Webinar: Sharing Statements a Collaborative Project

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In theory, any two LRSs should be able to communicate with one another, but does it work in practice? Recently, Rustici Software, Saltbox and HT2 collaborated on a project to find out.

Join Andrew Downes from Rustici Software and Ali Shahrazad from Saltbox to find out how this project worked and the lessons we learned from the experience. We’ll also explore the benefits of sharing statements to you and your organization, and the different technical methods of achieving statement sharing, beyond the methods we used in our experiment.

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  • Sharing statements between LRS is an important concept.
    We wanted to test the spec and our LRS to make sure it worked in practice.
    We also want to share our challenges and successes with the wider community.
    This required collaboration! Sharing Statements between LRS by the same vendor is no big deal.
  • In this example, Learning Locker has been integrated into Moodle such that Moodle launches the Golf Example prototype and Statements from Moodle and the Golf Example are sent to Learning Locker. These are forwarded on to Watershed.

    At the same time, Statements from the Bookmarklet are sent to Wax LRS. As Wax and Watershed are linked, Statements from the Golf Example are passed on to Wax and Statements from Bookmarklet are passed to Watershed.

    Moodle then pulls all statements from Watershed (including those that came via Wax) and displays them to the learner as an activity stream.

    We have a screencast that shows this in practice.
  • In this example, Learning Locker has been integrated into Moodle such that Moodle launches the Golf Example prototype and Statements from Moodle and the Golf Example are sent to Learning Locker. These are forwarded on to Watershed.

    At the same time, Statements from the Bookmarklet are sent to Wax LRS. As Wax and Watershed are linked, Statements from the Golf Example are passed on to Wax and Statements from Bookmarklet are passed to Watershed.

    Moodle then pulls all statements from Watershed (including those that came via Wax) and displays them to the learner as an activity stream.

    We have a screencast that shows this in practice.
  • In this example, Learning Locker has been integrated into Moodle such that Moodle launches the Golf Example prototype and Statements from Moodle and the Golf Example are sent to Learning Locker. These are forwarded on to Watershed.

    At the same time, Statements from the Bookmarklet are sent to Wax LRS. As Wax and Watershed are linked, Statements from the Golf Example are passed on to Wax and Statements from Bookmarklet are passed to Watershed.

    Moodle then pulls all statements from Watershed (including those that came via Wax) and displays them to the learner as an activity stream.

    We have a screencast that shows this in practice.
  • Our first attempt was to configure the LRSs with no configuration. This had some success but there were a lot of issues!

    After we fixed the issues, we tried again. It worked perfectly!

    Details of the issues we hit are in the white paper and will be outlined in a webinar in late April/early May.

    Email us for the white paper and screencast (addresses on next slide)
  • In this example, Learning Locker has been integrated into Moodle such that Moodle launches the Golf Example prototype and Statements from Moodle and the Golf Example are sent to Learning Locker. These are forwarded on to Watershed.

    At the same time, Statements from the Bookmarklet are sent to Wax LRS. As Wax and Watershed are linked, Statements from the Golf Example are passed on to Wax and Statements from Bookmarklet are passed to Watershed.

    Moodle then pulls all statements from Watershed (including those that came via Wax) and displays them to the learner as an activity stream.

    We have a screencast that shows this in practice.
  • Webinar: Sharing Statements a Collaborative Project

    1. 1. Sharing Statements: a Collaborative Project Andrew Downes andrew.downes@tincanapi.com hello@learninglocker.net Ali Shahrazad ali.shahrazad@saltbox.com
    2. 2. Today’s webinar Benefits of sharing statements to L&D and the business Our collaborative project: what we did and what happened Technical background: how it all works Time for questions
    3. 3. Benefits Ali Shahrazad ali.shahrazad@saltbox.com
    4. 4. Handset & Service Sales e-Observation Forms Feature & Benefit Scavenger Hunt LMS #2 (partner sales) LMS #1 (retail/B2B) Role Play Guides (forms) Business Intelligence FAQ sheets (intranet) Social Business Community A Sales Trainer’s Story Formal training not enough Custom mobile app Online resources Leadership engagement Business outcomes
    5. 5. Handset & Service Sales Observation Forms Feature & Benefit Scavenger Hunt (mobile app) LMS #2 (partner sales) LMS #1 (retail/B2B) Role Play Guides (forms) BI Reporting Tool FAQ sheets (intranet) Social Business Community A Sales Trainer’s Story Invested a bunch of money & time
    6. 6. Handset & Service Sales Observation Forms Feature & Benefit Scavenger Hunt (mobile app) LMS #2 (partner sales) LMS #1 (retail/B2B) Role Play Guides (forms) BI Reporting Tool FAQ sheets (intranet) Social Business Community A Sales Trainer’s Story IT Business Analyst (reporting & integration)
    7. 7. Pain Points What if we had a new analyst or LMS? Expensive to manually integrate applications Business analysts don’t scale well I wasn’t the only one. Multiple regions Content/apps didn’t exchange information Sometimes took 4-6 weeks to get reporting
    8. 8. Why Statement Sharing? Organisation LRS Vendor LRS LRSs owned by different stakeholders LMS External LRS LRS Getting data out of (or into) an LMS New LRS Old LRS Migrating to a new system Some Other System LRS Pushing data to another non-LRS system LRSLRS LRS LRSLRS LRS An organisation has multiple LRS.
    9. 9. What we did Andrew Downes andrew.downes@tincanapi.com
    10. 10. Project background Four main goals: ● Test the specification ● Test our LRSs ● Promote collaboration ● Promote the concept
    11. 11. Step 1: Initial Investigation
    12. 12. Step 1: Initial Investigation
    13. 13. Step 1: Initial Investigation
    14. 14. It sort of worked... ● Statements went to all the places they were supposed to! But... ● The two way syncing only worked 1 way at a time! ● Some statements always failed. ● The system had to be reset after each batch of statements. We had some work to do...
    15. 15. Step 2: Things to fix ● Developers worked independently on each LRS (no communication between them) ● Improvements were proposed for the specification and conformance suite. ● I fixed some issues with the Golf Prototype Time to try again...
    16. 16. Step 3: Final proof of concept E-learning course (Golf example) Bookmarklet Launched Statements displayedTracked Tracked Statements queried Statements queried Statements pushed LMS
    17. 17. It worked!
    18. 18. Golf example statements...
    19. 19. Bookmarklet statements...
    20. 20. Lessons Learnt ● The spec is robust ● Interoperability is hard ● Sharing statements is not the hard bit! ● Pushing is better than pulling
    21. 21. How it works
    22. 22. Six ways to share One LRS pushes statements to another LRS LRS One LRS queries (pulls) Statements from another LRS LRS Two way sharing (both LRS push or pull) LRS LRS Two way sharing (one LRS pushes and pulls) LRS LRS Man-in-the-middle LRS LRS Statement sharing tool Download and upload Statements as a file LRS LRS JSON file
    23. 23. One Way Sharing ● All statements in the first LRS sent to the second. ● Statements do not go the other way. ● Useful for a central LRS collecting from multiple sources or migrating LRS. ● The pushing/pulling LRS plays the role of an activity provider sending or retrieving statements.
    24. 24. Two Way Sharing ● All statements from each LRS are shared with the other. ● Useful for systems that need to be kept in sync.
    25. 25. Man-in-the-middle application ● Stand alone application specifically for moving statements around ● Doesn’t store statements itself ● Doesn’t exist as a product today (aka Statement Piping)
    26. 26. Download and upload ● Useful for one-off batches ● Direct connection between LRS not required ● Useful for backup and migration
    27. 27. How does the spec ensure interoperability? ● Common data structure. Statements have a defined set of properties. ● Common data transfer mechanism, Statements are sent and received in the same way. ● Special rules for handling conflicting and duplicate statements; allows for two way sharing.
    28. 28. Not just statements There’s other types of data to consider sharing: ● Canonical activity definitions ● Documents e.g. bookmarking data ● Person information
    29. 29. Poll: Which are you most interested in? ● Getting data from many sources into an LRS for analytics. ● Pushing data about e-learning courses into another system. ● Migrating all of my learning data into a new LRS.
    30. 30. Next steps

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