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Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
Stages of negotiations2
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Stages of negotiations2

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Stages of typical crisis negotiation

Stages of typical crisis negotiation

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  • 1. Stage of Crisis Negotiations Russ Lescault 2010
  • 2. Objectives
    • Handling hostage/non-hostage situations
    • Maintaining control of crisis situation
    • Becoming a better listener
    • Communicating with the mentally ill
    • Understanding basic negotiation techniques
  • 3. Hostage
    • A person being held and threatened by a subject to force the fulfillment of substantive demands on a third party. A person held as security for fulfillment of certain terms .
  • 4. Hostage Situations
    • Goal oriented
    • Substantive demands
    • Involve purposeful behavior
    • Requires police to facilitate demands
    • Meeting demands is primary goal – not harming the hostages
    • Keeping hostages alive prevents tactical response by police
  • 5. Hostage Situations
    • Hostages aren’t necessarily people
    • National monuments
    • Weapons storage areas
    • Businesses and utilities
    • Government centers
  • 6. HOBAS Information Chesterfield County Police Lt Russ Lescault
  • 7. Non-Hostage Situations
    • Negotiations with a subject to return him/her to a state of emotional and psychological equilibrium.
  • 8. HOBAS Information
  • 9. Non-Hostage Situations
    • Emotional, senseless, or self-destructive
    • Lack substantive demands or have unrealistic demands
    • No escape demands
    • Absence of rational thinking
    • Primarily driven by rage , fear , anger , and/or frustration
    • Have no clear, understandable goals
    • Express ventilation
    • Needs NOTHING from police
    • High potential for murder/suicide or suicide by cop
  • 10. Philosophy of Crisis Negotiations
    • The only aspect of a crisis situation the WE have absolute control over is our own
    • EMOTIONS
    • The first step is NOT to control subject’s behavior but to control your own
    • De-escalate the situation to lower tension
    • Focus on process rather than the outcome
  • 11. Stages of Negotiation *
    • Venting
    • Courtship/Rapport Building
    • Problem identification
    • Solution/Future focus
    • Surrender ritual
    Guide, not an absolute. May skip a stage or repeat stages *
  • 12. Venting
    • Emotional expressive
    • Logic out the window
    • Lash out at everyone, especially the police and negotiator
    • Good stage, but frustrating
    • Let them vent, keep calm
  • 13. Courtship
    • Building trust
    • Give and take
    • Misunderstanding is common
    • Get use to each other and find out about each other.
    • Be patient, don’t push.
    • Rapport through empathy
  • 14. Problem Identification
    • Find out what’s really bothering them
    • What caused the situation
    • Try to identify physical problems (mental illness, substance abuse, financial situation, etc.);
    • Try to identify relational problems (domestic, work related, etc.)
    • Get affirmation from suspect/victim about problem. Don’t’ try to solve until you know all the problems.
  • 15. Solution/Future Focus
    • Attempt to offer a solution to the dominant problem(s) facing suspect/victim
    • Let suspect/victim weigh alternatives
    • Future focus is essential. Can be accomplished by:
      • Exception Question
      • Outcome Question
      • Coping Question
  • 16. What does the everyday Citizen expect from the Police?
    • Catch the ‘bad guys’
    • get the music turned down
    • stop those speeders in their neighborhood
    • make their kids obey them
    • throw their spouse in jail for abuse 
  • 17. Again who is the “typical person” in Crisis ? N ormal everyday citizens can be in crisis irate spouses, jilted lovers anxious employees, rejected students mood disordered, suicidal and deluded individuals .
  • 18. What Dr Webster explains in his article is that most Negotiation situations require Active Listening Skills , however the Negotiator must also be a : Problem Solver
  • 19. (base on 4,542 Negotiation incidents) HOBAS Information
  • 20. HOBAS Information

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