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Chapter 13: Managing Internet and  Network Interoperability
Learning Objectives <ul><li>Install and configure a Web server and a Media Services server </li></ul><ul><li>Install and c...
Learning Objectives (continued) <ul><li>Install and configure a terminal server </li></ul><ul><li>Configure a Telnet serve...
Microsoft Internet  Information Services <ul><li>Internet Information Services (IIS) :  A Microsoft Windows 2000 Server co...
Requirements for Installing  a Web Server  <ul><li>Windows 2000 Server installed </li></ul><ul><li>TCP/IP installed </li><...
Installing IIS <ul><li>IIS is a Windows component that is installed in one of two ways: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From the Con...
IIS Components <ul><li>Several IIS components can be installed, such as Web server, FTP server, NNTP service, and SNMP ser...
Internet Information  Services Components Table 13-1  Internet Information Services Components
Internet Information Services Components (continued)
Internet Information Services Components (continued)
Selecting IIS Components  for Installation  Figure 13-1  Specifying Internet Information Services components
Troubleshooting Tip   <ul><li>After the IIS components are installed in Windows 2000 Server, check all of the services ass...
Configuring IIS   <ul><li>Use the Configure Your Server tool (in the Administrative Tools menu) to further configure IIS s...
Configuring IIS Figure 13-2  Configuring an IIS Web server
Virtual Directory  <ul><li>Virtual directory: A URL formatted address that provides an Internet location (virtual location...
Virtual Directory Security  and Properties Settings <ul><li>When you create a virtual directory on a Web server, be sure t...
Virtual Directory  Security Options Table 13-2  Virtual Directory Security Options
Virtual Directory Properties Tabs Table 13-2  Virtual Directory Security Options
Configuring Virtual  Directory Properties Figure 13-3  A virtual directory’s properties
Managing an IIS Web Server   <ul><li>An IIS Web server is managed using the Internet Services Manager (also called the Int...
Elements Managed through the Internet Services Manager   <ul><li>The Internet Services Manager enables you to manage these...
Using the Internet  Services Manager   Figure 13-4  Managing a Web site
Default Web Site Properties   <ul><li>When a Web site is implemented, configure the Default Web site properties such as se...
Default Web Site Properties Tabs
Default Web Site Properties  Tabs (continued)
Configuring a Web Site Figure 13-5  Configuring Web site properties
Setting Web Site Security <ul><li>In the Web site properties, click the Directory Security tab to configure the following ...
Configuring IP Security Access for Intranets/VPNs <ul><li>You can control access to a Web server by restricting it using a...
Configuring IP  Address Restrictions Figure 13-6  Configuring restricted IP access
Troubleshooting IIS Table 13-5  Troubleshooting IIS
Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
Windows Media Services <ul><li>Install Windows media services to offer voice and video multimedia services on a  Web site,...
Configuring Windows Media Services <ul><li>Use the Windows Media Services Administrator — accessed from the Administrative...
Using the Windows Media  Server Administrator Figure 13-7  Windows Media Server Administrator
Microsoft DNS Server <ul><li>DNS server: A Microsoft service that resolves computer names to IP addresses, such as resolvi...
Design Note <ul><li>When you install Active Directory, you must have at least one DNS server </li></ul><ul><li>A DNS serve...
Installing DNS Server   <ul><li>Install DNS as a Windows component from the Control Panel Add/Remove Programs icon </li></...
Selecting DNS Figure 13-8  Installing Microsoft DNS
Design Tip <ul><li>Assign a static IP address to DNS servers </li></ul><ul><li>On medium and large sized networks, configu...
Configuring DNS <ul><li>Configure a forward and reverse lookup zone in the DNS server: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Forward looku...
Viewing a Forward  Lookup Zone Figure 13-9  DNS Forward lookup zone
Creating a Reverse Lookup Zone Figure 13-10  Creating a reverse lookup zone
Subnets <ul><li>Folders can be created in a reverse lookup zone to reflect subnets </li></ul>
Reverse Lookup Zone  Subnet Folders   Figure 13-11  Reverse lookup zone subfolders for subnets
Forward Lookup Zone Records <ul><li>A forward lookup zone typically contains a host address (A) resource record:  </li></u...
Configuring a Host Address (A) Resource Record Figure 13-12  Creating a host address (A) resource record
Reverse Lookup Zone Records <ul><li>A reverse lookup zone typically contains a pointer (PTR) resource record: </li></ul><u...
Creating a PTR record Figure 13-13  Creating a PTR record
Troubleshooting DNS <ul><li>If DNS is not working, make sure that  the DNS Server and DNS Client services are started and ...
Using Microsoft WINS <ul><li>Install and use Microsoft WINS to resolve NetBIOS computer names </li></ul><ul><li>WINS is in...
DHCP <ul><li>Install Microsoft DHCP to implement dynamic IP addressing on a network </li></ul><ul><li>DHCP is installed as...
Scope <ul><li>Configure one or more scopes after DHCP is installed: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope: A range of IP addresses t...
Specifying a Scope Figure 13-14  Creating a scope
Authorizing a DHCP Server <ul><li>Authorize a DHCP Server in the Active Directory via the DHCP management tool: </li></ul>...
Configure the DHCP Server to Update DNS Records <ul><li>Configure the DHCP server so that it automatically registers new I...
Configuring DNS Updating Figure 13-15  Configuring automatic DNS registration
Troubleshooting a DHCP Server
Troubleshooting a DHCP  Server (continued)
Troubleshooting a DHCP  Server (continued)
Troubleshooting a DHCP  Server (continued)
Terminal Server Defined <ul><li>Terminal server: A server configured to offer terminal services so that clients can run ap...
Reasons for Using  a Terminal Server <ul><li>To support thin clients </li></ul><ul><li>To centralize program access </li><...
Thin Client Defined <ul><li>Thin client: A specialized personal computer or terminal device that has a minimal Windows-bas...
Other Terminal Services Clients <ul><li>Windows 2000 terminal services supports operating systems other than thin clients ...
Design Tip <ul><li>If you plan to have many clients running multiple sessions on a terminal server, use a server computer ...
Terminal Services Components
Installing Terminal Services <ul><li>Terminal Services is a Windows component that is installed using the Control Panel Ad...
Terminal Services Modes <ul><li>When you install terminal services, select either the  Remote administration mode  (to rem...
Selecting the Mode Figure 13-16  Selecting the function of a terminal server
Terminal Services  Management Tools Table 13-8  Terminal Services Management Tools
Terminal Services Components <ul><li>Configure the Terminal Services properties such as permission security, client connec...
Terminal Services Components Table 13-9  Terminal Services Components
Terminal Services  Components (continued)
Configuring Terminal  Services Components Figure 13-17  Terminal service connection properties
Terminal Services Permissions <ul><li>The allow and deny permissions associated with terminal services are: </li></ul><ul>...
Terminal Services  Encryption Options <ul><li>The terminal services encryption options are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low:  Da...
Creating a Terminal Services Client Installation Disk <ul><li>Use the Terminal Services Client Creator tool (from the Admi...
Configuring a Client  Installation Disk Figure 13-18  Creating a terminal services installation disk
Installing Applications for Terminal Services <ul><li>After installing and configuring Terminal Services, use the Control ...
Planning Tip <ul><li>Avoid running 16-bit programs through Terminal Services, because these create extra server overhead —...
Monitoring Terminal Services <ul><li>Use the Terminal Services Manager (on the Administrative Tools menu) to monitor conne...
Troubleshooting a  Terminal Server Table 13-10  Troubleshooting a Terminal Server
Troubleshooting a  Terminal Server (continued)
Troubleshooting a  Terminal Server (continued)
Troubleshooting a  Terminal Server (continued)
Telnet Server <ul><li>Another way for clients to access the resources on a Windows 2000 server is to configure it as a Tel...
Configuring Telnet Server <ul><li>To configure a Telnet server: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the Computer Management or Servi...
Gateway Service for NetWare <ul><li>Gateway Service for NetWare (GSNW): A service included with Windows NT and Windows 200...
Installing and Configuring Gateway Service for NetWare <ul><li>Install the Gateway Service for NetWare using the Network a...
Chapter Summary <ul><li>A Windows 2000 Server can become a Web server by installing IIS </li></ul><ul><li>Install DNS and ...
Chapter Summary <ul><li>Terminal services enable thin clients and other client operating systems to access Windows 2000 Se...
Chapter Summary <ul><li>Use Telnet server for basic TCP/IP client access </li></ul><ul><li>Gateway Services for NetWare en...
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Week 13

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Transcript of "Week 13"

  1. 1. Chapter 13: Managing Internet and Network Interoperability
  2. 2. Learning Objectives <ul><li>Install and configure a Web server and a Media Services server </li></ul><ul><li>Install and configure DNS and WINS servers </li></ul><ul><li>Install and configure a DHCP server </li></ul>
  3. 3. Learning Objectives (continued) <ul><li>Install and configure a terminal server </li></ul><ul><li>Configure a Telnet server </li></ul><ul><li>Install and configure a NetWare gateway </li></ul>
  4. 4. Microsoft Internet Information Services <ul><li>Internet Information Services (IIS) : A Microsoft Windows 2000 Server component that provides Internet Web, FTP, mail, newsgroup, and other services, and that is particularly offered to set up a Web server </li></ul>
  5. 5. Requirements for Installing a Web Server <ul><li>Windows 2000 Server installed </li></ul><ul><li>TCP/IP installed </li></ul><ul><li>Access to an Internet service provider </li></ul><ul><li>Sufficient disk space for IIS-related files </li></ul><ul><li>Disk storage formatted for NTFS (recommended) </li></ul><ul><li>Name resolution software, such as DNS and WINS </li></ul>
  6. 6. Installing IIS <ul><li>IIS is a Windows component that is installed in one of two ways: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From the Control Panel Add/Remove Programs icon </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>From the Administrative Tools menu using the Configure Your Server tool </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. IIS Components <ul><li>Several IIS components can be installed, such as Web server, FTP server, NNTP service, and SNMP service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP): A TCP/IP-based protocol used by NNTP servers to transfer news and informational messages to client subscribers who compose “newsgroups” </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Internet Information Services Components Table 13-1 Internet Information Services Components
  9. 9. Internet Information Services Components (continued)
  10. 10. Internet Information Services Components (continued)
  11. 11. Selecting IIS Components for Installation Figure 13-1 Specifying Internet Information Services components
  12. 12. Troubleshooting Tip <ul><li>After the IIS components are installed in Windows 2000 Server, check all of the services associated with those components to make sure they are started and set to start automatically </li></ul>
  13. 13. Configuring IIS <ul><li>Use the Configure Your Server tool (in the Administrative Tools menu) to further configure IIS services, such as creating a virtual directory </li></ul>
  14. 14. Configuring IIS Figure 13-2 Configuring an IIS Web server
  15. 15. Virtual Directory <ul><li>Virtual directory: A URL formatted address that provides an Internet location (virtual location) for an actual physical folder on a Web server that is used to publish Web documents </li></ul>
  16. 16. Virtual Directory Security and Properties Settings <ul><li>When you create a virtual directory on a Web server, be sure to configure the appropriate security and other properties of the directory </li></ul>
  17. 17. Virtual Directory Security Options Table 13-2 Virtual Directory Security Options
  18. 18. Virtual Directory Properties Tabs Table 13-2 Virtual Directory Security Options
  19. 19. Configuring Virtual Directory Properties Figure 13-3 A virtual directory’s properties
  20. 20. Managing an IIS Web Server <ul><li>An IIS Web server is managed using the Internet Services Manager (also called the Internet Information Services tool) which is started from the Administrative Tools menu or as an MMC snap-in </li></ul>
  21. 21. Elements Managed through the Internet Services Manager <ul><li>The Internet Services Manager enables you to manage these elements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Default Web site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Administration Web site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FTP site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SMTP virtual server </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NNTP virtual server </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Using the Internet Services Manager Figure 13-4 Managing a Web site
  23. 23. Default Web Site Properties <ul><li>When a Web site is implemented, configure the Default Web site properties such as security, the home directory, managers of the Web site, and performance options </li></ul>
  24. 24. Default Web Site Properties Tabs
  25. 25. Default Web Site Properties Tabs (continued)
  26. 26. Configuring a Web Site Figure 13-5 Configuring Web site properties
  27. 27. Setting Web Site Security <ul><li>In the Web site properties, click the Directory Security tab to configure the following authentication options: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Basic authentication (password is sent in clear text): For clients who cannot use an encrypted password </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Digest authentication: For hashed security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrated Windows authentication: For a secret code security determined by a cryptographic formula </li></ul></ul>
  28. 28. Configuring IP Security Access for Intranets/VPNs <ul><li>You can control access to a Web server by restricting it using any combination of the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>IP addresses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>subnets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>domains </li></ul></ul>
  29. 29. Configuring IP Address Restrictions Figure 13-6 Configuring restricted IP access
  30. 30. Troubleshooting IIS Table 13-5 Troubleshooting IIS
  31. 31. Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
  32. 32. Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
  33. 33. Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
  34. 34. Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
  35. 35. Troubleshooting IIS (continued)
  36. 36. Windows Media Services <ul><li>Install Windows media services to offer voice and video multimedia services on a Web site, to enable the streaming mode, and to take advantage of multicasting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Streaming: Playing a multimedia audio, video, or combined file received over a network before the entire file is received at the client </li></ul></ul>
  37. 37. Configuring Windows Media Services <ul><li>Use the Windows Media Services Administrator — accessed from the Administrative Tools menu — to configure Windows Media Services </li></ul>
  38. 38. Using the Windows Media Server Administrator Figure 13-7 Windows Media Server Administrator
  39. 39. Microsoft DNS Server <ul><li>DNS server: A Microsoft service that resolves computer names to IP addresses, such as resolving the computer name Brown to IP address 129.77.1.10, and that resolves IP addresses to computer names </li></ul>
  40. 40. Design Note <ul><li>When you install Active Directory, you must have at least one DNS server </li></ul><ul><li>A DNS server is also needed for an IIS server </li></ul>
  41. 41. Installing DNS Server <ul><li>Install DNS as a Windows component from the Control Panel Add/Remove Programs icon </li></ul><ul><li>Double-click Networking Services in the Windows Components dialog box and select Domain Name System (DNS) </li></ul>
  42. 42. Selecting DNS Figure 13-8 Installing Microsoft DNS
  43. 43. Design Tip <ul><li>Assign a static IP address to DNS servers </li></ul><ul><li>On medium and large sized networks, configure at least two DNS servers on the same or different networks in case one fails </li></ul>
  44. 44. Configuring DNS <ul><li>Configure a forward and reverse lookup zone in the DNS server: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Forward lookup zone: A DNS server zone or table that maps computer names to IP addresses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reverse lookup zone: A DNS server zone or table that maps IP addresses to computer names </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Zones are created and managed by using the DNS tool in the Administrative Tools menu </li></ul>
  45. 45. Viewing a Forward Lookup Zone Figure 13-9 DNS Forward lookup zone
  46. 46. Creating a Reverse Lookup Zone Figure 13-10 Creating a reverse lookup zone
  47. 47. Subnets <ul><li>Folders can be created in a reverse lookup zone to reflect subnets </li></ul>
  48. 48. Reverse Lookup Zone Subnet Folders Figure 13-11 Reverse lookup zone subfolders for subnets
  49. 49. Forward Lookup Zone Records <ul><li>A forward lookup zone typically contains a host address (A) resource record: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Host address (A) resource record: A record in a DNS forward lookup zone that consists of a computer name correlated to an IP version 4 address </li></ul></ul>
  50. 50. Configuring a Host Address (A) Resource Record Figure 13-12 Creating a host address (A) resource record
  51. 51. Reverse Lookup Zone Records <ul><li>A reverse lookup zone typically contains a pointer (PTR) resource record: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pointer (PTR) resource record: A record in a DNS reverse lookup zone that consists of an IP (version 4 or 6) address correlated to a computer name </li></ul></ul>
  52. 52. Creating a PTR record Figure 13-13 Creating a PTR record
  53. 53. Troubleshooting DNS <ul><li>If DNS is not working, make sure that the DNS Server and DNS Client services are started and set to start automatically </li></ul>
  54. 54. Using Microsoft WINS <ul><li>Install and use Microsoft WINS to resolve NetBIOS computer names </li></ul><ul><li>WINS is installed as a Windows component via the Control Panel Add/Remove Programs tool </li></ul><ul><ul><li>WINS is a subcomponent of the Networking Services Windows component </li></ul></ul>
  55. 55. DHCP <ul><li>Install Microsoft DHCP to implement dynamic IP addressing on a network </li></ul><ul><li>DHCP is installed as a Windows component from the Control Panel Add/Remove Programs icon </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Double-click Networking Services in the Windows Components dialog box and select Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) </li></ul></ul>
  56. 56. Scope <ul><li>Configure one or more scopes after DHCP is installed: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope: A range of IP addresses that a DHCP server can assign to clients </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Create scopes and manage DHCP by using the DHCP management tool from the Administrative Tools menu or as an MMC snap-in </li></ul>
  57. 57. Specifying a Scope Figure 13-14 Creating a scope
  58. 58. Authorizing a DHCP Server <ul><li>Authorize a DHCP Server in the Active Directory via the DHCP management tool: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Right-click the server in the tree </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click Authorize </li></ul></ul>
  59. 59. Configure the DHCP Server to Update DNS Records <ul><li>Configure the DHCP server so that it automatically registers new IP address in the DNS server (so you don’t have to) </li></ul><ul><li>To configure the DHCP server: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Open the DHCP management tool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Right-click the DHCP server and click Properties </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the DNS tab </li></ul></ul>
  60. 60. Configuring DNS Updating Figure 13-15 Configuring automatic DNS registration
  61. 61. Troubleshooting a DHCP Server
  62. 62. Troubleshooting a DHCP Server (continued)
  63. 63. Troubleshooting a DHCP Server (continued)
  64. 64. Troubleshooting a DHCP Server (continued)
  65. 65. Terminal Server Defined <ul><li>Terminal server: A server configured to offer terminal services so that clients can run applications on the server, similar to having clients respond as terminals </li></ul>
  66. 66. Reasons for Using a Terminal Server <ul><li>To support thin clients </li></ul><ul><li>To centralize program access </li></ul><ul><li>To remotely administer Windows 2000 Server </li></ul>
  67. 67. Thin Client Defined <ul><li>Thin client: A specialized personal computer or terminal device that has a minimal Windows-based operating system. A thin client is designed to connect to a host computer that does most or all of the processing. The thin client is mainly responsible for providing a graphical user interface and network connectivity. </li></ul>
  68. 68. Other Terminal Services Clients <ul><li>Windows 2000 terminal services supports operating systems other than thin clients such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MS-DOS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows 3.x </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows 95/98 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows NT and Windows 2000 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>UNIX and X-terminals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Macintosh </li></ul></ul>
  69. 69. Design Tip <ul><li>If you plan to have many clients running multiple sessions on a terminal server, use a server computer that has a fast CPU and ample RAM </li></ul>
  70. 70. Terminal Services Components
  71. 71. Installing Terminal Services <ul><li>Terminal Services is a Windows component that is installed using the Control Panel Add/Remove Programs tool </li></ul><ul><li>Install both the Terminal Services and Terminal Services Licensing components </li></ul>
  72. 72. Terminal Services Modes <ul><li>When you install terminal services, select either the Remote administration mode (to remotely administer a server) or the Application server mode (for clients to run software on the server) </li></ul>
  73. 73. Selecting the Mode Figure 13-16 Selecting the function of a terminal server
  74. 74. Terminal Services Management Tools Table 13-8 Terminal Services Management Tools
  75. 75. Terminal Services Components <ul><li>Configure the Terminal Services properties such as permission security, client connection settings, session timeout settings, and others </li></ul>
  76. 76. Terminal Services Components Table 13-9 Terminal Services Components
  77. 77. Terminal Services Components (continued)
  78. 78. Configuring Terminal Services Components Figure 13-17 Terminal service connection properties
  79. 79. Terminal Services Permissions <ul><li>The allow and deny permissions associated with terminal services are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Full Control: For access that includes query, set information, reset server, remote control, logon, logoff, message, connect, disconnect, and virtual channel use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User Access: Enables access to query, connect, and send messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guest Access: Enables access to logon </li></ul></ul>
  80. 80. Terminal Services Encryption Options <ul><li>The terminal services encryption options are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low: Data sent from the client to the server is encrypted </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Medium: Data sent from the client to the server and from the server to the client is encrypted using the default server encryption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>High: Data sent from the client to the server and from the server to the client is encrypted using the highest encryption level at the server </li></ul></ul>
  81. 81. Creating a Terminal Services Client Installation Disk <ul><li>Use the Terminal Services Client Creator tool (from the Administrative Tools menu) to create a client installation disk </li></ul>
  82. 82. Configuring a Client Installation Disk Figure 13-18 Creating a terminal services installation disk
  83. 83. Installing Applications for Terminal Services <ul><li>After installing and configuring Terminal Services, use the Control Panel Add/Remove Programs tool to install software applications that clients will access (and reinstall applications that were installed before Terminal Services) </li></ul>
  84. 84. Planning Tip <ul><li>Avoid running 16-bit programs through Terminal Services, because these create extra server overhead — reducing the number of connections by 60 percent and increasing demands on RAM by 50 percent </li></ul>
  85. 85. Monitoring Terminal Services <ul><li>Use the Terminal Services Manager (on the Administrative Tools menu) to monitor connection sessions, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Viewing a session’s status </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Connecting to view a session </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Logging off a user or resetting a session </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sending a message </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ending a process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Controlling a session remotely </li></ul></ul>
  86. 86. Troubleshooting a Terminal Server Table 13-10 Troubleshooting a Terminal Server
  87. 87. Troubleshooting a Terminal Server (continued)
  88. 88. Troubleshooting a Terminal Server (continued)
  89. 89. Troubleshooting a Terminal Server (continued)
  90. 90. Telnet Server <ul><li>Another way for clients to access the resources on a Windows 2000 server is to configure it as a Telnet server </li></ul><ul><li>Telnet is TCP/IP-based and enables a computer to be set up as a network host to clients </li></ul>
  91. 91. Configuring Telnet Server <ul><li>To configure a Telnet server: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the Computer Management or Services tool to start the Telnet Server service </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An alternative method is to open the Command Prompt window and enter net start tlntsvr </li></ul></ul>
  92. 92. Gateway Service for NetWare <ul><li>Gateway Service for NetWare (GSNW): A service included with Windows NT and Windows 2000 Server that provides connectivity to NetWare resources for Windows NT and Windows 2000 servers and their clients with the Windows NT/2000 server acting as a gateway </li></ul>
  93. 93. Installing and Configuring Gateway Service for NetWare <ul><li>Install the Gateway Service for NetWare using the Network and Dial-up Connections tool </li></ul><ul><li>Use the GSNW icon on the Control Panel to configure Gateway Service for NetWare </li></ul><ul><li>Use the Add Printers tool to connect to NetWare print queues through the gateway </li></ul>
  94. 94. Chapter Summary <ul><li>A Windows 2000 Server can become a Web server by installing IIS </li></ul><ul><li>Install DNS and WINS to resolve computer names and IP addresses </li></ul><ul><li>Install DHCP to enable a Windows 2000 server to automatically assign IP addresses to clients </li></ul>
  95. 95. Chapter Summary <ul><li>Terminal services enable thin clients and other client operating systems to access Windows 2000 Server and run applications on the server </li></ul><ul><li>Terminal services are also used to enable an administrator to remotely manage a server </li></ul>
  96. 96. Chapter Summary <ul><li>Use Telnet server for basic TCP/IP client access </li></ul><ul><li>Gateway Services for NetWare enables Windows 2000 Server clients to access NetWare servers </li></ul>
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