband ! who each passing year Provest thy chosen one more dear, Think of many a deep felt trial, Uncomplaining self denial ; Torturing cares in silence borne, Smiles of love, forever worn ; All her warm heart's pure affection, — Every claim on thy protection ! Be her breast to fear a stranger ! Though the threat'ning Southrons come, Guard her from approaching danger, To the polls ! —protect her home. Brother, with a parent's care ! He who filled that vacant chair, He who watched thy early years With a father's hopes and fears, Left a sacred charge to thee, — Blooming youth and infancy •' Guard that precious charge from wrong ! Threat'ning ills around them throng; Though a darkening cloud is o'er thee, Heed it not J—serenely bright Is the narrow path before thee, To the polls ! —support the right. Freemen ! would you still be free ? As ye prize j^our liberty, As you wish your sons may stand With unfettered soul and hand ; As ye feel for those who've borne Undeserved reproach and scorn ; As ye do not seek to find Heavier chains the slave to bind ; As ye will not, lowly kneeling, Bend your own necks to the chain — Oh ! by every generous feeling, To the polls ! —ne'er pause again. A Church Sorely Bitten. The committee of funds of Old School Presbyterians, lately reported, forty three thousand three hundred and fifty four dollars, exclusive of the funds invested in the Vicksburg bank—as having been lost by the depreciation in the value of stocks, chiefly in the South and South West. The amount sunk in the Vicksburg Bank is supposed to be very large. So much for church investments among those who trade in the souls and bodies of men.
  • 33. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. Relief for Sorrow. The following stanzas, by the late Rev. C. Wilcox, contain true philosophy, as well as poetry of surpassing beauty. Wouldst thou from sorrow find a sweet relief, Or is thy heart oppressed with woes untold? Balm wouldst thou gather for corroding grief? — Pour blessings round thee, like a shower of gold. Rouse to some word of high and holy love, And thou an angel's happiness shalt know — Shalt bless the earth, while in the world above : The good begun by thee shall onward flow, In many a branching stream, and wider grow ; The seed that in these few and fleeting hours, Thy hands unsparing and unwearied sow, Shall deck thy grave with amaranthine flowers, And yield the fruits divine, in heaven's immortal bowers. Education Maxims. The following maxims, from the Common School Almanac for 1842, will show where the strength and wealth and improvement of the country are found. Re- marks are added in brackets. Protection.—" Education," said Edmund Burke, " is the cheap defence of nations." [In the slave states, the mass of the people are uneducated, and the slave com- munity is unprotected.] Insurance.—Education is the great Insurance Company, which insures all other insurance companies. The safety of life and the security of property lie in the virtue and intelligence of the people ; for what force has law, unless there is intel- ligence to perceive its justice, and virtue to which that law can appeal. [Hence the insecurity of both life and property throughout the south, and the anxiety of slaveholders to remove their families and their capital to the north.] Agriculture.—The soil does not produce according to its natural richness, but according to the intelligence that works it. Therefore, the best manure farmers can obtain, is a good school for the district where their children are to receive the entire education. A good school will make the rich soil a blessing, and the barren one productive. [Who wonders that the soil of the south wears out, when " the intelligence that works it" is systematically reduced to the lowest possible degree ?] Government.—To govern men, there must be either Soldiers or Schoolmasters, Books or Bayonets, Camps and Campaigns, or Schools and Churches — the cartridge box or the ballot box. . • [The south is governed by the bowie knife and whip, and governs the north by the power of sectarian and party discipline.] Economy.—I would say, It is cheaper to educate the infant mind, than to sup- port the aged criminal. Yes, bestow the pence on common schools, and save the pounds on prisons. Man was not made to be sent to prison, but to be educated ; and " the very worst use you can put a man to is to hang him." [The next worst use of a man is to make him a slave ; for " Jove fix'd it certain that whatever day Makes man a slave, takes half his worth away." Unknown Laws.—The writer was once passing through a park and saw nailed to one of the trees, this warning : " All dogs found in this park will be shot." A friend who was with us, remarked, " unless dogs can read they are pretty badly off here." Now a man not able to read is worse off than the dog, for the dog has a master to read for him ; but man has no master between him and his God. [How dreadful the cruelty of making statutes, as is done in the slave states, to punish men who cannot read them, and how satanical the sacrilege of prohibiting man from learning to read the laws of his God.]
  • 34. AMERICAN ANTI SLAVERY ALMANAC. Fruits of Emancipation, The liberality of the freed Christians in the West Indies, in contributing money from their scanty resources for the furtherance of the gospel, is most remarkable, and may well attract the attention of those managers of benevolent societies in the United States, who are courting the patronage of a handful of slaveholders, forgetful of the time to come, when three millions of emancipated Americans will throng with their gifts to the treasury of the Lord. The following anecdote, related by a minister from the West Indies, at a mis- sionary meeting in England, is copied from the London Chronicle : " You will perceive a considerable increase in the income of the station during the past year. That increase has been chiefly owing to a great effort which the people are now making towards a new chapel. In many instances I was obliged to restrain their liberality. One incident occurred which 1 shall never forget. In calling over the names, to ascertain how much they could give, I happened to call the name of " Fitzgerald. Matthew." " I am here, sir," he instantly replied, and at the same time, I saw him hobbling with his wooden leg out of the crowd, to come up to the table pew, where I was standing. I wondered what he meant, for the others answered to their names without moving from their places. I was, however, forcibly struck with his apparent earnestness. On coming up, he put his hand into one pocket, and took out a handful of silver wrapped in paper, and said, with a lovely kind of abruptness, " That's for me, massa." " Oh," said I, "keep your money at present, I don't want it now, I only wanted to know how much you could afford to give ; I will come for the money another time." " Ah massa," he replied, " God's work must be done, and 1 may be dead,'' and with that he plunged his hand into another pocket, and took out another handful of silver, and said, " That's for my wife, massa." Then he put his hand into a third pocket, and took out a some- what similar parcel, and said, " That's for my child, massa," and at the same time giving me a slip of paper, which somebody had written for him, to say how much the whole was. It was altogether near j£3 sterling—a large sum for a poor field negro with a wooden leg. But his expression was to me worth more than all the money in the world. 1 have heard eloquent preachers in England, and have felt, and felt deeply under their ministrations ; but never have I been so impressed with anything they have said, as with the simple expression of this poor negro. Let me never forget it ; let it be engraven on my heart ; let it be my motto in all that I take in hand for the cause of Christ—' God's work must be done, and I may be dead.' » Woman. Not she with trait'rous kiss her Saviour stung, Not she denied him with unholy tongue ; She, when apostles shrunk, could danger brave, Last at the Cross, and earliest at the grave. Public Opinion. Laws do not change opinion, but opinion changes Law. Public opinion is the Throne of a republic ; and it is eloquently and correctly said by M. de Tocqueville, that " the greatest despotism on earth is an excited, untaught public sentiment ; and hence, we should not only hate despots, but despotism." " When I feel the hand of unjust power, I care little to know who oppresses me ; the yoke is not easier, because it is held out to me by the hands of a million of men." The best means of correcting public sentiment, is to agitate it ; for " when thought is agitated truth rises." Therefore, let light, by means of the Press, and the living voice, be poured upon the public mind. We must agitate : for Reform, like a top, will fall as soon as we stop whipping. We have not only to strike while the iron is hot, but we must make the iron hot by striking.
  • 35. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. " They can't talte care of themselves." Two slaves in Louisiana were let nut by their master, at a considerable distance from his own residence. They were skilful, intelligent mechanics, and of course he obtained high wages for their work. What time remained after their daily al- lotted tasks were finished, they were allowed to have for themselves ; and these precious hours they employed most industriously, with the view of purchasing their freedom. When they had accumulated, by patient toil, a sum which they deemed sufficient, they endeavoured to negotiate with their master; but without success. Again they went to work ; and after two or three years, were enabled to offer a sum so large, that they felt almost certain it would tempt him to accede to their wishes. But he found them too profitable to be lightly parted with ; moreover, whatever they had of property was in reality his. He might, with perfect impunity, have taken all their hard-earned wages, and kept them in slavery still, as thousands of slaveholders had done before him. But whether he doubted their having so much money as they pretended, or whether he was too honorable to steal more than ninety- nine hundredths of their earnings, I know not ; at all events, he would not listen to their proposition on any terms. Finding they could not purchase liberty, they wisely resolved to take it. The enterprise was a perilous one ; for through a long line of slave States, they must run the gauntlet of patrols, blood-hounds, lynchers, jail-keepers, and rifles—and if they reached the States called free, they must dodge constables and kidnappers, backed by the glorious Constitution. They were sufficiently intelligent and well-informed to understand the dangers they would incur, and to devise a most cunning method of avoiding them. They made themselves acquainted with a white beggar and made him offers large enough to secure his secresy. They dressed him in a handsome suit of clothes, and through his agency purchased a carriage and a fine span of horses. They brought the carriage to an appointed place, stood hat in hand while he entered, and then mounted outside, as footman and groom. Of course no patrol thought of challen- ging such an equipage ; and a white gentleman travelling through the country, at- tended by his servants, was welcome at all the inns. The obsequiousness of their manners was an admonition to their brethren in bonds. " Yes, massa," and " Cer- tainly, massa," were accompanied with the most profound bows, and spoken in the humblest tones. The trio arrived in Buffalo unmolested ; there the carriage and horses were sold ; aDd the white beggar paid handsomely for consenting to play the gentleman. The slaves passed over to Victoria's dominions, whence they wrote a very friend- ly letter to their whilom master, begging that he would feel no uneasiness on their account, as they were most comfortably situated. — l. m. c. Southern Paymasters. At a late anti-slavery convention in Hamilton county, Ohio, S. P. Chase, Esq., said he had endeavored to ascertain the amount annually lost by the counties of Hamilton, Clermont, and Brown, through the inability of southern planters and merchants to pay their debts, contracted for produce and merchandise sold to them on credit from those counties, and that so far as he could find data, the sum teas equal to the taxes paid by those counties. The Hon. Thomas Morris confirmed this statement, and said moreover, that it was in reality greater than the amount of taxes thus paid. The daily professional business of these gentlemen is extending to all these counties, and they have every facility to ascertain the fact In looking over the June number of the Knickerbocker, we perceive the names of delinquent subscribers are published, with the sums that are due from each. The whole sum due from such subscribers in the number before us, is $173, of which sum $145 50 is due from southern subscribers, which is more than five-sixths of the whole. It is believed that there are ten numbers of the Knickerbocker taken at the north, where there is one at the south. If so, then we have indebted ess from the south about 60 to 1.
  • 36. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. Patriotism and its Reward, An Ohio paper gives the following piece of history, which may well make our Anglo-Saxon pride hide its head. " In the late American war with Great Britain, at the battle of Brownstone, in the year 1812, when the American soldiers were defeated and flying in every direc- tion from a savage foe, ensign Foster, of Williamsburg, Clermont county, discovered his friend, Capt.Boerstler, of the same place, wounded in the forehead with a small rifle ball, which had penetrated the skull, but had lodged on the dura mater. Cap- tain B. was sitting on a log, his horse killed, and he unable from his wound to make a retreat. At this moment Mr. B , who was slightly wounded in the wrist, came hurrying by on horseback, under the care of Col. , of the Chilicothe regi- ment. Ensign Foster, seeing this opportunity for the escape of his friend, Capt. Boerstler, seized him with herculean strength, and in an instant set him on the horse behind Mr. B . Mr. B. immediately became alarmed for his own safety, and began to cry, supposing the weight of the captain on his horse would retard his flight. Col. , who had the care of Mr. B., on seeing what had transpired, im- mediately drew his sword on Ensign Foster, who gave back, and Capt. Boerstler fell from the horse to the ground. At this moment, Capt. John, a man of color, the waiter of Gen. Finley, of Cincinnati, came in sight, making good his retreat oir a swift horse. On seeing the ignoble conduct of Col. and Mr. B., in refusing assistance to a wounded fellow soldier in the hour of danger, he became indignant, dismounted his horse at once, placed the captain in his saddle, and ensign Foster behind to assist him in securing his retreat, while he (Capt. John,) fled on foot. So the persons of whom I have spoken arrived safely at the fort. Capt. Boerstler, though his wound was not mortal, died in a short time, being killed by a drunken surgeon in attempting to extract the ball. All will be anxious to know what has become of Mr. B., and what has become of Capt. John. Mr. B.'s wound in the wrist being slight, he soon recovered, returned to his friends, by whom he was caressed and regarded as an honorable man, and a soldier who had braved the dangers of war, and fought the battles of his country. Nor did his country do him less honor. He has drawn a pension of ninety-six dollars per annum, to the amount of hundreds of dollars. He is now living in Clermont county, in the possessioff.of a good living, enjoying all the blessings of liberty. But where is Capt John, who so generously perilled his own life to save that of a fellow soldier? Did he return to his country crowned with military honors? He was denied a country. Was he pensioned by the General Government for his bravery on the battle field, and his generosity evinced in voluntarily giving up his own horse to save a fellow soldier, and trusting to his own fleetness for safety ? No He was one of those persons who, by the black acts of 1804 and 1807, are prohibited from settling in Ohio, unless they give a resident white security for their good behavior ! Ask a man to give security for his good behavior, who behaves himself as Capt. John did at the battle of Brownstown ! I In 18—, when the doctrine held and taught by the Colonization Society, that ne- groes are fit only for missionaries, had been extensively propagated and generally believed, the self-styled guardians of the liberties of the people, in true mobocratic style, drove Capt. John, with hundreds of others, out of Cincinnati. As Capt. John was on his way from Cincinnati to Canada, he called at Williamsburgh, where he had an interview with the surviving friends of Capt. Boerstler, who advised him to give security for his good behavior, &c, to which he replied, " I will give no security in a country where I have fought its battles and am not even suspected of crime." The Greatest Man. The greatest man is he who chooses the right with invincible resolution ; who resists the sorest temptations from within and from without ; who bears the heaviest burdens cheerfully ; who is calmest in storms, and most fearless under menaces and frowns ; whose reliance on truth, on virtue, on God, is unfaltering. — Channing.
  • 37. AMEBICAW ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC. Testimony from Jamaica. The Hon. Edward Jordon, of Kingston, Jamaica, is a magistrate, a member of the Provincial Assembly, and one of the editors of the leading daily Journal. His Eosition is conservative, rather leaning to the planting interest ; so much, that he as been denounced by the ultra-abolitionists of the island as recreant to liberty. In a letter to the Rev. C. S. Renshaw, dated May 5, 1841, he makes the following statements in regard to the effect of emancipation. You ask, " is there any manifest improvement in the physical and moral con ditions of the rural population generally." My answer is, I think there has been a very manifest improvement in the physical and moral condition of the rural popula- tion of the island. The transition from slavery and apprenticeship, to unrestricted freedom, has been productive of the best effects. The increased pecuniary means of the people, has led to their increased comfort and happiness. They are better fed, clothed, and lodged, than they were. They have more time for rest, and to attend to their religious duties. Marriage is becoming, or has become more gen- eral among them, and altogether the effects of religious instruction appear to me more evident, than at any previous period. It is impossible to contrast the present and the past condition of the people generally, without being struck with the aston- ishing change that has taken place for the better. " What are the causes of the great falling off in the island staples ?" The demand for high wages on the part of the newly emancipated, which the employers would not consent to pay, together with the disputes about rent of houses and grounds, prevented the available labor of the colony from being applied to the extent it otherwise would have been. These disputes had scarcely terminated, when the drought set in. To these circumstances I attribute the falling off, which has been very considerable. " Has property generally appreciated, or only when broken into small lots?" It is not only when broken into small lots that the value of property has increased. Estates in the country, and houses in the towns, have since the abolition sold readily, and at higher rates than were ever expected. This, however, was the result of a large amount of compensation money being brought into the colony for investment, as well as the increased confidence produced by emancipation. Be Faithful unto the End. A German, whose sense of sound was remarkably acute, was passing by a church, a day or two after he had landed in this country, and the sound of music attracted him to enter, though he had no knowledge of our language. The music proved to be a piece ol nasal psalmody, sung in a most discordant fashion ; and the sensitive German would fain have covered his ears. As this was scarcely civil, and might appear like insanity, his next impulse was to rush into the open air. " But this, too, I feared to do? " said he, " lest offence might be given ; so I resolved to en- dure the torture with the best fortitude I could assume j when, lo ! I distinguished amid the din, the soft, clear voice of a woman, singing in perfect tune. She made no effort to drown the voices of her companions, neither was she disturbed by their noisy discord ; but patiently and sweetly she sang in full, rich tones ; one after another yielded to the gentle influence ; and before the tune was finished, all were in perfect harmony." I have often thought of this story, as conveying an instructive lesson to reform- ers. The spirit that can thus sing patiently and sweetly in a world of discord, must indeed be of the strongest as well as the gentlest kind. Scarce can one hear his own voice amid the braying of a multitude ; and ever and anon comes the tempta- tion to sing louder than they, and drown the voices that cannot thus be forced into perfect time. But this were a pitiful experiment ; the melodious tones, cracked wto shrillness, would only increase the tumult. Stronger, and more frequently comes the temptation to stop singing, and let dis- cord do its own wild work. But blessed are they that endure to the end—singing patiently and sweetly, till all join in with loving acquiescence, and universal har- mony prevails, without forcing into submission the free discord of a single voice.' — Mrs. Child.
  • 38. AMERICAN ANTI SLAVERY ALMANAC. Principles of Christian. Fellowship. The Congregational Church in Canterbury, N. H., April 9, 1841, Resolved, That we cannot, conscientiously, extend the hand ^ r Chrsstian fellow- ship to churches that tolerate slaveholding in their members ; nor will we invite to our communion table, or into the pulpit, those who claim a right to hold property in man. , The Presbytery of Ripley, Ohio, May 7, 1841 , Resolved, That in the opinion of this Presbytery, the sin of slaveholding should be treated as any other sin, and therefore, that this Presbytery will not receive under its care, for the purpose of licensure, any person known to be guilty of this sin/ without satisfactory evidence of his having repented of it. And that ministers thus guilty, who may be received to this Presbytery by certificate from other Pres- byteries, be instructed, that we shall feel ourselves bound to pursue the same steps of labor and discipline, as in the case of any other similar offence ; and that the sessions of our churches be requested to act on the same principle in regard to the admission of members to their respective churches. The Baptist Association of Black River, N. Y., 1841, Resolved, That American slavery is sinful under all possible circumstances — essential ingredients are those flagrant violations of God's law and the rights of man which the Bible everywhere condemns, and- which, separate from slavery, everywhere exclude those who are guilty of them from the pale of the christian church. Resolved, Therefore, that to exclude slaveholders from the pulpit and the com- munion table, is^to institute no new " test "—that the test is as old as Christianity, and identical with its most legitimate workings aud its most commonly received practices. The General Anti-Slavery Convention in London, June, 1840, on motion of Rev. John Angell James, Resolved, That this meeting, while it disclaims the intention or desire of dictating to Christian communities the terms of their fellowship, respectfully submits that it is their incumbent duty to separate from their communion dll those persons, who, after they have been faithfully warned in the spirit of tke?gospel, continue in the sin of enslaving their fellow creatures, or holding them in slavery—a sin, by the com- mission of which, with whatever mitigating circumstances it maybe attended in their own particular instance, they give the support of their example to the whole system of compulsory servitude, and the unutterable horrors of the slave trade. What has become of that Leather 1 An industrious and careful citizen of the North, a tanner by trade, was arguing with an abolitionist, that he had no concern with slavery. Abol. How much did you lay up last year ? Tan. You know I could not lay up a great deal, I lost so much. Abol. How came you to lose so much ? Tan. I sold fifteen hundred dollars worth of leather to Mr. , the carriage- maker, on credit, and he failed, and I lost the debt. Abol. How came Mr. lb fail? He has been considered a very industrious man and a good manager, neither intemperate nor extravagant? Tan. You know he sells his carriages chiefly at the South, where they always have to give long credits, and for four or five years it has been so difficult to collect debts in Mississippi and Alabama, and the exchanges have been so bad, that it has used up all his capital, profits, credit; and everything, and he can't pay me a cent for my leather. Abol. But what makes it so difficult to collect debts at the South? Why don't they work harder and live closer, when it comes hard times, as we do, and so pay up ? Tan. I see what you are driving at. It is all owing to slavery. I understand now, that the fifteen hundred dollars is my tax for this year to support slavery. Abol. Just so.

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