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Assistive technology in libraries
 

Assistive technology in libraries

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    Assistive technology in libraries Assistive technology in libraries Presentation Transcript

    • ADAPTIVE/ASSISTIVETECHNOLOGY AND DISABILITY IN THE LIBRARY
    • What is Assistive Technology? The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) defines assistive technology as “any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability.” (Assistive Technology: 10 Things to Know)
    • What is Assistive Technology? Assistive technology (AT) can be low-, mid-, or high-tech. Low-tech:  magnification sheets, color coding, large print materials, removable highlighter tape  assistance to students with reading and organizational difficulties Mid-tech:  tape recorders, audio books, headphones, visual timers  assist students who need reading and task completion support High-tech (computer-based):  Text-to-speech software assists students with reading difficulties and visual impairments.  Concept-mapping software is a helpful resource for visual learning, planning, and collaboration.  Computer input alternatives, such as computer switches, trackballs, and speech recognition technologies, help support users with mobility impairments or other disabilities.  Scanners with optical character recognition and computers with text reading software allow students with reading and vision disabilities to convert print materials to electronic text (e- text) for translation to synthetic speech. (TITLE: Assistive Technology: 10 THINGS TO KNOW SOURCE: Library Media Connection 25 no1 Ag/S 2006PAGE(S): 12-14)
    • How does this apply to web browsing? World Wide Web Consortium established the Web Accessibility Initiative in 1999 Universal usability accounts for users of all ages, experience levels, and physical or sensory limitations; as well as limitations of their equipment and platforms. Center for Universal Design: 4 principles:  Equitable Use: “The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities. Provide the same means of use for all users: identical whenever possible; equivalent when not.” Text equivalents  Flexibility in Use: choice in method  Simple and Intuitive Use: cut out a lot of advertising and bells and whistles  Perceptible Information: can be perceived by sight or sound
    • Who might need assistive technology in order to use the library? Hearing impaired
    • Who might need assistive technology in order to use the library? Hearing impaired Visually impaired
    • Who might need assistive technology in order to use the library? Hearing impaired Visually impaired Physical handicap
    • Who might need assistive technology in order to use the library? Hearing impaired Visually impaired Physical handicap Cognitive disability
    • Who might need assistive technology in order to use the library? Hearing impaired Visually impaired Physical handicap Cognitive disability Elderly
    • Hearing Impaired http://www.nypl.org/help/community- outreach/services-for-persons-with-disabilities ASL story hour Community outreach TTY (text telephone)
    • Hearing Impaired Infrared Assistive Listening Device: Amplifies sound Induction Loop Assistive Listening Device  Removes background noise, reverberation Closed captioning on media Video Relay Service
    • Visually Impaired http://www.nypl.org/help/community-outreach/services-for- persons-with-disabilities LOC: National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) http://www.loc.gov/nls/ JAWS (speech synthesizer and Braille) Texthelp (can read or compose written or onscreen text) Zoom and MAGic (enlarge/enhance text) Audio-described videos Dragon (takes dictation to type document) Newsline (news read aloud by synthesized voice over the phone every day) SyncBraille keyboard Web-Braille Digital talking books (DTB) on USB flash-drives
    • Physical Disability http://www.nypl.org/help/community- outreach/services-for-persons-with-disabilities Wheelchair access http://www.dclibrary.org/services/adaptiveservices L-STAR (deliver library materials to person’s home) Books by Mail NLS Madentec Tracker Softype QPointer Hands Free Alternative Mice (TrackBall) Adapted keyboards, switches
    • Cognitive http://www.ius.edu/Library/adaptech.cfm Co:Writer (flexible spelling for those with dyslexia or phonetic problems)
    • Elderly L-STAR Books by Mail NLS
    • Discussion Questions What is assistive technology? Who needs assistive technology? Has anyone been to a library that has some of these technologies? What other services could libraries provide in future? How is Universal Usability related to assistive technology? How could these technologies help a user surf the web?