Transcinema: The purpose, uniqueness, and future of cinema
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Transcinema: The purpose, uniqueness, and future of cinema

on

  • 1,074 views

This paper was presented the 2013 Key West International Multidisciplinary Academic Conference: www.isisworld.org/‎

This paper was presented the 2013 Key West International Multidisciplinary Academic Conference: www.isisworld.org/‎

The conference took place at Pier House Hotel from May 4 - 5.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,074
Views on SlideShare
985
Embed Views
89

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

1 Embed 89

http://metabletics.wordpress.com 89

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Transcinema: The purpose, uniqueness, and future of cinema Presentation Transcript

  • 1. TRANSCINEMA  The  purpose,  uniqueness,  and  future  of  cinema  Robert  Beshara,  University  of  West  Georgia,  Carrollton,  GA,  USA  
  • 2. INTRODUCTION  Stalker (Tarkovsky, 1979)
  • 3. Beyond  and  through  what  exactly?  •  As  a  prefix  trans-­‐  means  beyond  but  also  through.  But  beyond  what  exactly?  I  argue  for  a  cinema  that  is  beyond  mere  entertainment  and  commercialism.  Not  that  these  are  bad  things,  they  are  just  not  enough  given  cinema’s  potenOal  to  help  us  change  through  transcendence  as  individuals  and  as  a  community.  However,  to  transcend  means  to  include  and  go  beyond,  so  in  principle  entertainment  and  commercialism  are  not  incompaOble  with  transcinema.    •  Also,  I  see  a  human  being  as  an  animal  symbolicum  who  is  trying  to  understand  herself,  to  borrow  Ernst  Cassirer’s  term.  In  search  for  meaning  we  create  or  come  across  symbols.  In  our  case,  the  symbols  are  conveyed  through  moving  images.  •  I  argue  as  well  that  transcinemaOc  effects  can  be  achieved  through  the  exploraOon  of—parOcularly  avant-­‐garde  and  experimental—cinema’s  transpersonal  dimensions.    
  • 4. Is  cinema  dead?  •  “I  think  that  the  cinema  died  on  the  31st  of  September  1983.  There  is  a  reason  for  that,  because  on  31st  of  September  1983  the  remote  control,  the  zapper  was  introduced  into  the  living  rooms  of  the  world.  Cinema  is  a  passive  medium.  I  never  quite  understood  really  how  it  works.  […]  So,  you  are  si]ng  in  the  dark,  man  is  not  a  nocturnal  animal  […]  looking  in  one  direcOon,  si]ng  sOll?  And  you  commit  yourself  to  the  flat  screen  on  which  there  are  colored  shadows.  What  an  extraordinary  descripOon  of  an  obsession.  Unfortunately,  I  think,  if  the  cinema  died  in  31st  of  September  1983  I  think  it  was  a  sOll  birth,  because  I  dont  think  any  of  you  in  this  room  have  seen  any  cinema  yet.  All  you  have  seen  is  105  years  of  illustrated  text  and  that  is  not  the  same  thing”  (Greenaway,  2001).  •  Greenaway  was  commenOng  on  cinema  generally,  but  film  stock,  in  parOcular,  as  cinema’s  main  format  for  the  last  century  is  being  replaced  by  a  digital  alternaOve.  Since  the  90s,  the  advent  of  digital  filmmaking  has  been  empowering  to  many  filmmakers,  amateurs  and  professionals  alike,  due  to  the  relaOvely  low  costs  of  digital  film  equipments  and  their  ease  of  use,  as  well  as  the  fairly  recent  development  of  Web  2.0,  which  has  rendered  the  Internet  a  democraOc  and  interacOve  plaform  for  sharing  ideas  virtually  and  quickly.  Obviously,  cinema  has  some  catching  up  to  do.    
  • 5. AlternaOves  to  a  dead  cinema?  •  One  of  Greenaway’s  recent  projects  is  called  LUPERPEDIA  and  it  is  described  as  “the  Live  Cinema  Event  of  the  Tulse  Luper  Suitcases  Project,  an  encyclopedic  mulO-­‐media  show  deliberately  made  for  the  InformaOon  Age”  (European  Graduate  School,  2011).  It  can  perhaps  be  experienced  as  merely  a  sophisOcated  avant-­‐garde  VJ  show  with  which  Greenaway  has  successfully  toured  the  world,  or  we  can  think  of  it  as  stretching  the  limits  of  cinema  or  even  going  beyond  them.    •  If  cinema  is  indeed  dead,  one  is  lek  with  the  spiritual  quesOon:  is  there  an  akerlife?  And  if  so,  what  is  it  like?  Perhaps,  the  death  of  cinema  is  the  rebirth  of  cinema  as  transcinema:  resuscitaOng  its  therapeuOc/healing  purpose  in  terms  of  dramaOc  structure  through  a  revival  of  the  Aristotelian  noOon  of  catharsis.  Why  cinema  you  might  ask?  I  argue  that  cinema  is  unique  albeit  its  roots  are  in  theatre.  Perhaps,  LUPERPEDIA  as  a  project  is  one  example  that  gives  us  a  glimpse  into  the  future  of  cinema.  
  • 6. Three  aspects  of    TRANSCINEMA  I.  Its  transforma)ve  potenOal  or  forgonen  purpose,  II.  Its  transdisciplinarity  or  why  it  is  unique,  III. And  its  future  vis-­‐à-­‐vis  transhumanism.    
  • 7. I.  TRANSFORMATION  •  The  core  ethic  of  mainstream  cinema  today  seems  to  be  inspired  by  the  pleasure  principle  of  profit,  which  is  a  deviaOon  from  the  ancient  purpose  of  drama,  that  is,  catharsis.      •  Certainly,  many  people  go  to  the  movies  to  get  distracted  from  their  daily  worries  and  that  may  be  a  legiOmate  form  of  escapism,  but  going  to  the  cinema  because  it  is  pleasurable  should  be  half  of  the  story.  The  other  half  is  that  cinema  can  help  us  transform  suffering,  whether  as  audience  members  or  as  filmmakers.  The  metaphor  of  the  cinema  screen  as  a  mirror  is  fi]ng  here  because  cinema  at  its  worst  can  be  an  exercise  in  narcissism  wherein  what  is  reflected  can  make  us  delusional.  At  its  best,  cinema  can  reflect  truths,  whether  beauOful,  ugly  or  anything  in  between,  which  ideally  can  cause  us  to  self-­‐reflect,  and  perhaps  inspire  us  to  manage  and  change  some  of  our  dysfuncOonal  parts  or  subpersonaliOes  as  we  idenOfy  with  the  protagonist  in  her  struggle.    
  • 8. Cinema  as  a  cultural  and/or  personal  mirror  as  well  as  cultural  therapeuOcs  •  “Shakespeare  said  that  art  is  a  mirror  held  up  to  nature.  And  that’s  what  it  is.  The  nature  is  your  nature,  and  all  of  these  wonderful  poeOc  images  of  mythology  are  referring  to  something  in  you.  When  your  mind  is  trapped  by  the  image  out  there  so  that  you  never  make  the  reference  to  yourself,  you  have  misread  the  image”  (Campbell,  1991).  •  Romanyshyn  (2008),  building  on  Van  den  Berg’s  work,  writes:  “we  are  not  surprised  that  Van  den  Berg  even  coins  a  new  word  for  neuroses,  calling  them  ‘socioses’  (1971,  p.  341).  […]  It  acknowledges  that  the  social-­‐cultural  world  is  the  field  of  human  psychological  life.  There  is  a  not  a  social  world  apart  from  the  psychological  world,  acOng  upon  it  from  the  outside.  Rather  the  psychological  world  is  the  social  world,  and  the  social  world  is  the  visible  expression  of  the  psychological  world,  the  place  where  psychological  life  is  made  concrete  and  incarnate.  It  follows,  then,  that  any  psychotherapy  of  neuroses  will  be  a  therapy  of  the  social  world,  or  as  we  have  said  a  cultural  therapeuOcs.”    Ci<zen  Kane  (Welles,  1941).  
  • 9. TRANSCINEMA  is  like  the  red  pill  •  In  The  Matrix  (1999),  which  explores  many  philosophical  and  spiritual  themes,  before  Neo  wakes  up  from  the  matrix  he  looks  at  a  mirror  and  touches  it  to  realize  that  it  has  a  fluid  structure,  this  series  of  surreal  shots,  one  can  argue,  marks  a  major  plot  point  or  transiOon  in  the  film  that  compellingly  seems  symbolic  of  the  difference  between  maya  (Sanskrit  for  illusion)  and  brahma  (Sanskrit  for  the  ulOmate  ground  of  all  being)  to  use  Hindu  terminology.  Neo  experiences  an  awakening  both  literally  and  symbolically  as  he  shiks  from  the  virtual  world  to  the  real  world.  Enlightenment  is  oken  conceptualized  as  a  posiOve  experience,  but  it  is  neither  posiOve  nor  negaOve.  In  other  words,  it  is  beyond  posiOve  and  negaOve.  Neo  wakes  up  to  the  painful  truth  (aka  reality)—the  red  pill—that  looks  worse  than  the  illusory  world  of  the  matrix—the  blue  pill;  that  is  his  experience  of  awakening.  Transcinema  is  like  the  red  pill,  but  ulOmately  the  choice  is  ours  because  as  film  viewers  we  ought  to  be  acOve  parOcipants,  and  that  is  our  responsibility.    The  Matrix  (Wachowski,  &  Wachowski,  1999).  
  • 10. The  cinema  screen  as  a  portal:  the  power  of  metaphor  Rob  Ager  (2008)  writes  about  the  mysterious  monolith  from  Stanley  Kubrick’s  masterpiece  2001:  A  Space  Odyssey,  which  was  hailed  as  “the  greatest  sci-­‐fi  film  of  all  Ome”  by  the  Online  Film  CriOcs  Society  (2002),  as  a  metaphor:  “For  Bowman,  the  realizaOon  of  the  cinema  screen  paradigm  creates  a  doorway  through  which  he  can  symbolically  leave  his  own  universe.  Reborn  in  the  enclosed  renaissance  room,  which  has  no  doorway,  the  camera  assumes  his  point  of  view  and  moves  directly  into  the  upright  monolith.  In  this  shot  the  monolith  acts  as  a  doorway  straight  back  to  Bowman’s  own  cinemaOc  universe”.  To  take  this  further,  we  can  think  of  the  cinema  screen  as  a  portal,  which  can  transport  us,  as  viewers,  to  different  worlds,  wherein  we  can  experience  all  sorts  of  emoOons  and  ideas.  2001:  A  Space  Odyssey  (Kubrick,  1968).  
  • 11. Catharsis;    it  all  came  from  Aristotle  •  Humphry  House  (1966)  in  wriOng  about  Aristotle’s  Poe<cs  explains  that  it  is  not  important  whether  catharsis  is  a  metaphor  from  religion  or  medicine,  in  either  case  it  is  a  technical  term  which  results  in  “an  emoOonal  balance  and  equilibrium:  and  it  may  well  be  called  a  state  of  emoOonal  health.”  The  therapeuOc  purpose  of  tragedy,  hence,  was  explored  since  the  18th  Century  B.C.  if  not  before.  House  adds  that  “Aristotle’s  educaOve  and  ‘curaOve’  theory  [i.e.,  the  purging  of  emoOons  through  pity  and  fear]  has  a  very  important  element  of  permanent  truth  in  it”  and  this  is  contrasted  by  the  effect  of  “inferior  art,”  namely  “senOmentality,”  which  is  prominent  in  many  Hollywood  movies.    •  But  what  does  catharsis  exactly  mean?  According  to  Joe  Sachs  (2005):  “Catharsis  in  Greek  can  mean  purificaOon.  While  purging  something  means  ge]ng  rid  of  it,  purifying  something  means  ge]ng  rid  of  the  worse  or  baser  parts  of  it.”  This  means  that  pity  and  fear,  or  suffering  in  general,  may  be  useful  to  us  because  as  symptoms  they  are  there  for  a  reason  but  the  key  thing  is  to  be  mindful  of  our  suffering  and  not  to  idenOfy  with  it  to  be  able  to  transform  it,  or  to  put  a  posiOve  spin  on  the  previous  analysis,  “for  many  alchemists  the  purificaOon  of  metals  in  alchemical  transmutaOon  was  matched  by  a  purificaOon  of  the  soul  [or  mind],  a  kind  of  self-­‐transmutaOon  in  the  HermeOc  Great  Work”  (Morrisson,  2007).  Therefore,  watching  or  making  transcinema  should  feel  like  an  alchemical  process.    
  • 12. “The  Secret  Name  of  Cinema  is  TransformaOon”  (Broughton,  1978)  •  Kaplan  (2005)  thinks  that  “the  surrealisOc  and  expressionisOc  styles  appear  to  have  a  greater  capacity  for  the  expression  of  transpersonal  concepts  and  experiences  because  of  the  symbolic,  intuiOve,  visceral,  and  araOonal  nature  of  these  styles.”  What  may  be  added  to  that  statement  is  that  surreal  films  have  had  an  affinity  with  psychoanalysis  historically  for  surrealism’s  goal  is  “to  develop  the  human  personality  by  bringing  repressed  desires  into  consciousness”  by  integraOng  “the  irraOonal  with  the  raOonal”  through  translaOng  unconscious  content  (e.g.,  dreams,  memories,  visions)  to  conscious  cinemaOc  images  (Duplessis,  1962);  however,  transcinema  is  not  just  surreal,  it  more  broadly  tends  to  be  avant-­‐garde  or  experimental.    •  Examples  of  transcinema  include  some  of  the  works  of  the  following  transcineasts:  Maya  Deren  (e.g.,  Meshes  of  the  AJernoon),  Federico  Fellini  (e.g.,  8  ½),  Andrei  Tarkovsky  (e.g.,  Stalker),  Stanley  Kunbrick  (e.g.,  2001:  A  Space  Odyssey),  Alejandro  Jodorowsky  (e.g.,  The  Holy  Mountain),  and  David  Lynch  (e.g.,  Eraserhead).  Meshes  of  the  AJernoon  (Deren,  &  Hammid,  1943).  
  • 13. Cinema  therapy?  •  Cinema  therapists  (see  Solomon,  2001;  Wolz,  2005;  Niemiec  and  Wedding,  2008)  use  films  as  a  psychospiritual  tool  in  their  pracOce.  These  psychologists  tend  to  prescribe  the  appropriate  films  (i.e.,  films  exploring  concerns—usually  experienced  by  the  protagonist—that  resonate  with  the  client’s  concerns)  to  their  clients.  As  the  client  idenOfies  with  the  film’s  protagonist,  she  may  be  able  to  work  through  some  of  her  issues  slowly  but  surely.    
  • 14. The  Psychomagic  of  cinema  •  Andrzej  Szczeklik  (2005)  may  have  an  answer  as  to  why  we  talk  about  the  magic  of  cinema:  “Medicine  and  art  are  descended  from  the  same  roots.  They  both  originated  in  magic—a  pracOce  based  on  the  omnipotence  of  the  word.”  Chilean  filmmaker  and  father  of  the  midnight  movie,  Alejandro  Jodorowsky,  who  came  up  with  his  own  psychospiritual  system  known  as  Psychomagic  takes  the  noOon  of  catharsis  further  by  saying:  “The  world  is  ill.  We  need  to  make  therapy  pictures.  If  art  is  not  a  medicine  for  the  society,  it  is  a  poison”  (ABKCO  Films,  2007).    The  Holy  Mountain  (Jodorowsky,  1973).  
  • 15. Psychomagical  cinema  •  Confessional  cinema,  which  is  explored  at  length  by  filmmaker/film  professor  Caveh  Zahedi,  could  be  regarded  as  a  Psychomagical  film  genre  because  it  tends  to  rely  on  the  filmmaker  sharing  his/her  vulnerabiliOes  during  the  process  as  they  are  trying  to  change  a  negaOve  aspect  about  themselves—see  I  Am  A  Sex  Addict  (Zahedi,  2005).    •  We  live  in  revoluOonary  Omes  because  the  technologies  of  the  day  have  the  potenOal  to  bring  all  of  us  Internet  users  together.  We  can  use  all  of  these  technologies  that  we  have  available  to  us  at  the  present  moment  to  help  us  heal  and  grow  as  individuals  and  as  communiOes,  as  we  express  ourselves  creaOvely  and  communicate  our  uniqueness  arOsOcally.    •  Our  video  diaries  or  film  essays  can  be  regarded  as  our  anempt  to  understand  the  human  condiOon  a  linle  bit  bener  through  creaOve  self-­‐reflecOon,  or  they  can  be  regarded  as  expressions  of  a  therapeuOc  process.    I  Am  A  Sex  Addict  (Zahedi,  2005)  
  • 16. A  more  complete  spirituality:  The  dark  night  of  the  soul  •  It  may  be  surprising  to  you  to  consider  a  dark  film  that  impeccably  captures  depression  as  transcinemaOc,  but  Lynch  himself  wrote:  “Eraserhead  is  my  most  spiritual  movie.  No  one  understands  when  I  say  that,  but  it  is”  (2006).  A  spirituality  that  only  focuses  on  the  bright  side  of  things  is  a  superficial  one;  a  more  holisOc  approach  to  spirituality,  beyond  false  dichotomies,  is  one  that  acknowledges  both  the  darkness  and  the  lightness  of  the  human  condiOon  a  la  the  yin-­‐yang.  It  is  not  within  the  scope  of  this  paper  to  explore  this  issue  at  length,  but  suffice  it  to  say  that  there  is  value  in  the  experience  of  ‘the  dark  night  of  the  soul’  because  it  is  through  contrast  that  we  can  come  to  understand  and  maybe  appreciate  what  is  present  and  what  is  lacking.    Eraserhead  (Lynch,  1977).  
  • 17. II.  Transdisciplinarity  •  Cinema  as  ‘the  seventh  art’:  Canudo  extends  G.W.F.  Hegel’s  aestheOcs,  wherein  the  laner  conceptualized  “the  five  arts  [architecture,  sculpture,  painOng,  music,  and  poetry]  that  he  thinks  are  made  necessary  by  the  very  concept  of  art  itself”  (Houlgate,  2010),  the  former  added  dance  as  the  sixth  art—iniOally  it  was  cinema—and  cinema  as  the  seventh  art,  which  according  to  Canudo  transcended  the  Rhythmic  arts  of  Space  (aka  the  PlasOc  Arts)  and  Time—i.e.,  music,  poetry,  and  dance—combined  (Abel,  1993).  Perhaps  transcinema,  as  a  spaceOme  sculpture  in  movement*,  can  interdimensionally  transporst  us  viewers  from  the  second  dimension  (i.e.,  a  flat  screen)  to  the  third  dimension  (i.e.,  a  transcinemaOc  experience).    •  Canudo  implicitly  hints  to  the  transpersonal  nature  of  cinema  in  1923  when  he  writes:                Ac<on  in—only  in—the  cinema  should  be  nothing  more  than  a  corporeal  detail,  a  material  consequence,  a  visual  expression  of  a  collec<ve  psychology.  The  theatre,  on  the  other  hand,  can  only  focus  on  the  individual  and  will  always  remain  more  oriented  toward  the  specifically  psychological.  Cinema  will  thereby  prove  to  be  the  supreme  ar<s<c  means  of  representa<on  and  expression  of  milieus  and  people.  It  will  cease  being  ‘individual,’  copying  the  theatre,  which  in  turn  copies  life  (Abel,  1993).    A  Trip  to  the  Moon  (Méliès,  1902).  *cinema comes from the French word cinématographe, which comes from the Greek word kinēmameaning movement.
  • 18. The  ‘synchronizaOon  of  the  senses’  •  That  is,  “the  integraOon  of  word,  image  and  sound,  and  the  accumulaOon  of  successive  images  and  sounds  [that  serve]  to  construct  percepOon,  meaning,  and  emoOon  (p.  69)”  (quoted  in  Kaplan,  2005).  A  fine  example  of  that  to  menOon  but  one  would  be  ‘The  Blue  Danube’  sequence  in  2001:  A  Space  Odyssey,  which  “[a]t  first  glance  […]  may  seem  long  and  unnecessary  but  it  is  a  crucial  scene  to  understanding  Kubrick’s  vision  of  the  future.  The  use  of  music  and  movement  is  designed  to  give  the  impression  of  the  machines  waltzing,  which  is  the  ulOmate  expression  of  the  state  of  grace  that  humanity-­‐built  technology  has  now  achieves”  (Caldwell,  2011).  That  sequence  conveys  a  lot  of  visual  informaOon  that  forces  us  to  react  emoOonally  and  to  construct  meaning  as  we  are  interpreOng  the  images  and  the  sounds  being  juxtaposed,  and  all  of  that  happens  without  the  use  of  any  dialogue  and  it  is  this  translinguisOc  potenOal  of  transcinema  that  can  render  it  indeed  a  universal  language.    2001:  A  Space  Odyssey  (Kubrick,  1968)  
  • 19. The  translinguisOc  potenOal  of  TRANSCINEMA:    a  universal  language?  Another  excellent  example  of  a  translinguisOc  film  would  be  the  prototypical  experimental  documentary  film  Koyaanisqatsi  (1982)  which  showcases  some  of  the  effects  that  human  beings  have  had  on  nature  over  Ome  and  some  of  the  effects  of  technology  on  us,  and  this  is  shown  to  us  by  resorOng  only  to  edited  moving  images  and  a  minimalist  soundtrack.  Of  course,  some  techniques  (e.g.,  slow  moOon  and  Ome-­‐lapse  cinematography)  were  used  as  part  of  the  film’s  vocabulary  but  there  was  no  use  of  dialogue  proper.    Koyaanisqatsi  (Reggio,  1982).  
  • 20. III.  Transhumanism    Ray  Kurzweil  (2005,  p.9):  “The  Singularity  will  represent  the  culminaOon  of  the  merger  of  our  biological  thinking  and  existence  with  our  technology,  resulOng  in  a  world  that  is  sOll  human  but  that  transcends  our  biological  roots.  There  will  be  no  disOncOon,  post-­‐Singularity,  between  human  and  machine  or  between  physical  and  virtual  reality.”  Even  though  Kurzweil  (p.  145)  thinks,  “nonbiological  mediums  will  be  able  to  emulate  the  richness,  subtlety,  and  depth  of  human  thinking,”  they,  according  to  him,  “will  not  automaOcally  produce  human  levels  of  capability  (e.g.,  musical  and  arOsOc  apOtude,  creaOvity,  etc.).  In  other  words,  in  the  future  envisioned  by  Kurzweil,  transcineasts  will  sOll  have  a  role  to  play  as  “panernists”  who  arrange  let’s  say  shots  in  just  the  right  way  that  they  transcend  their  materiality  and  randomness  to  become  art—symbolic,  meaningful,  etc.  This  is  the  so-­‐called  magic  of  cinema:  the  transcendence  of  (i.e.,  including  and  going  beyond)  all  levels  of  reality—natural  and  man-­‐made.    
  • 21. Cinema  as  an  art  is  not  separate  from  technology,  and  so  as  technology  changes…  cinema  as  an  art  form  changes,  too.  And  this  is  something  worth  thinking  about  in  the  context  of  the  noOon  of    technological  singularity  &  accelera<ng  change  
  • 22. An  exemplar  of  a  Singularitarian  transcineast  would  be  Greenaway  especially  with  his  experimental  project  LUPERPEDIA,  which  claims  to  be  “a  highly  innovaOve  audio-­‐visual  experiment  intended  to  challenge  the  borders  of  film  language  and  offer  the  audience  a  totally  new  [trans]cinemaOc  experience”  (European  Graduate  School,  2011).    Will  we,  as  film  viewers,  interact  with  the  films  we  are  watching  in  the  future  a  la  Web  2.0  so  as  to  change  the  course  of  the  plot?    Will  we  download  digital  films  in  the  future  directly  to  our  minds  via  brain  implants?  These  provocaOve  quesOons  are  open  for  scholars  to  think  about  parOcularly  in  the  context  of  emerging  new  media  technologies  and  the  overall  fast  rate  of  technological  acceleraOon.    LUPERPEDIA  (Greenaway,  n.d.)  
  • 23. TRANSCINEMA  and  consciousness  •  Robert  Wise  has  observed  perhaps  the  most  powerful  effect  that  transcinema  can  have  on  us  at  the  level  of  the  collecOve  consciousness  when  he  “noted  the  possible  connecOon  between  the  evoluOon  of  consciousness  and  the  evoluOon  of  the  cinema  [thanks  to  neuroplasOcity].  […]  Wise  explained  that  when  he  first  started  in  the  film  industry  the  moOon  picture  audiences  required  very  clear  linear  story  structures,  and  that  gradually  through  his  career  the  audiences  seemed  to  develop  the  ability  to  more  readily  and  quickly  project  meaning  across  disconOnuous  and  non-­‐linear  cinema  structure”  (quoted  in  Kaplan,  2005).  •  Examples  of  nonlinear  films  include:  The  Killing  (1956),  Pulp  Fic<on  (1994),  The  Thin  Red  Line  (1998),  Magnolia  (1999),  Mulholland  Dr.  (2001),  Memento  (2000),  Eternal  Sunshine  of  the  Spotless  Mind  (2004),  and  Babel  (2006).  This  shows  that  films  are  ge]ng  more  and  more  complex—structurally  at  least.  fFlmmakers’  techniques  and  arOsOc  sensibiliOes  are  ge]ng  more  sophisOcated  (especially  with  the  evoluOon  of  film  technologies)  and  film  viewers’  appreciaOon  for  complexity  is  growing.      The  Killing  (Kubrick,  1956)  
  • 24. We  long  for  transpersonal  themes  even  from  mainstream  movies!                  As  of  06  April  2013,  The  Shawshank  Redemp<on  (1994)  tops  the  list  of  top  250  movies  based  on  946,828  votes  as  voted  by  IMDB  users  who  gave  the  film  the  highest  raOng:  9.2/10  (“Top  250  movies  as  voted  by  our  users”).  The  film’s  central  theme  is  hope—one  of  two  words  used  by  the  Barack  Obama  presidenOal  campaign  in  2009  that  seems  to  have  resonated  with  many  people  back  then.  The  Internet  Movie  Database  is  a  popular  website  and  it  can  be  regarded  as  an  online  democraOc  plaform  wherein  Internet  users  who  are  film  lovers  can  vote  for  their  favorite  films.  The  spectrum  of  voters  includes  lay  people,  experts,  and  everyone  in  between,  whether  male  or  female,  old  or  young,  or  American  and  non-­‐American.    On  Box  Office  Mojo,  Avatar  (2009)  tops  the  list  of  all-­‐Ome  worldwide  grosses  making  more  than  two  billion  dollars  (“All  Time  Box  Office”).  The  central  visual  moOf  in  that  film  is  the  KabalisOc  tree  of  life,  which  is  a  symbol  for  interconnectedness.  The  Internet  anyone?  Is  it  a  coincidence  that  the  highest-­‐grossing  film  of  all-­‐Ome  across  the  world  is  a  spiritual  sci-­‐fi  film  that  sort  of  preaches  peace?  Brussat  and  Brussat  (2012)  in  their  analysis  of  the  film  write:  “Cameron  gives  the  People  an  Earth-­‐based  cosmology  that  is  totally  in  sync  with  contemporary  spirituality  movements:  reverence  for  Gaia  (earth)  as  a  living  being  and  the  Oneness  movement  that  celebraOng  the  interconnecOon  of  all  being”.    Tree  of  souls  from  Avatar  (Cameron,  2009).  
  • 25. Shawshank  Redemp<on  (Darabont,  1994)    is  #1  on  IMDB!  
  • 26. Avatar  (Cameron,  2009)    is  the  highest  grossing  film  of  all  Ome  worldwide  
  • 27. CriOcs  sOll  love  The  Wizard  of  Oz  (Fleming,  1939)  
  • 28. How  effecOve  is  TRANSCINEMA?  •  The  purpose  of  cinema  cannot  simply  be  mere  entertainment;  otherwise,  “the  most  selected  ‘alternaOve’  faith  on  the  Census  […]  in  England  and  Wales”  wouldn’t  be  Jediism,  which  is  a  result  of  the  influence  of  Star  Wars  on  the  collecOve  consciousness  (Taylor,  2012).  Why  would  The  Wizard  of  Oz,  a  film  made  in  1939,  get  a  100/100  raOng  by  criOcs  on  MetacriOc  (“Movie  Releases  by  Score”)  and  sOll  be  considered  relevant  by  criOcs  and  relatable  by  viewers  today?  Perhaps  because  there  are  spiritual  lessons  we  can  sOll  learn  from  it  seventy-­‐four  years  later?  Such  as:  “There’s  no  place  like  home.  The  kingdom  of  heaven  is  not  a  place;  but  a  condiOon”  or  that  “Truth  is  found  in  your  own  back  yard,”  and  others  (Johnson,  n.d.).  UlOmately,  “the  very  nature  of  any  creaOve  medium  can  be  viewed  as  being  transpersonal.  The  cinemaOc  medium,  as  well  as  all  the  arts,  is  ulOmately  the  ideas,  thoughts,  and  feelings  of  a  ‘‘personal’’  mind  (or  minds)  being  extended  outward  to  other  minds”,  as  stated  by  Kaplan  (2005),  and  the  key  thing  is  to  be  mindful  of  the  process  of  making  films  or  watching  them  so  as  to  be  able  to  use  the  experience  as  an  educaOonal  and  transformaOve  tool  for  personal  and  transpersonal  (or  collecOve)  growth  and  development.  Cinema  is  unique,  and  its  future  may  lie  in  transcinema,  but  at  the  moment  we  must  focus  on  its  transformaOve  purpose  parOcularly  aker  realizing  that  there  is  a  clear  longing  for  spiritual  themes  by  a  large  number  of  people.    Jediism  in  the  UK