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Project report

  1. 1. CONTENTPARTICULARS PAGE No.DECLARATIONCERTIFICATEEXECUTIVE SUMMARYINTRODUCTIONCOMPANY PROFILEPROJECT OBJECTIVELITERATURE REVIEWRESEARCH METHODOLOGYDATA ANALYSISINTERPRETATIONRECOMMENDATIONSCONCLUSION
  2. 2. DeclarationI, Mr. / Ms Hereby declare that this field work is the record of authentic work carried out byme during the period from 2011 to 2012 and has not been submitted to any otherUniversity or Institute for the award of any degree / diploma etc. Signature Anirudha A. Kelkar Name of the sutudent
  3. 3. CERTIFICATE This is to certify Mr. /Ms- Anirudha Arun Kelkar of MAEER’s MIT School of Managementhas successfully completed the Field Work titled on “CONSUMER ONLINE SHOPPINGAWARENESS AND SATISFACTION” in partial fulfillment of requirement for the completion OFMMM course as prescribed by the MAEER’s MIT School Of management. This field work report is the record of authentic carried out by him / her during the periodfrom 2011 to 2012. She/he has worked under my guidance.SignatureProf. Umesh PatwardhanProject Guide (Internal)Date:Counter Signed byBrig (Dr) R.K.BhatiaDirector: MIT School of ManagementDate
  4. 4. EXECUTIVE SUMMERYThe objective to study Online shopping with eBay. The study is to know about CONSUMERONLINE SHOPPING AWARENESS AND SATISFACTION . The method of data collection used was survey method & the data collection tool usedfor the survey was questionnaire. The sample population consists of the people who areworking professionals and students who used online shopping.RM Adopted : Random samplingSampling Element : local peopleSample Size : 50 peopleIn analysis of data section there are following items which are which are includedthey are:Findings:Conclusion:Recommendations are:
  5. 5. Introduction to Field StudyThis study examines consumer Awareness and Satisfaction - Online shopping in developingcountries. The exponential growth of internet penetration in India and increasedecommerce activity both on consumer side as well as corporate side during last few yearsprovides the impetus to investigate this phenomenon among potential online shoppers.Further, this channel of commerce brings a major technological shift in the way businessis conducted and raises challenges in terms of aligning the e-commerce model to thetraditional Indian socialistic psychological beliefs. The study tests a awareness andsatisfaction regarding internet shopping and exploring their effects on successful adoptionof Online shopping amongst working people and students.Customer acceptance of innovations necessitates behavioral research aimed atexamining and predicting actual behavior and behavioral intentions. Due to lowpenetration of internet in India (around 4% according to Business Today, 5.2% accordingto Nasscom’s projection for 2005 and 7.1% in November 2008 according to internetWorld Stats’ usage and populations statistics) as compared to other countries (China22.4%, Taiwan 66.1%), internet shopping can be considered as an innovation for theIndian customer.The success of internet auctioneers eBay, e-steel, Baazee and electronic retailing giantsAmazon.com etc. have demonstrated that internet medium is viable channel for bothtraditional as well as innovative business exchanges between retailers and their customers.Further, the e-business retail sales figures compiled and published, suggest that there is asteady growth in e-commerce activity.Other factors such as the continuous growth in the number of internet users andBroadband subscribers, and the rapid pace of technological improvements andinnovations also hold the promise for greater acceptance of the digital medium byconsumers (Malone, 2001).On the other side, internationally the rash of bankruptcies among internet retailers anddramatic declines in stock values of internet-related businesses few years back brought thesobering realization that along with the opportunities, electronic retailers also havechallenges including the task of identifying, attracting and retaining customers. By anymeasure, the run-up in the price and trading in internet-related stocks between 1998 andthe spring of 2000 was extraordinary.
  6. 6. The demise of thousands of internet businesses (like etoys) that bankedon slick websites and multi-million-rupees advertisement campaigns is a painful buteducative reminder that for all the hype, the internet is just another channel for business.Irrefutably, the digital channel offers some unique advantages over other mediaincluding interactive communications, rapid comparison shopping, lower transactioncosts, innovative arrangements for the sampling and consumption of digital products,and the elimination of time and spatial barriers.However, this new medium of commerce has its own drawbacks such as reducedopportunities for sensory shopping, social shopping, face-to-face interactions with salespersonnel, and the postponement of the consumption or enjoyment of tangible goods. Theinherent limitations of the internet have been compounded by poorly designed internetstorefronts, limited product selection, poor customer service, tedious checkout procedures,botched orders, tardy deliveries, security lapses, and privacy invasions.
  7. 7. Company Profile Have you noticed that whenever you open a newspaper, watch the TV or have aconversation, people seem to be talking about eBay? If youve never used it and youve noidea what its all about, then the chances are that youre starting to feel a little left out.So What is eBay?eBay is an online auction website - and not just any auction site, but thebiggest one in the world. If you know how an auction works, then youalready roughly know how eBay works. Someone adds something theywant to sell to the site, and then buyers come along and place bids on it.The highest bid wins the item! Its that simple.eBay being an online auction makes a big difference, though. Buying and selling are notreserved for any elite. eBay accepts almost any item, no matter how small, and will thenadvertise it on their sites all over the world. Its a powerful combination of an auction and aslightly chaotic marketplace.Yes, you read that correctly: 17 years. eBay was created in September1995, by a man named Pierre Omidyar, who was living in San Jose. Hewanted his site - then called AuctionWeb - to be an online marketplace,and wrote the first code for it in one weekend. It was one of the firstwebsites of its kind in the world. The name eBay comes from the domain Omidyar used forhis site. His companys name was Echo Bay, and the eBay AuctionWeb was originally justone part of Echo Bays website at ebay.com. The first thing ever sold on the site wasOmidyars broken laser pointer, which sold for $14.
  8. 8. The site quickly became massively popular, as sellers came to list all sorts of odd things andbuyers actually bought them. Relying on trust seemed to work remarkably well, and meantthat the site could almost be left alone to run itself. The site had been designed from thestart to collect a small fee on each sale, and it was this money that Omidyar used to pay forAuctionWebs expansion. The fees quickly added up to more than hiscurrent salary, and sohe decided to quit his job and work on the site fulltime. It was at this point, in 1996, that headded the feedback facilities, to let buyers and sellers rate each other and make buying andselling safer.In 1997, Omidyar changed AuctionWebs - and his companys - name toeBay, which is what people had been calling the site for a long time. Hebegan to spend a lot of money on advertising, and had the eBay logodesigned. It was in this year that the one-millionth item was sold (it was atoy version of Big Bird from Sesame Street).Then, in 1998 - the peak of the dotcom boom - eBay became big business,and theinvestment in Internet businesses at the time allowed it to bring in senior managers andbusiness strategists, who took in public on the stock market. It started to encourage peopleto sell more than just collectibles, and quickly became a massive site where you could sellanything, large or small. Unlike other sites, though, eBay survived the end of the boom, andis still going strong today.1999 saw eBay go worldwide, launching sites in the UK, Australia andGermany. eBay bought half.com, an Amazon-like online retailer, in the year 2000 - the sameyear it introduced Buy it Now - and bought PayPal, an online payment service, in 2002.Pierre Omidyar has now earned an estimated $3 billion from eBay, and still serves asChairman of the Board. There are now literally millions of items bought and sold every dayon eBay, all over the world. For every $100 spent online worldwide, it is estimated that $14is spent on eBay - thats a lot of laser pointers.In 1997, the company received $6.7 million in funding from the venture capital firmBenchmark Capital.Meg Whitman was hired as eBay President and CEO in March 1998. At the time, thecompany had 30 employees, half a million users and revenues of $4.7 million in the UnitedStates. eBay went public on September 21, 1998, and both Omidyar and Skoll becameinstant billionaires. eBays target share price of $18 was all but ignored as the price went to$53.50 on the first day of trading.As the company expanded product categories beyond collectibles into almost any saleableitem, business grew quickly. In February 2002, the company purchased IBazar, a similarEuropean auction web site founded in 1993 and then bought on October 14, 2002.In early 2008, the company had expanded worldwide, counted hundreds of millions ofregistered users, 15,000+ employees and revenues of almost $7.7 billion. After nearly ten
  9. 9. years at eBay, Whitman made the decision to enter politics. On January 23, 2008 thecompany announced that Whitman would step down on March 31, 2008 and John Donahoewas selected to become President and CEO. Whitman remained on the Board of Directorsand continued to advise Donahoe through 2008. In late 2009, eBay completed the sale ofSkype for $2.75 billion, but will still own 30% equity in the company.In July 2010, eBay was sued for $3.8 billion by XPRT Ventures that accused eBay of stealinginformation shared in confidence by the inventors on XPRTs own patents, and incorporatedit into features in its own payment systems, such as PayPal Pay Later and PayPal BuyerCredit.On December 20, 2010, eBay announced its acquisition of a German online shopping club,brands4friends.de, for €150 million ($197 million) to strengthen the companys interests inthe fashion industry in Europe. It is subject to regulatory approval and expected to close it inthe 2011www.ebay.in/www.ebay.com/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EBay
  10. 10. Objectives of StudyTesting awareness about Online Shopping.identifying shopping satisfaction among potential internet shoppers.evaluating the effect of a consumer’s shopping orientation on his/her PerceivedUsefulness for and Attitude towards using internet shopping.Evaluating the effect of a consumer’s Knowledge about internet shopping onHis/her Perceived Usefulness and Perceived Ease of Use of internet shopping.
  11. 11. REVIEW OF LITERATUREInternet shopping is still in evolutionary stage in India and very few studies haveundertaken research exploring customer acceptance and diffusion of internet shoppingin India. Although there has been a dearth of internet shopping related studies in Indiancontext, theoretical exploration can be based on various international studies carried outin other countries.As an initiative to explore the internet shopping acceptance and diffusion in India, thisStudy is relevant to predicting and explaining actual awareness andSatisfaction also intention of internet shopping. Literature Review on Shopping OrientationsAs a shopping behavior measure, shopping orientations are intended to capture themotivations of shoppers and/or the desired experiences and goals they seek whencompleting their shopping activities (Stone, 1954). For example, an in-home shoppermay be motivated by convenience, while a personalizing shopper may value theinteraction experience with a known sales clerk. Shopping orientations have alsoemerged as reliable discriminators for classifying different types of shoppers based ontheir approach to shopping activities (Gehrt and Carter, 1992; Lumpkin and Burnett,1991-92).Researchers have tapped into shopper orientations to study patronagebehavior among elderly consumers, catalog shoppers, outshoppers, and mall shoppers(Bloch et al., 1994; Evans et al., 1996; Gehrt and Shim, 1998; Korgaonkar, 1984;Lumpkin, 1985; Lumpkin et al., 1986; Shim and Mahoney, 1992).It is becoming increasingly clear that in order to survive and more importantly tosucceed, online merchants should embrace and actively pursue fundamental principlesof good retailing that apply to any medium. One of these principles is knowledge aboutexisting and potential customers and their preferences and behaviors.Shopping orientations have been shown to be reliable predictors of customer patronagebehavior35 in other retail formats such as catalog and mall shopping. Therefore, it is expected thatthe study of shopping orientations can also help electronic retailers identify andunderstand those consumers who prefer to shop online and the reasons why.
  12. 12. RESEARCH METHODOLOGYThis chapter discusses the research methodology adopted in separate sections.The first part discusses the scales used for developing the instrument (questionnaire) for theresearch.Next comes the data collection method including sampling and tools of datacollection. Last topic of the chapter outlines the descriptive characteristics of thecollected data. Scales Used and the InstrumentA two-page questionnaire was used as the research instrument. Attribute level scaleswere a combination of scales earlier used in similar other research.The full questionnaire was first pre-tested in an iterative manner among a conveniencesampleof colleagues and friends drawn from the general public. The 50 respondents in this testsample were asked to provide comments on the relevance and wording of thequestionnaire items, length of the survey, and time taken to complete it.Based on the feedback received, the questionnaire layout was modified, and the wording ofsome of the questions was changed to improve clarity.
  13. 13. Data Collection and SampleFollowing is a summary of the data collection strategy and the sample created out of that Sampling Element: Individual employees (Controlled for education, marital status, age group, gender, household income, the product shopped-internet Shopping) Geographical extent: Five areas of Pune city (Kothrud , Karvenagar , Sinhagad Road, Bhusari Colony, Varaje , Deccan etc.). These areas are representative of the target universe of this research Time: 5 Days Sampling Technique: Non-probability sampling technique (Convenience sampling) Sample size: 57 Respondents, 7 responses were discarded due to incompleteinformation or visibly manipulative data. Data Collection Instrument: The questionnaire developed from the scaleswas used as the instrument. The questionnaire covered the constructsproposed in the model and standard (and reliable) scales available were used formeasuring each construct. Separate statements covering the control variables wereadded towards the end of the questionnaire. Data collection process: The respondents were explained the purpose of the study inbrief and handed over the questionnaire for the duration of 2 days. The purposeof giving them the questionnaire for 2 days was to give them enough time tounderstand the questions and respond properly. At the end of this time, thequestionnaires were collected back.
  14. 14. Data AnalysisPercentage of people who know about Online Shopping-eBay StatisticsQ1N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean 1.06Median 1.00Mode 1Sum 53Percentiles 10 1.00 20 1.00 25 1.00 30 1.00 40 1.00 Q1 50 1.00 Cumulative 60 1.00 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Percent 70 1.00 Valid Yes 47 94.0 94.0 94.0 75 1.00 No 3 6.0 6.0 100.0 80 1.00 Total 50 100.0 100.0 90 1.00
  15. 15. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Frequencies- Information received about eBay from various sources. StatisticsQ2N Valid 50 Missing 0 Q2 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Freinds or Relarives 19 38.0 38.0 44.0 Banner Ad 2 4.0 4.0 48.0 2,4 1 2.0 2.0 50.0 Magazine 4 8.0 8.0 58.0 TV Ad 6 12.0 12.0 70.0 Other 15 30.0 30.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  16. 16. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Frequencies - MAIN Reason to Visit eBay StatisticsQ3N Valid 50 Missing 0 Q3 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Browsing 17 34.0 34.0 40.0 1,2 1 2.0 2.0 42.0 Particular Item 8 16.0 16.0 58.0 Comparison of Prices 18 36.0 36.0 94.0 Other 3 6.0 6.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  17. 17. Frequencies / Easiness of the web site. StatisticsQ4N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean 1.02Median 1.00Mode 1Sum 51Percentiles 10 1.00 20 1.00 25 1.00 30 1.00 40 1.00 50 1.00 60 1.00 70 1.00 75 1.00 80 1.00 90 1.00 Q4 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid not applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Easy 43 86.0 86.0 92.0 Difficult 4 8.0 8.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  18. 18. Frequencies / Difficulty level in Searching items on the Website. StatisticsQ5N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean 1.88Median 2.00Mode 2Sum 94Percentiles 10 1.00 20 2.00 25 2.00 30 2.00 40 2.00 50 2.00 60 2.00 70 2.00 75 2.00 80 2.00 90 3.00 Q5 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid 0 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Very Easy 6 12.0 12.0 18.0 Easy 35 70.0 70.0 88.0 Difficult 6 12.0 12.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  19. 19. Frequencies / Rating for eBay inventory StatisticsQ6N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean 2.38Median 2.00Mode 2Sum 119Percentiles 10 2.00 20 2.00 25 2.00 30 2.00 40 2.00 50 2.00 60 2.00 70 3.00 75 3.00 80 3.00 90 4.00 Q6 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid not applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Insufficient 1 2.0 2.0 8.0 Average 27 54.0 54.0 62.0 Adequate 12 24.0 24.0 86.0 Mmore than sufficient 7 14.0 14.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  20. 20. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Purpose of Purchase Online StatisticsQ7N Valid 50 Missing 0 Q7 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid Not applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Personal 24 48.0 48.0 54.0 1,2 3 6.0 6.0 60.0 Gift 13 26.0 26.0 86.0 Other 7 14.0 14.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  21. 21. Frequencies/ Method of Payment StatisticsQ8N Valid 50 Missing 0 Q8 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid Not applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Credit Card 12 24.0 24.0 30.0 1,2 1 2.0 2.0 32.0 Debit Card 21 42.0 42.0 74.0 2,4 1 2.0 2.0 76.0 Cheque 1 2.0 2.0 78.0 Net Banking 6 12.0 12.0 90.0 Other 5 10.0 10.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  22. 22. Frequencies/ Shipping satisfaction StatisticsQ9N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean 1.30Median 1.00Mode 1Sum 65Percentiles 10 1.00 20 1.00 25 1.00 30 1.00 40 1.00 50 1.00 60 1.00 70 1.00 75 2.00 80 2.00 90 2.90 Q9 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid Not applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Satisfy 34 68.0 68.0 74.0 Very Satisfy 8 16.0 16.0 90.0 Dissatisfied 5 10.0 10.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  23. 23. Frequencies/ Order completion StatisticsQ10N Valid 50 Q10 Missing 0 Frequenc Valid CumulativeMean 1.04 y Percent Percent PercentMedian 1.00 Valid Not 3 6.0 6.0 6.0Mode 1 ApplicableSum 52 Yes 42 84.0 84.0 90.0Percentiles 10 1.00 No 5 10.0 10.0 100.0 20 1.00 Total 50 100.0 100.0 25 1.00 30 1.00 40 1.00 50 1.00 60 1.00 70 1.00 75 1.00 80 1.00 90 1.90
  24. 24. Frequencies / Percentage of return order because of any reason Statistics Q11 Cumulative Frequency Percent Valid Percent PercentValid Not applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Yes 9 18.0 18.0 24.0 No 38 76.0 76.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  25. 25. Frequencies / Reason for returning order StatisticsQ12N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean .70Median .00Mode 0Sum 35Percentiles 10 .00 20 .00 25 .00 30 .00 40 .00 50 .00 60 .00 70 .00 75 .00 80 .80 90 4.00 Q12 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid Not Applicable 40 80.0 80.0 80.0 Wrong Size 2 4.0 4.0 84.0 Wrong Color 1 2.0 2.0 86.0 Not What I Ordered 1 2.0 2.0 88.0 Damaged 3 6.0 6.0 94.0 Not Satisfied with Item 2 4.0 4.0 98.0 Other 1 2.0 2.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  26. 26. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  27. 27. Frequencies / Satisfaction after return process StatisticsQ13N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean .60Median .00Mode 0Sum 30Percentiles 10 .00 20 .00 25 .00 30 .00 40 .00 50 .00 60 .00 70 .00 75 .00 80 .80 90 3.90 Q13 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid Not applicable 40 80.0 80.0 80.0 Very Satisfied 2 4.0 4.0 84.0 Somewhat Satisfied 2 4.0 4.0 88.0 Satisfied 1 2.0 2.0 90.0 Somewhat Dissatisfied 4 8.0 8.0 98.0 5 1 2.0 2.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  28. 28. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  29. 29. Frequencies/ Online store preference reason StatisticsQ14N Valid 50 Missing 0 Q14 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid Not Applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Price 8 16.0 16.0 22.0 1,2 1 2.0 2.0 24.0 1,4 1 2.0 2.0 26.0 Availability of Item 7 14.0 14.0 40.0 Selection 11 22.0 22.0 62.0 Ease of Comparison 10 20.0 20.0 82.0 4,5 1 2.0 2.0 84.0 Payment Options 6 12.0 12.0 96.0 5,2 1 2.0 2.0 98.0 Other 1 2.0 2.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  30. 30. Frequencies / Overall Experience StatisticsQ15N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean 2.34Median 2.00Mode 2Sum 117Percentiles 10 1.10 20 2.00 25 2.00 30 2.00 40 2.00 50 2.00 60 3.00 70 3.00 75 3.00 80 3.00 90 3.00 Q15 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid Not Applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Disappointing 2 4.0 4.0 10.0 Average 22 44.0 44.0 54.0 Good 21 42.0 42.0 96.0 Delightful 2 4.0 4.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  31. 31. Frequencies / People Willing to continue online shopping StatisticsQ16N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean 1.02Median 1.00Mode 1Sum 51Percentiles 10 1.00 20 1.00 25 1.00 30 1.00 40 1.00 50 1.00 60 1.00 70 1.00 75 1.00 80 1.00 90 1.00 Q16 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent Not Applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Yes 43 86.0 86.0 92.0 No 4 8.0 8.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0
  32. 32. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  33. 33. Frequencies / Percentage of recommendation online shopping to others StatisticsQ17N Valid 50 Missing 0Mean 1.02Median 1.00Mode 1Sum 51Percentiles 10 1.00 20 1.00 25 1.00 30 1.00 40 1.00 50 1.00 60 1.00 70 1.00 75 1.00 80 1.00 90 1.00 Q17 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative PercentValid Not Applicable 3 6.0 6.0 6.0 Yes 43 86.0 86.0 92.0 No 4 8.0 8.0 100.0 Total 50 100.0 100.0

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