Windows Resource Guide

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Windows Resource Guide

  1. 1. How to Use Microsoft Windows What is Microsoft Windows?................................................................................................................................................2 The “Desktop”...................................................................................................................................................................2 The Task Bar......................................................................................................................................................................2 The Start Menu......................................................................................................................................................................4 Opening programs from the Start menu...........................................................................................................................5 The Search box..................................................................................................................................................................5 Customize the Start menu.................................................................................................................................................7 Desktop Background.............................................................................................................................................................7 Changing your Desktop background: (due to system restrictions we can’t do this in class)..............................................7 Desktop Icons........................................................................................................................................................................7 Keyboard Shortcuts...............................................................................................................................................................8 Windows...............................................................................................................................................................................8 Moving Windows...............................................................................................................................................................9 Resizing a Window..........................................................................................................................................................10 Working with Files and Folders...........................................................................................................................................10 Creating Files...................................................................................................................................................................11 Creating a Folder.............................................................................................................................................................12 Moving Folders and Files.................................................................................................................................................13 Copying Folders and Files................................................................................................................................................14 Saving a File into a Folder................................................................................................................................................14 Deleting Folders and Files................................................................................................................................................15 Renaming a Folder or File................................................................................................................................................15 Creating a Shortcut..........................................................................................................................................................15 Cut, Copy, and Paste............................................................................................................................................................16 Cut and Paste..................................................................................................................................................................16 Copying text or objects is similar to cutting it, but it does not remove the selected items. ...........................................16 Games.................................................................................................................................................................................16 Printing a Document............................................................................................................................................................17
  2. 2. How to Use Microsoft Windows Prepared by Jim Vincent for classes at Maring-Hunt Library June, 2009 The Microsoft Windows Vista Help site on the internet has very good learning aids. The address is “windowshelp.microsoft.com”. What is Microsoft Windows? Microsoft Windows is a computer operating system and a graphical interface to your computer. Many other parts of the operating system are beyond the scope of this class. There are other computer operating systems. Some of them are special purpose. And there are many versions of Microsoft Windows. In this class you will be using Microsoft Windows XP Professional. Most of us will use a “home” version of Microsoft Windows. The most common version is Microsoft Windows XP Home. A newer version, which you may find on any new computer you buy, is Windows Vista, which also comes in several versions. Another version of Windows – Windows 7 – is already being tested by computer program developers. We will be talking about basic commands today, so they should be the same or very similar in the various versions of Windows. In the rest of this document we will call Microsoft Windows just simply “Windows” for simplicity. Other operating systems include the Mac Operating system which is used on Macintosh computers. Another operating system is UNIX, and an offshoot is called Linux. These systems are used for commercial applications and servers such as web servers. There is a Windows Mobile operating system for handheld devices, and there are several other operating systems for handheld devices. This class will concentrate on the graphical interface to the computer, which is what you as a computer user will be interfacing with most of the time. Besides providing a graphical, easy to use interface to your computer, the operating system is software (a computer program) that makes your computer hardware work. Without an operating system your computer wouldn’t work. Now let’s look at the Windows desktop and its various parts. The “Desktop” The desktop is the main screen area that you see after you turn on your computer and log on to Windows. Like the top of your desk, it serves as a place for your work. When you open programs or folders, they appear on the desktop. You can also put things on the desktop, such as files and folders, and arrange them however you want. You should be looking at the “Desktop” now. The Task Bar The Task Bar is at the bottom of Desktop. It usually consists of at least three areas, but it can be customized in several ways. Here is a picture of a task bar: On the right side of the Task Bar is an area known as the “System Tray”. It shows programs that are running in the “background”. They are programs that are running on your computer “by themselves”. You will interact with them only if point and click on one of the icons. If you point at an icon with your mouse you will see what the icon represents. If you point and right click you will see several options. Usually that includes exiting the program. You have the option of
  3. 3. How to Use Microsoft Windows hiding some of the icons that are inactive. If that option has been chosen, you can see the inactive icons by clicking on the left pointing arrow. The time and date usually appear on the right of the system tray. A common icon in this area is a speaker. See if you can find it and point to it. It says “Volume”. Right click on it. Does it say “Open Volume Control” and “Adjust Audio Properties”? Here you can adjust the volume of your computer speakers or mute them. Many keyboards have special keys for muting the volume, too. The System Tray can be customized, just like most Windows features. Find a blank area of the tray and right click for options. We can’t do that on your computers, and you don’t often need to change it, so we won’t spend more time on this feature today. But be aware that the System Tray can be customized. The left area of the Task Bar has the Start Button. More about that later. To the right of the start button the Task Bar may show some icons for programs you use often. This is called the “Quick Launch” area. You can open programs shown with one click. You can customize this area by right-clicking in it and clicking “Open” on the menu. You can also click and drag programs from your desktop to this area. I like to have the Windows Calculator in my “Quick Launch” area, because I often want to use the calculator while I using other programs. I will show you how to do this. Because of restrictions, you probably can’t do it on your training computer. For help in doing this, search Windows help for “Quick Launch”. Remember, to get Windows Help at any time, press the Windows key and F1. (F1 by itself will show help for your current program). The next area of the Task Bar shows the programs you have open. One of the ways of switching to a different program or file that is open is to go to the Task Bar and clicking on the program or file. (Another way is to press Alt-Tab, which will cycle you through all of your open programs.) An option that I find useful is to set the task bar so that it appears only when you point to the bottom of the Desktop. That way it doesn’t occupy space on the Desktop when you don’t need it. To change the way the task bar behaves, click on Properties. You should get this menu: The “Auto-hide” box is checked, along with “Keep the taskbar on top …). There are other options, as you can see. The “Quick Launch” area shows programs you want to start with one click on the task bar. Put shortcuts to frequently used programs or files here by dragging a shortcut from the desktop to this area. Because of restrictions on what we can do on these computers, we can’t try this. Page 3 of 17
  4. 4. How to Use Microsoft Windows The Start Menu The Start Menu button is on the left corner of your Task Bar. Click on it now. (You can also press the Windows logo key on your keyboard.) The Start menu appears. The Vista Start menu is on the right. The Start menu is the main gateway to your computer's programs, folders, and settings. It's called a menu because it provides a list of choices, just as a restaurant menu does. And as "Start" implies, it's often the place that you'll go to start or open things. Use the Start menu to do these common activities: • Start programs • Open commonly used folders • Search for files, folders, and programs • Adjust computer settings • Get help with the Windows operating system • Turn off the computer • Log off from Windows or switch to a different user account The XP Start menu is divided into three basic parts: The top left pane shows a list of “pinned” programs on your computer. This list can be customized. See the handout on Customizing Your Start Menu for details. In the lower left pane are recently used programs. You can open any of these programs by clicking on the icon on the left. The right pane provides access to commonly used folders, files, settings, and features. The bottom part has buttons that let you log off or shut down your computer. The “Turn Off Computer” button gives you additional choices before you actually shut down the computer. The “Log Off” button allows you to switch users. We will not take time to review the process of setting up additional users. But by setting up different users, you can have different start menus, and other settings can be different. So if you share your computer with others at home or work, you may want to explore the use of different user accounts. For help on setting up user accounts, click on “Help and Support” in the Start Menu and then search on “User Accounts Overview”. Page 4 of 17
  5. 5. How to Use Microsoft Windows Opening programs from the Start menu One of the most common uses of the Start menu is opening programs installed on your computer. To open a program shown in the left pane of the Start menu, click it. The program opens and the Start menu closes. If you don't see the program you want to open, click All Programs at the bottom of the left pane. The left pane displays a long list of programs and folders: Clicking one of the program icons launches the program, and the Start menu closes. So what's inside the folders? More programs. Click Accessories, for example, and a list of programs that are stored in that folder appears. Click Notepad to open it. Leave Notepad open for now. If you're ever unsure what a program does, move the pointer over its icon or name. A box appears that often contains a description of the program. Point to Calculator to see the message that Windows displays. Pointing to an item displays information about it You might notice that over time, the lists of programs in your Start menu change. This happens for two reasons. First, when you install new programs, they get added to the All Programs list. Second, the Start menu detects which programs you use the most and it places them in the left pane for quick access. See the separate handout “Customizing Your Start Menu” to see how to organize your programs. The Search box Vista has a search box like the one below. Windows XP has a search icon in the right pane of the start menu. But with either system, you can open the search dialog by clicking on desktop and pressing Windows-F. It is one of the most convenient ways to find things on your computer. The exact location of the items doesn't matter—the Search box will scour your programs and all of the folders in “My Documents” or, in Vista, your “Personal Folder” (which includes Documents, Pictures, Music, Desktop, and other common locations). It will also search your e-mail messages, saved instant messages, appointments, and contacts. The Start menu Search box for Windows Vista Page 5 of 17
  6. 6. How to Use Microsoft Windows A program, file, or folder will appear as a search result if: • Any word in its title matches or begins with your search term. • Any text in the actual contents of the file—such as the text in a word-processing document—matches or begins with your search term. • Any word in a property of the file, such as the author, matches or begins with your search term. (For more information about file properties, see View the properties for a file.) Click any search result to open it. Or, click the Clear button to clear the search results and return to the main programs list. You can also click Search Everywhere to search your entire computer; or Search the Internet to open your web browser and search the Internet for your term. Besides programs, files and folders, and communications, the Search box also looks through your Internet favorites and the history of websites you've visited. If any of these web pages include the search term, they appear under a heading called "Favorites and History." What's in the right pane? The right pane of the Start menu contains links to parts of Windows that you're likely to use frequently. Here they are, from top to bottom: • Personal folder or “My Documents”. This opens your personal folder, which is named for whoever is currently logged on to Windows. For example, if the current user is Molly Clark, the folder will be named Molly Clark. This folder, in turn, contains user-specific files, including the Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos folders. • Documents. Opens the Documents folder, where you can store and open text files, spreadsheets, presentations, and other kinds of documents. • Pictures. Opens the Pictures folder, where you can store and view digital pictures and graphics files. • Music. Opens the Music folder, where you can store and play music and other audio files. • Games. Opens the Games folder, where you can access all of the games on your computer. • Recent Items. Opens a list of files you've opened recently. Click one of the files in the list to open it. • Computer. Opens a window where you can access disk drives, cameras, printers, scanners, and other hardware connected to your computer. • Network. Opens a window where you can access the computers and devices on your network. • Connect To. Opens a window where you can connect to a new network. • Control Panel. Opens Control Panel, where you can customize the appearance and functionality of your computer, add or remove programs, set up network connections, and manage user accounts. Page 6 of 17
  7. 7. How to Use Microsoft Windows • Help and Support. Opens Windows Help and Support, where you can browse and search Help topics about using Windows and your computer. Customize the Start menu You can control which items appear in the Start menu. For example, you can add icons for your favorite programs to the Start menu for easy access, or remove programs from the list. An accompanying handout explains how to customize the Start Menu. Desktop Background Most users have a background, also known as wallpaper, on their desktop. A Windows desktop can be like your desk – pretty clean – or pretty messy. Here is a picture of a computer desktop – pretty messy! This desktop has a lot of icons on it. It also has a clock on it. That is called an applet – or a very small program that usually does only one thing. You can also see a heron in the White River. This is a picture that the user took and used as the background. Changing your Desktop background: (due to system restrictions we can’t do this in class) Point to a blank spot on your computer desktop. Right click. Click on “Properties”. This screen should appear. Click on “Desktop” on the tab at the top. Choose from the list of choices, or to use your own pictures as a desktop, click on Browse. Then “browse” to the folder where you have pictures stored (usually My Pictures or Shared Pictures) and choose the picture you want. Suggestion – choose the picture you want as a desktop before you start this process. It will be easier if you know which picture you want to use and where it is. Desktop Icons Icons are small pictures that represent files, folders, programs, and other items. When you first start Windows, you'll see at least one icon on your desktop: the Recycle Bin (more on that later). Your computer manufacturer might have added other icons to the desktop. Some examples of desktop icons are shown below. Page 7 of 17
  8. 8. How to Use Microsoft Windows Later we will create a shortcut icon. The following material has been copied from (and freely edited) “Basic Computer Skills – Level 2” prepared by Jackson County, Indiana Public Library. Keyboard Shortcuts Use shortcut keys as an alternative to the mouse when working in Windows. You can open, close, and navigate the Start menu, desktop, menus, dialog boxes, and Web pages using keyboard shortcuts. Keyboard shortcuts may also make it easier for you to interact with your computer. In most programs an underlined letter in a command name on an open menu will carry out the corresponding command. “ALT+Underlined letter” will carry out the corresponding command or select the corresponding option if a menu isn’t open. Try this as we go along. You can find a comprehensive list of Windows keyboard shortcuts in Windows Help. Press +F1 for Windows Help. In the search bar type “Windows Keyboard Shortcuts” and press enter. Choose “Windows Keyboard Shortcuts Overview”. If you think you will refer to this often, you can add it to your Favorites menu. Then when you bring up help, click on the Favorites icon on the Menu bar. Some common shortcuts are listed on a separate handout. A list of some common keyboard shortcuts is on a separate handout. Windows Windows are the frames used by many programs used on computers with the Windows operating system. There are several parts to a window within Microsoft Windows. The basic window components will remain the same or at least similar regardless of the particular program or window being used. Navigation in Windows based software becomes much easier once these basic window parts have been learned. Open WordPad to view some of the parts of a Window. Click on Start, All Programs, Accessories, WordPad. These common window elements can be found in almost every program that runs in Windows: Page 8 of 17
  9. 9. How to Use Microsoft Windows Horizontal Scroll Bar – The left and right arrow buttons and the bar at the bottom of document window allow movement through a document from side to side. Maximize/Restore Button – This button acts like a toggle button. Clicking this button shrinks the window down just enough to see the desktop then clicking the button a second time will restore the window to the full size of the monitor screen. Minimize Button – This button hides the window from view so that the desktop or another program can be viewed. To restore the window to view, click on the Taskbar icon that represents the minimized program (if it is the only program in use it will be located just right of the Start Button). Program Close Button – This is the top right button on the title bar. This will close the program. Title Bar – Every window in Windows has a title bar that lets you know the name of the program you are using as well as the file name. Tool Tip – a tool tip is a short description that pops up after the mouse has been held over an icon or item for a short period of time. Vertical Scroll Bar - The up and down arrow buttons and the bar at the side of a document window that allows moving through a document from top to bottom. Moving Windows Sometimes it will be necessary to move a window to another part of the screen. To do this, follow these steps: 1. Click and hold down the left mouse button on the Title Bar of the Window that needs to be moved. Page 9 of 17
  10. 10. How to Use Microsoft Windows 2. With the mouse button still held down, drag the mouse to where the window is to be placed. 3. Release the mouse button. The window will now stay in the new location. Resizing a Window It may also become necessary to change the size of a window so that another program or document can be viewed at the same time. To do this, follow these steps: 1. Move the mouse pointer to the corner of the window that needs to be resized. When the pointer is positioned correctly the arrow will become a double headed arrow. Resizing Arrow 2. When this resizing arrow appears, click and hold down the left mouse button. 3. With the left mouse button still held down, drag the mouse pointer until the window is resized as desired. Working with Files and Folders Data that is entered into the computer is saved for future use in what is known as Files and Folders. Files and Folders can be created, renamed, copied, moved, and deleted as needed. Files consist of two parts: the file name and the file extension. Files should be given meaningful names so that the type of data stored in the file can easily be determined from the file name. The file extension consists of three characters that are preceded by a period (.) and indicate the type of document. File extensions are associated with programs so that the computer will know what program to use to open the file. Examples of file names and extensions include: winword.exe, excel.exe, audiobooks.mdb, welcome.doc, butterfly.jpg. Microsoft Windows uses a hierarchical approach to storing files and folders. The location of a file or folder is referred to as its path on the computer. C:Program FilesMicrosoft OfficeOfficewinword.exe is an example of a path for the file winword.exe. The path A:lettersMay 2005welcome.txt tells where to find the file welcome.txt which is being stored on drive A:, the floppy disk drive. Refer to the figure below for an example of a Windows Explorer Tree View of stored files. Page 10 of 17
  11. 11. How to Use Microsoft Windows Drives Folders Windows comes with some predefined folders. You can see “My Documents” above. In Vista, it is called “Personal Folder”. In “My Documents” are “My Pictures”, and “My Music”. Programs you install may add “My” folders. You will usually keep any folders you create in “My Folders”, or in “Shared Documents”. When you have multiple users on a computer, a user can not normally see another user’s folders and files. The user can, however, see folders and files stored in “Shared Documents”. The “My Documents” folder usually shows up at the top of any file listing. Creating Files Let’s create some practice files in My Documents to use in learning about files and folders. In our classroom we can’t access “My Documents” on Drive C. So let’s start by creating a folder called “My Documents” on Drive A, which should contain a “floppy” disk. Create a shortcut to this folder on the desktop. Click the Start button in the lower left corner of the Desktop. Click on All Programs and then select Accessories from the sub-menu that appears. Click on WordPad and a WordPad Document window will open. Type Best Pot Roast at the top of the page. Click File in the menu bar and then click on Save As from the menu that appears. The Save As dialog box should appear. Select A: “My Documents”. In the File Name edit box, type in the following name for this file: Best Pot Roast. After typing in the file name, click the Save button. The document has now been saved in the default location, My Documents, with the file name Best Pot Roast. Close this document. Repeat steps 1-9, except type title as and save file as Christmas Letter 2009. Page 11 of 17
  12. 12. How to Use Microsoft Windows Creating a Folder Creating categorized folders can make it easier to find a specific file when needed. Follow these steps to create a new folder in My Documents. 1. Double click the My Documents icon on the Desktop. 2. Click File. 3. Click New. 4. Click Folder. 5. A new folder will appear on the right side of the My Documents window with the words New Folder highlighted indicating it is ready to be given a specific name. New Folder is created and ready to be named 6. Press the Backspace key on the keyboard to delete the words New Folder and then type Recipes for the name of the new folder to be created. 7. Press the Enter key on the keyboard to save the new name for this folder. 8. The new folder Recipes should now appear in the list as illustrated below. New folder named Recipes Page 12 of 17
  13. 13. How to Use Microsoft Windows 9. Another way to add a new folder is to click on the Make a new folder option under File and Folder Tasks. Again, a new folder will appear on the right side of the My Documents window with the words New Folder highlighted indicating it is ready to be given a specific name. 10. Press the Backspace key on the keyboard to delete the words New Folder and then type Christmas Letters for the name of the new folder to be created. 11. Press the Enter key on the keyboard to save the new name for this folder. 12. The new folder Christmas Letters should now appear in the list of files shown in My Documents. Moving Folders and Files Sometimes folders and files need to be moved to different folders or storage locations. Use the following steps to move a file or folder from one location to another. 1. In this example, the file Best Pot Roast will be moved to the Recipes folder. With My Documents open, select the Best Pot Roast file by clicking on the file one time with the left mouse button. 2. Click Edit from the Menu Bar. 3. Click the Move to folder option and the following dialog box will appear: 4. Click the plus sign (+) next to My Documents to see the list of folders stored here. (Note: If a minus sign (-) appears next to My Documents, you can already see the list of folders. You are ready to go to the next step.) 5. Click on the Recipes folder. 6. The dialog box should look similar to the one pictured to the right: 7. Click the Move button. Page 13 of 17
  14. 14. How to Use Microsoft Windows 8. The file is moved to the new location and the folder view is seen again. Click the X in the top right corner of the folder window to close the window. This same procedure can be used to move any file or folder on the computer. Another way to move a file into a folder is to use drag and drop. Try this by clicking on the file Christmas Letter 2008. Keeping the mouse button held down, drag the file to the Christmas Letters folder, then release the mouse button. Copying Folders and Files The above process can also be used for copying a folder or file to another location. The difference is that instead of selecting Move to folder in Step 3, Copy to folder is selected and instead of clicking on the Move button in Step 7, the Copy button is clicked. Saving a File into a Folder After you have created folders in My Documents, you can save new files directly into the appropriate folder, rather than saving the file to My Documents and then moving it into the desired folder. 1. Open WordPad like we did to create our other practice files by first clicking the Start button, then All Programs, then selecting Accessories, and clicking on WordPad. 2. Type Snickerdoodles at the top of the page. 3. Click File from the menu bar. Then click on Save As from the menu that appears. 4. The Save As dialog box should appear. 5. Click the My Documents option on the left side of the dialog box. 6. Double click on the folder Recipes. Snickerdoodles is being saved directly in Recipes instead of in 7. In the File Name edit box, type in the following name for this file: Snickerdoodles. 8. After typing in the file name, click the Save button. 9. The document has now been saved in the folder Recipes, with the file name Snickerdoodles. Page 14 of 17
  15. 15. How to Use Microsoft Windows Deleting Folders and Files Sometimes a folder or file is no longer needed. Follow these steps to delete. 1. In this example, the file Snickerdoodles will be deleted. With the Recipes folder open, select the Snickerdoodles.rtf file by clicking on the file one time with the left mouse button. 2. Click File from the Menu bar. 3. Click Delete from the menu that appears. 4. The Confirm File Delete dialog box appears. Click the Yes button to complete the deletion process. 5. The file is deleted from this location and moved to the Recycle Bin and the folder view is seen again. Click the X in the top right corner of the folder window to close the window. ***If a file gets deleted by mistake, double click the Recycle Bin icon on the Desktop. Select (click) the file that was deleted by mistake and click the Restore this item option on the left side of the window. The file will be moved back to its original location. Renaming a Folder or File Sometimes it may be necessary to rename a folder or file. To do this: 1. Right click the Folder or File that needs renamed. 2. Choose Rename from the menu that appears. 3. The name of the file will become highlighted with a box around it and there will be a blinking cursor in the box. This indicates that the file is ready to be renamed. Just delete the name that is highlighted and type the new name for the folder or file. ***A word of caution: When renaming a file make sure the file extension (.doc, .xls, .txt, etc.) does not get deleted. If the file extension gets deleted the computer will not know what program to use to open the file and it will become useless. Let’s rename the file Best Pot Roast to Mom’s Pot Roast. 1. Locate the Best Pot Roast file by double clicking the Recipes folder. 2. Right click the Best Pot Roast file and click the Rename option from the menu that appears. 3. Use the mouse to highlight just the part of the name that needs changed (Best). 4. Type in the new part of the name (Mom’s) in front of the words Pot Roast. 5. Press the Enter key on the keyboard. The new file name (Mom’s Pot Roast) is saved and should show in the list of folders and files. Creating a Shortcut Folders and Files that are used often can have a Shortcut to the folder or file placed on the Desktop for easy access. This saves time and steps when trying to locate the folder or file. Page 15 of 17
  16. 16. How to Use Microsoft Windows To create a Shortcut, follow these steps: 1. Open the folder that contains the file or folder that needs a Shortcut. Make sure the folder window is not maximized. Part of the Desktop should be showing behind the open folder window. 2. Right click the file and drag the mouse pointer to any area of the Desktop. 3. Release the mouse button and click the Create Shortcut Here option from the menu that appears. 4. The Shortcut will appear on the Desktop and the folder window can be closed by clicking the X in the top right corner. Try creating a shortcut for the Mom’s Pot Roast file used in the last exercise. Cut, Copy, and Paste Cutting and Pasting refers to the act of moving (cutting) information from one area and adding (pasting) it to another area. These are the “Cut”, “Paste” and “Copy” icons Cut and Paste 1. Open WordPad. 2. At the top of the page, type your name. 3. Press the Enter key on the keyboard three times. 4. Type a simple sentence, such as “Today is Tuesday.” 5. Position the cursor to the left of your name. 6. Click the left mouse button and drag the mouse to the right, highlighting your entire name. 7. After your name is highlighted, release the mouse button and click the Cut button. It will disappear from the screen. Don’t worry; it has been stored in the computer’s internal Clipboard. 8. Position the cursor immediately after the remaining sentence and click the left mouse button. This moves the cursor to this location. Press Enter on the keyboard 2 times. 9. Click on the Paste button. Your name is placed below the sentence, where the cursor was located. Copying text or objects is similar to cutting it, but it does not remove the selected items. Games Windows comes with several computer games. One of the most popular ones is “FreeCell”. FreeCell and some of the other games require you to use the mouse a lot, so they are good practice for using the mouse. Be aware, however, that the games may be addictive. Open FreeCell by clicking on Start, Programs, Accessories, Games and then FreeCell. A nice thing about the Windows FreeCell program is that it keeps statistics on your wins and losses, so you can track how you are doing. Click Game, then Statistics to see if anyone has played FreeCell on your computer. Note that if you replay a Page 16 of 17
  17. 17. How to Use Microsoft Windows game that you lost, the replay is not counted. So you can keep replaying until you win if you want to. Rumor has it that every FreeCell game can be won. Printing a Document To print a document in WordPad or NotePad follow these steps: 1. With the document open (for this example use the Copy and Paste file used in the previous section), click File on the Menu Bar followed by Print in the menu that appears. 2. The Print dialog box should appear. In the Select Printer section, choose the correct printer if it is not already selected. 3. In the Number of copies section enter the correct number of copies to be printed. 4. Click the Print button at the bottom of the dialog box. 5. Click the X in the upper right corner of the document window to close the open file. If asked to save the file, click No. These steps will work in most Windows based programs. Page 17 of 17

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