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Welcome to the 2007 3rd
 

Welcome to the 2007 3rd

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  • Syndication of audio or video is the defining characteristic of a podcast. Podcasting is most often associated with audio. Podcasting and audioblogging are the same thing.
  • Syndication of audio or video is the defining characteristic of a podcast. Podcasting is most often associated with audio. Podcasting and audioblogging are the same thing.
  • Doc Searls is the editor of Linux Journal.
  • Dave Winer, founder of the Userland software and fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard; responsible for scriptingNews and RSS 2.0.
  • Adam Curry, an ex MTV VJ is sometimes referred to as the Podfather for coining the term and for serving as an advocate for the technology. Friends with Dave Winer.
  • Opportunities: -Become an expert on podcasts and teach others how to create them -Use it as a means to promote your expertise and build a reputation as an expert on a topic -Use it as a means to build community and communicate to friends and family
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Personal computer (Mac or PC) Audio Software -Audacity is free for Mac -Access Pro Tools on the 8th floor of the KU
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • There are high charges for no-shows and ANY kind of damage to your equipment. Be sure that you are VERY DETAILED in your examination of anything you borrow. Scroll to bottom of page and click “agree.” Select what you want to reserve. Choose dates. Enter personal information and reserve.
  • Scroll to bottom of page and click “agree.” Select what you want to reserve. Choose dates. Enter personal information and reserve.
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • RSS 1.0 = “RDF Site Summary;” RDF = a web standard for meta data …
  • RSS 1.0 = “RDF Site Summary;” RDF = a web standard for meta data …
  • RSS 1.0 = “RDF Site Summary;” RDF = a web standard for meta data …
  • RSS 1.0 = “RDF Site Summary;” RDF = a web standard for meta data …
  • RSS 1.0 = “RDF Site Summary;” RDF = a web standard for meta data …
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”
  • Orange RSS buttons
  • Tracks that can be used legally on podcasts are called “podsafe”

Welcome to the 2007 3rd Welcome to the 2007 3rd Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome to the 2007 3rd Creativity and Computation LAB!
  • Gandhi believed in always breathing through your nose, and eating many chocolate covered almonds. You should too!
  • We will spend today’s session going over three things:
    • A brief intro to podcasting
    • RSS (code for podcast syndication)
    • Simple sound recording and manipulation
  • Python workshops, for those of you who need extra help, will be held: Weds Sept 19th 6pm for desperate people Weds Sept 26th 6pm for less desperate people
  • The first Python quiz will be on Tuesday October 2nd , in the lecture Not on Tuesday September 25th
  • WHAT IS PODCASTING?
  • First, ignore the hyperlinks in this PowerPoint-- many don’t work. You can find links on the CC Lab site: http://a.parsons.edu/cclabs/podcasting
  • Podcast Definition
    • A podcast is a syndicated audio or video communication distributed via the Internet.
  • And now for something completely different: Podcasting (Thanks to Beth Cherry, who put a lot of time in preparing parts of this presentation!) Podcast = syndication No syndication != podcast
  • Podcast Definition Continued
    • A podcast can be played on any device that plays digital audio files (your computer, your MP3 player, etc.).
    • A podcast DOES NOT require an ipod.
    • Apple did not originate podcasting and does not own “podcasting.”
  • Podcast Definition Continued
    • Podcasting IS NOT webcasting:
    • It doesn’t stream
    • It isn’t live
    • It is personal (one to one), not a performance (one to many) that might be regulated by the FCC
  • Benefits
    • On-demand content (no click wait); Consumer is “program director”
    • Serialized content
    • Automated, direct distribution
    • Most subscriptions are free
    • Doesn’t require full attention and permits multi-tasking
  • Detractors
    • Distribution uncontrollable
    • Bandwidth consumption high
    • DRM = Digital Rights Management (prohibitive)
  • Brief History of Podcasting
  • Brief History (continued)
  • Why is podcasting important to you?
    • Opportunities for early adopters to gain mind-share in a relatively new space
    • Alternative method for communication and self-promotion
  • WHY?
  • It’s fun.
  • Also…
  • It’s an assignment in CC and you have to do it!
  • How is this assignment useful to you?
    • Learn about university tech resources
    • Improve your presentation skills
    • Improve your interviewing skills
    • Figure out some things about audio
    • Learn a new way to promote yourself, your ideas, and your work
  • OK, let’s go over a few things:
    • What do you record in your podcast?
    • How do you record your podcast?
    • How do you syndicate your podcast?
    • How do you promote your podcast?
  • WHAT DO YOU RECORD IN YOUR PODCAST? (we are going to deal mainly with audio today. You are welcome to make video podcasts if you wish)
  • General Format
    • Intro music/ Introduction
    • Sponsor Recognition
    • Segment 1
    • Segment 2
    • Segment 3
    • Thank you for listening/ feed plug
    • Exit Music
    • *Typical duration ranges from 3 to 45 minutes, but please stick to the lower end of this spectrum
  • Podcast content examples
    • Guest appearances
    • Audience Q&A
    • Media reviews (books, movies, etc.)
    • Music interludes
    • Banter
    • “ Soundseeing” from on location
  • Copyright
    • Most podcasts are talk radio, because record companies haven’t provided an easy, affordable way for podcasters to license songs.
    • Be very careful-- especially with music. You don’t want legal trouble.
  • Copyright Continued
    • Is your music podsafe? When in doubt check with the artist or label before you assume something is podsafe.
    • Podsafe Music Network http://music.podshow.com/
    • Podsafe Audio http://www.podsafeaudio.com/
    • Read more on how to find podsafe music http://www.ipodarmy.com/2005/06/how-to-find-podsafe-music/
  • HOW DO YOU RECORD YOUR PODCAST? (we’ll run through this once, and then get down to details later in the presentation.)
  • Equipment
    • A personal computer, a preamp, and an external drive (flash drive and/or ipod can also be helpful for file transfer/ testing)
    • Audio software
    • Headphones, a mic, and a pop filter
    • An Internet connection
    • Server space & lots of bandwidth
  • Recording Methods
    • Audioblogger http://www.audioblogger.com/ - Phone it in
    • Portable recorder/ DAT
    • Computer recording:
    • Low Quality - PC/ Mac (internal mic)
    • Higher Quality - Mac at school (better mic + preamp)
    • Dual location - Mac (can do on PC; slightly different process/ software)
  • Lower Quality Record
  • Lower Quality Record
    • Audacity - built for PC or Mac http://audacity.sourceforge.net
    • LAME - MP3 Encoder http://audacity.sourceforge.net/help/faq?s=install&item=lame-mp3
    • iTunes http://www.apple.com/itunes/
  • Higher Quality Record
    • Reserve an audio suite on the eighth floor of the KU at least six hours in advance.
    • Check out mics, a DAT, a mini recorder, a pop filter, or other recording equipment from the 9th floor of the KU. Make reservations online two days in advance.
    • See Dave at the DT lab to find out what equipment you can borrow from DT.
  • Higher Quality Record
  • Dual Location Record - Mac
    • What you need:
    • Soundflower + Soundflowerbed http://www.cycling74.com/products/soundflower.html
    • Line-in http://www.rogueamoeba.com/freebies/
    • Skype http://www.skype.com
    • Sound Studio or Garageband
    • http://www.freeverse.com/soundstudio/ http://www.apple.com/ilife/garageband/
  •  
  • Other dual location methods
    • Do it on a PC ($40) http://www.skypejournal.com/blog/archives/2004/12/skype_podcast_r.php
    • Do it with iChat http://www.google.com/search?q=engadget+podcast+ichat&sourceid=mozilla-search&start=0&start=0&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official
  • HOW DO YOU SYNDICATE YOUR PODCAST?
  • Syndication Technology
    • Informal Specifications:
    • RSS 1.0
    • RDF Site Summary
    • Extensible (outdated)
    • RSS 2.0
    • Really Simple Syndication (xml based)
    • Easy to code by hand
    • Formal Specifications: Atom - standardized
  • Which RSS version should you use? Most aggregators can read all three. There are several aggregators linked on the CC Labs site.
  • Okay, but how do I setup the feed?
    • Write the code yourself
    • (generally best)
    • http://audiofeeds.org/tutorial.php
    • Cheat (as long as it works)
    • Feedburner http://www.feedburner.com/fb/a/home
  • Feed dos and don’ts
    • Don’t:
    • Include HTML mark-up in your feed
    • Do:
    • Identify entries (rdf:about, guid, or id)
    • Fill out your ID3 Tags
    • Validate feeds (www.feedvalidator.org)
  • By the way, we’ll get both this Powerpoint presentation and all of these links up on the CC Lab site.
  • How do listeners subscribe?
    • Click on subscription link
    • Highlight it in the address bar
    • Paste it into their aggregator
  • HOW DO YOU PROMOTE YOUR PODCAST?
  • Podcast promotion
    • Link to the feed on your site
    • Register your feed with directories
    • Tell your friends
    • Read 12 ways to promote your podcast
    • http://www.jakeludington.com/project_studio/20051028_12_ways_to_promote_your_podcast.html
  • Podcast Directories
    • Indie Podder http://ipodder.org/
    • Podcast.net http://www.podcast.net/
    • Podcast Alley http://podcastalley.com/
    • (There are many more)
  • WHAT IS THE ASSIGNMENT?
    • 1 Podcast for now (you’ll do 3 over the course of the semester)
    • Duration: 3 minutes
    • Link to syndication feed
    • Upload HTML files to your Parsons site at “~user/podcasts/index.html”
    • There should be some description of what your podcast is about on this page (I.e.-- an HTML [web] presence
  • Judging criteria
    • Assignment completion on time + followed the requirements
    • Everything works (syndication, files, etc.)
    • Sound quality (good volume levels, attractive and interesting voices/ sound/ music)
    • Content quality (creative, structured, on topic)
  • So, now we can move on to the nuts and bolts of creating, editing and distributing a podcast
  • There are two main things we need to cover:
    • Recording a sound file
    • Getting the results into proper file format for subscription and distribution
  • First, recording onto a computer
  • The main thing you have to remember is that computers have different types of audio inputs (the Mac and the PC don’t always work the same way!)
  • So, you can’t always just stick a microphone into the computer and expect it to work. You need to check the “levels” and make sure that your mic setup works.
  • A mic input has a built-in amplification, because the volume of the audio collected by a mic is very low.
  • What this means is that if you plug a mic into a standard “audio in” port on most computers, you will get only a very faint signal– too soft to do much with.
  • By far the easiest way to record to a computer is to use the built-in microphone on a laptop (a powerbook or a PC)
  • The next easiest way to record to a computer is to get a microphone made for the computer. This can plug into either the “audio in” port or USB.
  • A third approach is to record sound using a dedicated box (deck). The 10FL Lab has a couple of nice Marantz flash drive recorders you can check out. The 9/55W13 has Tascam digital audio tape decks you can use.
  •  
  • If you are using a PC, sometimes you can plug a normal microphone right into the audio input (in the front or back, usually pink in color)
  • You need a microphone with a “mini” (1/8”) connector
  • If you are using a Mac workstation, you will need an “iMic” connector (the 10FL lab has a few, check one out)
  • If you want to get really serious, you can use a fancier preamp unit such as a USB M-Box (by M-Audio, 55W13 labs have some of these) or a fire-wire box (M-Audio makes these too, and the 10FL Lab has one)
  • The next few slides are about the fancy set-up. We won’t be messing with this stuff today, but some of you will want to try it out to get better quality results.
  • Mbox front and back USB Mbox front and back-- 55W13 has some of these
  • M-Audio firewire pre-amp (the 10FL lab has one)
  • Fancy fancy recording setup 1. Computer + Audacity + LAME + M-Audio Driver 2. Preamp 3. Power Cord 4. Firewire Cable 5. XLR Cable 6. Mic
  • Steps for the fancy setup:
    • Connect the preamp to a power source using the power cord
    • Connect the mic to the preamp using the XLR cable
    • Connect the preamp to the computer using the firewire cable
  • Preamp Settings
    • Turn it on!
    Depress
  • Preamp Settings
    • Ensure that your mic input is turned on and that the levels are turned up.
    Depress Turn up
  • OK now, whether you are working fancy or simple, once you have a mic set-up you think works, go into System Preferences (Mac), or Control Panel (PC), choose sound, and check that your input settings are correct.
  • If your settings are right, you should see the input level bar go up and down while you speak (on the Mac)
  • Once you have the microphone set up, you need recording software. There are a few choices (check with the 10FL Lab to see what they have set up, or use your own):
    • Peak (Mac)
    • Ableton Live (Mac)
    • Logic (Mac)
    • Garageband (Mac)
    • Audacity (PC and Mac)
  • Of course, some of you may be in a Sound Design class and can do all of this on ProTools. It’s your choice.
  • We will use Audacity for today’s demo. It is free, and works on both Macs and PCs: audacity.sorceforge.net You should install Audacity on your laptop, if you have one.
  • Audacity on the Mac (the PC interface looks very similar)
  • One last software thing we need is the “Lame” libraries, which allows us to export the Audacity files as mp3 files (this may already be installed on the 10FL Lab machines):
  • So, now please go to the computers, get a microphone set up, and try recording a short file You can use your laptop if you have one (you’ll need to install the software)
  • Record
    • Press record and talk into the mic.
    • Access Audacity’s HELP MENU to get fancy.
    • Press stop when finished and export the file as MP3.
    Record Stop
  • Then export the file as an mp3. You can play the file back from Audacity or from iTunes.
  • As far as the sound editing goes, start with Audacity and try putting some clips together. It’s like video editing. It’s easy.
  • Ok, so now you have an mp3 file. That’s not quite a podcast yet. Why not?
  • Two reasons:
    • You are expected to script and edit your content. Remember the slide about typical podcast structure (music, intro, credits, etc.)
    • The final edited mp3 file must be referenced using a protocol that allows users to “subscribe” to your podcast
  • The code protocol we use for podcasting is called: RSS
  • RSS actually stands for three things:
    • Rich Site Summary (RSS 0.91)
    • RDF Site Summary (RSS 0.9 and 1.0)
    • Really Simple Syndication (RSS 2.0.0)
    • (No, this is not a joke)
    • We will use RSS 2.0
  • RSS is a family of XML file formats for Web syndication used by (among other things) news websites and weblogs [The following RSS defs are from Wikipedia]
  • The technology of RSS allows Internet users to subscribe to websites that have provided RSS feeds; these are typically sites that change or add content regularly.
  • The RSS formats provide web content or summaries of web content together with links to the full versions of the content, and other meta-data.
  • RSS is widely used by the weblog community to share the latest entries' headlines or their full text, and even attached multimedia files.
  • A program known as a feed reader or aggregator can check RSS-enabled web pages on behalf of a user and display any updated articles that it finds.
  • On Web pages, RSS feeds are typically linked with an orange rectangle or optionally with the letters or
  • A podcast is an RSS file that contains a link to downloadable audio files instead of a link to a news story.
  • An RSS file is a lot like HTML. There are tags and content. The file can be named just about anything, as long as the tags and content are correct.
  • You are going to make one RSS file for your feed. You can add many mp3 content files to your single feed. You do not need a new RSS file for each mp3!
  • Code
    • (click here for a good step by step tutorial)
    • <?xml version=&quot;1.0&quot; ?>
    • <rss version=&quot;2.0&quot;>
    • <channel>
    • INSERT YOUR CODE HERE
    • <channel>
    • </rss>
  • Your Code
    • <title>Your Site Title</title>
    • <description>Description of your sitedescription>
    • <link>http://yoursite.com</link>
    • <item>
    • <title>Title of Your Podcast 1</title>
    • <description>Description of Your Podcast 1!</description>
    • <link>http://yourpodcast.com/podcast1.mp3</link>
    • </item>
    Repeat for each media (mp3) file
  • Display
    • Save RSS as YourFile.xml
    • Create HTML page to display descriptions of your podcast and a link to the subscription file.
    • Upload your files to your server.
    • Test subscription file in an aggregator such as NetNewsWire
    • http://ranchero.com/netnewswire/
  • Repeat: you must test your final site! Download an aggregator or a feed reader and use it to make sure your RSS file works.
  • Many of you will still have questions. Please work with your friends to figure this out. It is not complex, but it will require you to work through the different steps.
  • Remember that testing is the most important step in the whole process!
    • Test your microphone input
    • Test your sound levels
    • Test your final mp3
    • Test your RSS code
    • Test your final site
    • Try adding another mp3 to your site to see if an aggregator updates as it should
  • The End!