Business Model Creativity

  • 1,450 views
Uploaded on

A short introduction

A short introduction

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,450
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5

Actions

Shares
Downloads
114
Comments
0
Likes
7

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Andreas Rusnjak, MBAeMail: aru@businessmodelcreativity.net URI: businessmodelcreativity.net Twitter & facebook: bmcreativity
  • 2. Agenda• In General• Business Modeling• Business Model Framework• Business Model Framework as a Management-Tool• SpeedCreation – A project incubator
  • 3. About Andreas• Year of birth 1974 • Dissertation at CAU Kiel/ Uni Leipzig• Apprenticeship in "Foreign Commerce" • e/m Business• Diploma Degree in Economics • Transformation of Business Models• Master of Business Administration • Business Model Framework• Job- & Startup-Experience • HUK-Coburg • Focus • Jobscout24 • eCommerce • flyerwire • Consulting, Coaching • scovilla • Entrepreneurship • Caban • Business Modeling • BAUR • Strategy Development
  • 4. Work in Progress…Authors:Andreas RusnjakMatthias PohleThomas Matyssek
  • 5. IN GENERAL
  • 6. The Goal of every Company should be to create anddeliver a customer value which will be better than the value offered by the competition.
  • 7. Increasing competitive pressure, technological advance, innovation, changing social values and a continuously rising power of the user are forcingcompanies more and more to challenge and change their business models, to develop new business models or to liquidate existing ones.
  • 8. EXAMPLEThe information-seeking behavior and consumerism of the user is shifting increasingly to different channels Social Media Magazines, Journals PCs/ Notebooks Embedded Hardware
  • 9. XMulti-Channel  Cross-/ Omni-Channel Bildquelle: Deviantart | X-Rails | ~Shadownoise
  • 10. Bildquelle: Deviantart | change | ~sphinxed
  • 11. Bildquelle: Deviantart | change | ~sphinxed
  • 12. Usenet, Torrents, Rapidshare, Megaupload, Youtube  Decreasing CD-Sales Bildquelle: Deviantart | Music | ~Miggi4Deviant
  • 13. Bildquelle: Deviantart | Warner Bros. | *JohnVichlenski
  • 14. e.g. Apples iBooks Author or Amazons Kindle Direct Publishing enables Authors to publish their books easy by themselvesBildquelle: Deviantart | Book Store | ~varunabhiram
  • 15. Brokerage for used books Shipping Consumer Goods Marketplace 3rd-party sellers Online Book Store Amazon OEM Web (Kindle) Services ContentSuccess Recipes: ProviderRadical Profit Formula (lovefilm,Market-Oriented Value Propositions ebooks)Bringing strengths, know how and key resources to market
  • 16. Macintosh Computer iMac iPod Combination of technology- iPhone and design-based solutions iPad Improving a single product in many different waysBildquelle: Deviantart | Apple | ~TheDeadManWalking
  • 17. Trends for this Decade • Functionality • Engagement & Experience • Co-Creation & Lean-Startup • Crowdfunding/ Community-Funding • Eco-/ Green Business Models • In-Crowd Customers • …Adapted from: Thaesis
  • 18. The Transformation-Cycles of business models will become more frequentand will occur at increasingly short intervals
  • 19. In this context Transformation means the development, the design, the change and/ or the implementation of a business model. Today the capability for transformation can be seen as a critical success factor for companies.
  • 20. Roles involved in transformation processes Sales HR Production Customer Care …
  • 21. Participants of transformation projects are often different in their professional background and their experience as well as in their social background and education. These people often speak and think in different pictures and languages.
  • 22. Common reasons for the failure of transformation projects• Unrealistic goals• Important stakeholders are not involved• Lack of support by the top management• Insufficient Resources• Unclear context to strategy• Poor communication• No or little involvement of the project members
  • 23. It is a 100 times more expensive to fix errors in production than during the earliest development phases of transformation projects.B. Boehm and V. Basili, “Software Defect Reduction Top 10 List,” IEEE Computer, vol. 34(1): 135-137, January 2001
  • 24. According to Roland Berger in Germany, there is a pent-up demand for innovation- and technology-managementas well as for concepts to increase personnel productivity. Klesse, H.-J.: Roland Berger vor Neupositionierung. http://www.wiwo.de/unternehmen-maerkte/roland-berger-vor-neupositionierung-435809/, 21.02.2011
  • 25. BUSINESS MODELING
  • 26. "Business model innovation will become as importantas technological innovation." Henry Chesbrough (2011)
  • 27. "There has never been as much interest in businessmodels as there is today; seven out of 10 companies aretrying to create innovative business models, and 98% are modifying existing ones, according to a recent survey." Casedesus-Masanell & Ricart (Harvard Business Review, JAN-FEB/2011)
  • 28. The term business modeling is often associated with the transformation of business models and has gained attention since the emergence of the New Economy.
  • 29. A business model describes in an abstract way a relevant selection of products (goods and services), necessary means and correspondinginformation-, transfer and financial-flows along the value chain(s) of a company or a business unit.
  • 30. Important elements of a business model are(1) involved actors (e.g. customers, suppliers, co-operation partner, competitors, etc.) and their goals/ intention, (2) the value proposition, (3) channels and (4) relationships, (5) key resources, (6) key activities, (7) relevant costs and (8) revenues as well as (9) critical success factors and (10) the representation of the competitive strategies.
  • 31. BMCreativity Business Model Framework
  • 32. Entrepreneurial Business Modeling means the development of a business model – referred to the definition before – in its first, early stage of development and is used to create competitive advantage/ growth through Creativity.
  • 33. Formal Business Modeling should be used on later stages of development and higher degrees of maturity of a business model and should lead tocompetitive advantage/ growth through Efficiency.
  • 34. The focus of bmcreativity points to theearly stages of business model development.
  • 35. Business Modeling and Business Process Modeling Who offers what to whom? What are the value creating activities? Business Modeling Business Process Modeling Who are the value-adding business actors involved? Who are the actors involved in the operations? What are the offerings of which actors to which Which operational activities can be distinguished? other actors? Which activities are executed by which actors? What are the elements of offerings? What are the inputs and outputs of activities? What value-creating or -adding activities produce and consume these offerings? What is the sequence of activities to be carried out Which value-creating or -adding activities are for a specific case? performed by which actors?Gordijn, J.; Akkermans, H.; van Vliet, H.: Business Modelling Is Not Process Modelling.; Conceptual Modeling for E-Business and the Web, 2000; S. 40‐51
  • 36. Business Model and Strategy
  • 37. Level of Competition Ecosystem
  • 38. PROCESS & BUSINESS MODEL-FRAMEWORK
  • 39. The Goal of every Company should be to create and deliver a customer value which will be better than the value offered by the competition. An important means of reaching this goal is the right configuration of the business model components and the right answers to fundamental key questions*.*Key Questions based on a lot of well known researchers and praticioners…
  • 40. The BMCreativity-Framework has been proven• The following framework can also be applied in the product development.• Experience shows significant results in reducing time-to-market as well as the design and redesign of business models or products after 2-3 workshop days.• The concept has been proven both in teaching and in the startup/ corporate group environment.
  • 41. The BMCreativity Business Modeling Process
  • 42. Process (in short) Define the Problem and its possible solution Find a way to bring it to market
  • 43. Following the CREACTION-Approach
  • 44. Important elements of a business model are(1) involved actors (e.g. customers, suppliers, co-operation partner, competitors, etc.) and their goals/ intention, (2) the value proposition, (3) channels and (4) relationships, (5) key resources, (6) key activities, (7) relevant costs and (8) revenues as well as (9) critical success factors and (10) the representation of the competitive strategies.
  • 45. Begin with the NABC
  • 46. The NABC-Framework• What are the most important, vital customer- and market-needs or grievances that point to needs?• What are the unique approaches to address these needs?• What is the specific benefit for your customers and your company?• How predominant are these approaches against your competition or alternatives available for your customers?
  • 47. The NABC-Framework Systematic development of a value proposition within four Phases: 4. COMPETITION
  • 48. Design the Value Proposition
  • 49. • Which customer segments do we address?Design the Value Proposition • What are the central customers’ needs? • What do we, our friends, our family or colleagues lack? • What are the challenges our customers struggle with? • What can we improve? • What are the typical use cases? • Where is our chance? • How important is the solution for our customers? • What is important for our customers (price, quality, time, speed, status quo, know-how …)?
  • 50. • What is the design of our solution/ approach?Design the Value Proposition • How is our product* designed? • What are our core processes? • What is our USP? • How is the product developed and offered to our customers? • In which situations does the customer use our product? • What are the most important touchpoints and shared experiences between us and our users? • Which role do we play? *product = service and/ or good
  • 51. Design the Value Proposition • What is the benefit for our customers? • Which advantages does our approach create for our customers? • Which results do we want to provide to our customers? • Which functional, monetary and emotional benefits will our customers have? • What is the benefit for our company?
  • 52. Design the Value Proposition • Which alternatives exist today? • Who and where are our most important (possible) competitors? • Which alternatives can come tomorrow? • What or where are the (possible) risks? • What will happen if we do nothing? • What are our most important chances or competencies on market? • Do we have market entry barriers? • Can we create market entry barriers?
  • 53. Design the Value Proposition • Our value proposition/ USP in one short sentence • Alternatively: Our value proposition/ USP in a maximum of seven words
  • 54. From value proposition to business model framework
  • 55. THE COMPONENTS
  • 56. Bring or keep your business on the road…2 FRAMEWORKS  ONE MISSION
  • 57. BMCreativity Business Model Framework
  • 58. Osterwalders Business Model Canvas
  • 59. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • What are the most important, vital customer- and market-needs or grievances/challenges that point to needs? • What are the unique approaches to address these needs? • What is the specific benefit for our customers and our company? • How predominant are these approaches against your competition or alternatives available for our customers?
  • 60. Value Propositionin Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 61. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • Who are our customers? • Who are our most important customers? • Which customer segments do we address? • Whose problems do we solve? • Which role do our customers have in their organization?
  • 62. Customer Segmentsin Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 63. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • Which channels are qualified to reach our customers? • How do we reach them today? • How are these channels integrated into our processes or routines? • How can we integrate these channels into the processes or routines of our customers? • Which channel performs best? • Which channel is most cost-effective?
  • 64. Channelsin Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 65. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • Which kind of relationship do our customer segments allow and how much will it cost? • Do we have any existing relationships to our customers and how much do they cost? • How are these relationships integrated into our routines and touchpoints?
  • 66. Customer Relationshipsin Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 67. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • How do we earn money? • Which benefit/ value are customers willing to pay for? • Which benefit/ value do customers pay for currently? • How (much?) do the customers pay currently? • Which contribution provides every revenue stream compared to the total revenue?
  • 68. Revenue Streamsin Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 69. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • What are the sources for market differentiation and how do our activities support them? • Which resources do we need to perform our key activities? • Which resources do we need to deliver our value proposition? • Which resources do our channels, customer relationships and revenues need?
  • 70. Key Resourcesin Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 71. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • What are the sources for market differentiation and how do our activities support them? • What is our job in the value chain? • What are the most important activities? • Which benefit/ value will they provide? • Which activities should be automated? • How can activities be linked in a novel way? • Which activities are customers not willing to pay for? • Which activities do our channels, customer relationships and revenues need?
  • 72. Key Activitiesin Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 73. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • Which activities should we perform by ourselves and which should we buy from market? • Who are our most important partners? • Which partners do we need to perform our key activities and to deliver our value proposition? • Which key activities are performed by our partners? • Which key resources are delivered by our partners? • Which dependencies can arise or already exists?
  • 74. Key Partnershipsin Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 75. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • What are the most important costs? • Which key activities are the most expensive? • Which key resources are the most expensive? • Which channels are the most expensive? • Which customer relationships are the most expensive? • Which key partners are the most expensive?
  • 76. Cost Structurein Anlehnung an Alexander Osterwalder (2010), online aus: http://www.slideshare.net/Alex.Osterwalder/what-is-a-business-model
  • 77. Difference between BMCreativity-Framework and Osterwalders Business Model Canvas…
  • 78. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • Which factors influence our company’s success? • Which strengths should we enhance and which weaknesses should we eliminate? • Which chances should we use and which risks should we avoid? • Which trends can be observed on the market and what is their influence on the market/ our company?
  • 79. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • Who are our competitors and in which fields, segments, … are their value propositions superior to our value proposition? • In which fields, segments, … is our value proposition superior or on the verge of becoming superior? • Do we want to play in a niche? • Do we want to be cost leader or differentiator? • Which resources, activities and partnerships can lead to strategic competitive advantages?
  • 80. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • Where do we want to be in 2, 5, 10 years?
  • 81. BMCreativity Business Model Framework • How do we want to be perceived by our stakeholders?
  • 82. THE BUSINESS MODEL FRAMEWORK AS AMANAGEMENT TOOL
  • 83. External View This side addresses the WHO  Do the right things!
  • 84. Internal View This side addresses the HOW  Do the things right!
  • 85. Value View Focus to NABC-Framework, generally used at the begin of the business modeling process. This view addresses the WHAT and is the base to configure the other components around the value proposition!
  • 86. Competitive View Focus to Key Resources, Key Activities, Competition, internal Critical Success Factors, Approach, Channels, Market-based Strategies and the Revenue Model
  • 87. Customer/ Network View Focus to Need, Benefit, Customers, Customer Relationships, external Critical Success Factors, Key Partners, Cost Structure and Resource-based Strategies
  • 88. How? What? Who? Costs Revenues
  • 89. Business Model Innovation/ Transformation
  • 90. Sources• Forrester Research Inc.• Harvard Business Review• MIT Sloan Management Review• Dissertation (zur Zeit in Begutachtung)• More Information:
  • 91. or download it here without slideshare-account goo.gl/1ogrXQUESTIONS/ DISCUSSION?