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  • This presentation can be used in traditional linear fashion or be run as an interactive slide show. By clicking on either the icons above or the Contents Headings, you can navigate to those specific segments of the presentation. Many of the slides have text boxes, arrows, or pointers that are timed to display automatically. Note that there is an icon with the word “Menu” at the bottom of each slide in the main portion of the presentation. When you click on this icon, you will be returned to this menu slide.
  • One main point to emphasize on this slide is the fact that the same Passcode is used by all users in a specified school building. Also, emphasize that new users should only enter the Passcode on this log-in page—a common mistake that many new users make is to enter their Passcode and type in a preferred username and password. A second important point to emphasize is the fact that different types of Passcodes are used to create teacher and student accounts at school. The main difference between the two is that when students log-in at school with student accounts, they will not see the Teacher’s Guides and Blackline Masters. Once users have created accounts, they will not need to use the Passcode again. Each time they return to the site, they use the username and password they stipulated when they created their accounts.
  • The purpose of this slide is to illustrate the unitedstreaming account set-up screen. Four main points to emphasize when discussing the process of setting up accounts include: The “username” field is the most critical since the desired username for each new account must be unique to the entire unitedstreaming user database. If a new user is having trouble defining a unique username, he/she may want to try appending the desired username with a number or some other designation that may unique to the user’s school or district. It is not mandatory to enter information in all fields—only those with an asterisk are required fields. The click box in front of the phrase “I have read and agree to the Terms of Use” must be selected before a new account can be created. Clicking on the “Terms of Use” hyperlink will display a page with all terms and requirements. It is a good idea to recommend to new users that they select the option to receive the monthly newsletter. It is an e-mail update that includes information about new video titles, updated web site features, technology grants and conferences, and implementation strategies.
  • The main point to emphasize while working with this slide is the fact that the five search tools work differently—the “User Tip” that displays after a few seconds helps to remind users to become familiar with the way each tool can be used to search the website for resources. Note: This is one of several points in the presentation that it would be effective to open up the live unitedstreaming web site and demonstrate the look and functionality of the search tools. By keeping both this PowerPoint window and the browser window open throughout the presentation, it will be easy to switch between views by using the application icons on the Taskbar (Windows) or the Dock (Macintosh).
  • This enhanced Search Results screen is one of the powerful new features of unitedstreaming Version 2 since it allows users to quickly access video resources and digital images from one screen. Some points to emphasize: The default view will continue to be “Full Videos” since it remains the most popular and efficient way to explore the video collection. The three-tab view illustrated here only displays when a user conducts a keyword search; search results completed with the other tools will be displayed in list form with only a single “videos” tab. When users click on the “clips” tab, they will see a list of every clip in the collection that contains the keyword(s) used in the search process. This will be especially helpful when the same concept is covered by several clips from a variety of video titles since users can more easily compare similar clips and choose on the basis of clip length or copyright preferences.
  • Teachers will probably find many creative ways to use the Playlist feature as they plan and deliver lessons. Here are some of the most popular uses: Clip Organizer- As teachers do research for teaching units or to address state curriculum standards, they may find that the collection contains several clips from a variety of full video titles that provide similar coverage of specific concepts or topics. Once they have previewed the clips to determine which are most suitable, they can add those titles to their personal Playlist to help them to identify those preferred clips at a later date. Lesson Plan Menu- In school settings where bandwidth availability makes streaming a viable option during the school day, teachers may find that the Playlist is a convenient way to organize video clips from a variety of video titles and then display them like a menu to facilitate easy access to the clips during classroom presentations. Home Research- Teachers who work from a dial-up Internet account at home will likely find that downloading video clips can be a time consuming process. In those cases, they may consider using the search tools at home to locate video clips, but instead of trying to download them, simply add the clips to their Playlists. When they log in at school the next day, they can display their Playlists and quickly download all desired clips without having to replicate the search steps.
  • A key concept related to the use of the Image Library is the fact that all unitedstreaming subscribers can confidently use all of the images and know that they are in compliance with copyright and fair use guidelines. This differentiates the Image Library from the many photo sites on the Internet in which the copyright status of the images is not clearly delineated. Most of the image files are photographs, though there are some categories that are completely or largely composed of diagrams or drawings: Alphabet- large and colorful images devoted to each letter of the alphabet that would work very nicely as slides in PowerPoint, AppleWorks, or Keynote projects and presentations. Teachers could also incorporate video clips from the collection that correspond to each letter. Human Body- this category combines many large and colorful illustrations of body systems along with color photographs. Labels- this is a broad category containing many textbook-type illustrations with labels covering a wide range of topics such as weather, water cycles, and cells.
  • One of the nice features of the Image Library is the fact that each image is available in the three sizes and resolutions noted in the slide. To view and/or download an image, start by clicking on the link in the image viewer that corresponds to the desired resolution. The image will now be displayed at the appropriate size in a new window. At this point, PC users will right-click on the picture and select “Save Picture As…” from the menu. Mac users will typically use the Control-click procedure and choose “Download Image to Disk.” Note: The High Resolution images are often too large to view full size in the browser window. When that happens, you will see a zoom tool displayed in the lower right corner. Click this zoom icon to view the image at full size.
  • The Clip Art Gallery has very similar functionality to the Image Library. See the notes for slides 12 and 13 for details.
  • .
  • The Writing Prompts feature currently contains 50 images paired with questions and suggested topics that can be used for descriptive, narrative, and expository writing activities. In addition, many other pictures in the Image Library might be used as prompts for writing as well, and teachers may want to use the ideas in this collection to help them to formulate additional writing assignments. When the user clicks the “Writing Prompt” link in the image viewer, a new page is displayed that contains both the picture and the related questions. This page may be printed and handed out to students. Note: At present, the questions and topics suggested in Writing Prompts feature are geared toward elementary school students, specifically grades 3-5.
  • The function of the Calendar feature is largely unchanged from its predecessor in the previous version of unitedstreaming . The look of the calendar viewer has been updated. Note : The “previous” and “next” links at the top of the Calendar allow users to navigate to the pages for other months and search for clips related to specific commemorative holidays and historical events. Look for special lists with clips relating to: Black History Month (February) Hispanic Heritage Month (September/October)
  • .
  • The Quiz Center is a powerful tool, and there are several steps involved in the creation and posting of an online quiz. Teachers who are interested in using this feature should click on the “Help” link in the Navigation Bar, choose the “User Guide” option from the menu in the left frame, and then click the “Quiz Center” link to reveal the contents of this segment of the guide. There are step-by-step instructions covering every aspect of the process.
  • . A main point to emphasize with the Teacher Feature is the fact that a new topic will be created each week and that each featured unit of study contains discussion guides, lesson plans tailored for various grade levels, student activities, and links to video clips that are relevant to the lesson. Because of this, this feature can be a useful way for teachers to learn how to create integrated lessons and student activities. Note also that there are links to “View Archived Teacher Features.” This is an important tool since it allows teachers to browse all available units very easily and access units when they are ready to use them with their students.
  • . One of the newest sections of the unitedstreaming web site is the Teacher Center, a place where teachers can access training materials, sample lesson plans, instructional documents, and information about web-based tutorials. The Interactive Training modules are asynchronous lessons designed for independent study. Each module is comprised of a 30 minute online lesson coupled with an optional two-hour independent project. Users can print a Certificate of Completion after successfully completing each lesson, and they may be able to earn in-service or continuing education credits for the work that they have completed. Webinars are scheduled all through the year and users can register to participate in web-based tutorials on topics such as unitedstreaming fundamentals and integration of digital resources into lessons and projects. The FAQ files were created in partnership with Atomic Learning and are designed to help users with quick questions about some of the features on the site. They provide the “just-in-time” instruction that users may need as they complete projects. The sample lessons in the Teacher Center were taken from the Discovery School website and may help teachers to see the possibilities of transforming existing lesson documents into dynamic integrated activities with embedded video clips or hyperlinks to downloaded clips.
  • The main purpose of this slide is to outline the three most common uses for downloaded video clips and to illustrate the look and functionality of hyperlinks and embedded files in a presentation. In the section titled “Hyperlinking,” the underlined word “hyperlinks” is a functioning link to a downloaded clip. Just click to open the media player and play the video to demonstrate this method. The media element positioned below the paragraph titled “Embedded Video” is the same clip used in the hyperlinking example above. It is set to manual play, and so to start the video, position the cursor directly over this embedded element and click. Both methods are effective ways to integrate the video content into new or existing lessons and presentations. Teachers should choose the method that best meets specific project goals or classroom presentation capabilities.
  • This slide is designed to illustrate some of the many software applications that are compatible with unitedstreaming and help to provide an anchor to the second segment of the presentation—”Implementation Strategies.” A series of logos representing popular software applications are timed to appear. Some applications that support the embedding technique described on the previous slide include Microsoft Office, AppleWorks, and Keynote. Any application that allows users to define hyperlinks to other files can be used to create interactive presentations and projects. Among the most common are: Microsoft Office - Hyperstudio - Inspiration (version 7.0 or later) - Ezedia - TimeLiner
  • Points to emphasize with Lesson #1: Most teachers have used word processing applications like Microsoft Word for years to create worksheets, handouts, unit guide sheets, tests, and other materials. Encourage them to redesign existing documents to incorporate hyperlinks to video clips. This is a lesson example suitable for high school students, but the model can be applied to all grade levels and all subject areas. This example includes activities related to the use of digital images and links to web pages related to the subject. In that sense, this activity resembles a WebQuest in design, though the user does not need to know how to use HTML editors or web publishing skills. Instead, the files must simply be available to users in digital form in classrooms, computer labs, or media centers.
  • Points to emphasize with Lesson #2 and #3: Lesson #2 is a two slide PowerPoint file that is more a demonstration than a true lesson plan or project. It was designed to illustrate the use of unitedstreaming clips with an Inspiration concept map. The concept map on slide 1 was created in Inspiration and exported to PowerPoint as a JPG image. Invisible rectangular shapes (no line, no fill) have been drawn over the Inspiration shapes that contain the names of the countries and cultures and serve as hyperlinks to corresponding video clips. Position your cursor over any of the “hot spots” and click to open and view the clips. Inspiration projects like the one shown on slide 1 could be used as self-paced individual or group activities; they would also work well in a cooperative learning environment as jigsaw activities. The illustration in Lesson #3 is taken from the Image Library and “hot spots” as described above were added to all of the labels to show how a portion of any photograph might be used as a hyperlink to a video clip, a slide containing an embedded video, or additional instructional slides. Again, this short “lesson” is really a demonstration of how a photograph or diagram might be used as a menu. Action Settings have been used to create navigational hyperlinks to slides 2-5 and a return link on each of those slides takes the user back to the original image.
  • Points to emphasize with Lesson #4: This is one of several sample lessons available for download on the unitedstreaming site and is shown to illustrate the ways that embedded clips and navigation links can be used to create an interactive student-based project. As you proceed through the first slides, you will see the directions, focus questions, and lists of vocabulary terms that the teacher has prepared for her students. When you reach the video menu slide, you can click on any of the text or image links to advance to slides that contain embedded video clips. Note that at the bottom of each of these video slides, there is a navigation link to take the user back to the menu slide. This is a useful feature and easy to create with PowerPoint Action Settings. This lesson is specifically about biomes and ecosystems and was created for a 3 rd grade audience, but the model used by this teacher could be used to create similar presentations and learning tools for any grade level or subject area.
  • Points to emphasize with Lesson #5: This is a lesson created for junior high or middle school students. The teacher made extensive use of the Microsoft drawing tools to illustrate the Pythagorean Theorem and then incorporated two video clips to guide students in real life applications of the theorem. This lesson uses two types of clips that are common in many of the mathematics video titles—one clip is used to present a series of problems for students to solve and the second clip provides the answers with explanations as to how the problems were solved. This lesson is a good example to show how projects can easily be designed so that they can be used on both Macintosh and Windows/PC computers. In this case, the teacher simply downloaded both the QuickTime (.mov) and the Windows Media Player (.asf) versions of the clips and then created parallel hyperlinks so that users can select the file format that is best in a particular classroom or computer lab.
  • Points to emphasize with Lesson #6: This lesson file actually contains 8 short lessons in one document. They are all examples of “lesson starters” that have been written for a variety of grade levels and teaching areas. Trainers might consider having teachers create “lesson starter” activities of their own to practice searching, downloading, and hyperlinking procedures. Even though these types of activities are short, they contain all of the elements of longer and more comprehensive interactive video lessons.
  • The main point of this slide is to remind users that video projects can be used wherever teachers and students are working on computers in the school. Some teachers may feel that the only way the clips can be used is in a classroom equipped with an LCD projector so that the whole class can watch at once. That scenario may be ideal for some activities, but other projects can be just as effective, and sometimes even more effective, when students are allowed to work at their own pace at student “centers” or in computer labs.
  • .
  • This slide covers most of the main issues that are commonly raised when copyright and fair use guidelines are discussed. Some points to raise: Remember that you can use the “Advanced Search” took and click on the Editable Titles box to locate those video clips that may be used in video editing software applications such as iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, or MovieMaker. Emphasize that files and projects can be used as long as a unitedstreaming subscription is current; such projects and files would need to be taken off school servers and out of circulation if and when a subscription expires. There is a two-page section (pp 23-24) in the Training Manual specifically devoted to the procedures that teachers need to follow if they plan to use video clips on curriculum web pages. Users can view the complete “Terms of Use” document by clicking on the link at the bottom of the home search page and on several other pages throughout the web site.
  • Users can refer to p.14 in the Training Manual or use the online “Help” section on the web site to see a more complete explanation of the formats used to cite videos and images taken from the unitedstreaming site.
  • Users can refer to pp. 20-21 in the Training Manual for additional information relating to these Tech Tips. Issues that are commonly raised: For file storage, emphasize the fact that any digital storage device can be used to store or archive files and project folders—slide 34 has a complete list of media that can be used. Once save to such portable media, the files can be deleted from hard drives and server volumes to conserve space. There are links in the online “Help” section on the web site to help users locate and download new versions of the media players, Acrobat Reader, and codecs if necessary.
  • This slide may be used to generate a discussion regarding the three delivery options and the relative strengths and requirements of each option. The presenter may want to go live to an account that uses the Network Manager in order to demonstrate the “Download Later” functionality that it provides users. The presenter could also provide updated statistics regarding the size of the current library—about 500 GB at present.
  • The emphasis here is that storage devices and media need to be digital since Discovery Education/unitedstreaming holds the digital rights to the video titles on the site. “ Global shared folders” refers to school network configurations in which teachers and students can see shared server volumes and folders when they log into the system. When such shared folders are available, teachers can easily move files and projects to these locations so that their students can access them in the classrooms and computer labs.
  • Users can refer to pp. 20-21 in the Training Manual for additional information relating to these Tech Tips. Issues that are commonly raised: For file storage, emphasize the fact that any digital storage device can be used to store or archive files and project folders—slide 34 has a complete list of media that can be used. Once save to such portable media, the files can be deleted from hard drives and server volumes to conserve space. There are links in the online “Help” section on the web site to help users locate and download new versions of the media players, Acrobat Reader, and codecs if necessary. “ Make duplicate project folders” is a reminder that more than one user can open and use a specific video clip file or project folder at the same time. When teachers expect large numbers of students to attach to specific files, they might consider making multiple folders on the server that contain the files and lessons and then direct students to those assigned folders (Row 1, Row 2… or Pod 1, Pod 2…) to help avoid slowdowns.
  • . One of the newest sections of the unitedstreaming web site is the Teacher Center, a place where teachers can access training materials, sample lesson plans, instructional documents, and information about web-based tutorials. The Interactive Training modules are asynchronous lessons designed for independent study. Each module is comprised of a 30 minute online lesson coupled with an optional two-hour independent project. Users can print a Certificate of Completion after successfully completing each lesson, and they may be able to earn in-service or continuing education credits for the work that they have completed. Webinars are scheduled all through the year and users can register to participate in web-based tutorials on topics such as unitedstreaming fundamentals and integration of digital resources into lessons and projects. The FAQ files were created in partnership with Atomic Learning and are designed to help users with quick questions about some of the features on the site. They provide the “just-in-time” instruction that users may need as they complete projects. The sample lessons in the Teacher Center were taken from the Discovery School website and may help teachers to see the possibilities of transforming existing lesson documents into dynamic integrated activities with embedded video clips or hyperlinks to downloaded clips.
  • Transcript

    • 1. A Guide to unitedstreaming Digital Resources Strategies for Training and Implementation
    • 2. Implementation Strategies Overview and Key Features Overview & New Features Passcodes, Search Features, Learning Tools, and Hyperlinking Technical Issues Tech Tips, Access Options, Storage Devices, and Cross-platform Issues Software Applications, Sample Lessons and Copyright Issues
    • 3. A1B2 C3D4 New users in each school building will need to know the unique 8-character Passcode that has been assigned to their school. When they enter the Passcode and click the “Sign Up” button, they will be taken to an account set-up screen . Note: Teacher Passcodes should be used for faculty accounts. Separate student Passcodes are used to generate accounts for student users in each school . User Passcodes
    • 4. User Passcodes Central High School
    • 5. You can use any of five different types of search tools to locate video clips, pictures from the Image Library, and supplemental resources and tutorials that are also posted on the website. User Tip: Because the unitedstreaming resources are varied and diverse, you should learn how to use all of the search tools in order to make the most effective use of the website. Search Tools
    • 6. When you conduct a search, you will see a display of the search results like the one shown here. Titles will be listed alphabetically and sorted by topic. If the list of results is too long, you may want to refine your search terms or use another tool. New Feature: Search results now display full video titles, individual clips, and pictures from the Image Library. Click on the tabs to look at the resources that you need for your projects. Search Results
    • 7. The Playlist feature is a powerful tool that allows you to maintain organized lists of clip titles that you can easily access when you are ready to stream or download videos. To add a clip to your own Playlist, just click on the “a” button in front of the appropriate clip title. When the Playlist window displays, you can choose to add the clip to your general list or create custom folders to match your units and projects. Playlist
    • 8. The Image Library contains photographs, illustrations, and other digital images that can be used in multimedia projects and presentations. You can search the collection using keywords or you can browse the collection by category. When you see an image that meets your needs, click on the thumbnail to see the picture displayed in a special viewer. Image Library
    • 9. Once the image is displayed in the viewer, you now have the option of downloading the image file in one of three resolutions. -- Small: thumbnail sized images suitable for interactive buttons and hyperlinks -- Medium: Medium sized images designed to be used in screen presentations and web pages -- Large: High quality pictures that can be enlarged to reveal fine details Image Library
    • 10. The Clip Art Gallery is one of the newer features on the unitedstreaming website and is designed to supplement the Image Library. You can use the clip art images to illustrate your documents and slide shows. You can also associate hyperlinks to any image to launch a video clip. When you see a clip art image that you want to insert in a project, click on the thumbnail to see the picture displayed in a special viewer.. Clip Art Gallery
    • 11. Once the clip art image is displayed in the viewer, you now have the option of downloading the image file in one of three resolutions. -- Small: thumbnail images suitable for interactive buttons and hyperlinks -- Medium: Medium sized images designed to be used to illustrate screen presentations and web pages -- Large: High quality pictures that can be used for full screen displays Clip Art Gallery
    • 12. The Writing Prompts section includes a collection of interesting photographs that have been selected to serve as the basis for a variety of writing assignments. When you click on the “Writing Prompt” button, you will see a larger version of the picture along with suggested focus questions. User’s Tip: Start with this collection and then explore the entire Image Library for additional pictures for your composition assignments. Writing Prompts
    • 13. The interactive calendar is a great way to locate and show video clips that relate to important events that occurred on specific dates in history such as political movements, scientific discoveries, and cultural achievements. To view a list of clips that pertain to the events of a specified date, just click on the appropriate day on the calendar interface. Note: You can also navigate to other months by clicking the “Previous” or “Next” links at the top of the calendar. Calendar
    • 14. From the list titled “Today in History,” you can select individual video clips to preview or show to your students. The length of each clip is indicated following each title. When you click on a link to a video clip, you will see an interface with buttons for streaming and downloading the file. Many teachers view the calendar as an additional search tool that helps them to locate resources that they may have missed with the standard search tools. Calendar
    • 15. Use the Quiz Center to create online quizzes and tests that are linked to selected video clips from the collection. You can start with a new file or modify any of the existing files in the quiz library to meet your needs. When you add you own instructions, references to the state standards addressed in the quiz, and links to selected clips, you can create an activity that you students can complete independently, even if they do not have unitedstreaming accounts. Quiz Center
    • 16. Be sure to check the Learning Resources section of the website regularly for special “Teacher Feature” materials. These teaching modules include lesson plans, student handouts, and links to unitedstreaming videos that pertain to a specific unit of study or special event. Teacher Feature
    • 17. The Teacher Center is a central location on the website for users who are interested in online training opportunities, web-based instruction, lesson plans, and instructional documents. Users who complete the Interactive Training modules may qualify for in-service or re-certification credits in their school districts. Click on each icon for additional information. Teacher Center
    • 18. There are three common ways that you can use downloaded video clips: Standalone files: Just double-click on the file icons to open the preferred media player to play the clips. Hyperlinks: Create hyperlinks in most standard applications to link words and pictures to video resources that you wish to add to your lessons. Embedded Video: Insert video clips directly into documents and slides and view the clips without using a media player. Hyperlinking In software applications like Word, PowerPoint, Inspiration, and many others, users can click on defined hyperlinks to view video clips with a specified media player. Embedded Video PowerPoint, AppleWorks, and Keynote are among the software products that allow you to embed video files right onto the pages and slides that you have created: Downloaded Clips
    • 19. Software Applications You can use hyperlinking or embedding techniques to integrate unitedstreaming clips into projects made with many software applications
    • 20. Adding hyperlinks to new or existing word processing documents is an effective and easy way to create lessons and projects that are centered around video clips. Lesson Sample #1: Stephen Crane and The Red Badge of Courage : Supplemental Activities and Enrichment Projects Sample Lesson 1
    • 21. Hyperlinks can also be added to Inspiration projects or attached to text objects, images, or AutoShapes in Word or PowerPoint files. Lesson Samples #2 and #3: World Architecture Elements of a Cell Sample Lesson 2
    • 22. Video clips can be embedded directly into presentation slides in applications such as PowerPoint, AppleWorks, and Keynote Lesson Sample #4: Ecosystems: A unitedstreaming Lesson Demonstration Sample Lesson 3
    • 23. Because unitedstreaming video clips are available in formats supported by the Windows Media Player and the QuickTime players, lessons and projects can be created for use on both PC and Macintosh computers. Lesson Sample #5: The Pythagorean Theorem:Real Life Applications Sample Lesson 4
    • 24. One of the most common and effective ways that teachers use unitedstreaming video resources is to select individual clips and show them to students at the start of a school day or a class period. These “lesson starters” can serve as an anticipatory set, a focus for discussion, or even a prompt for writing. Lesson Sample #6: Lesson Starters Sample Lesson 5
    • 25.
      • Classroom presentations with LCD projectors
      • Televisions with scan converters
      • Computer labs
      • Mobile carts with laptop computers
      • Student “stations” and “centers”
      • Libraries and Media Centers
      • Interactive whiteboards
      Implementation Models
    • 26. Create lessons and projects in which students are always actively involved in the viewing process and follow-up activities. During student presentations, mute the sound and have students write their own narrations for video clips. Play clips with sound but without video display; encourage students to listen for details and unique sounds before they write. Even with short clips, stop to discuss specific frames in the video or use the still images for writing prompts. Be sure to pose questions or prepare thought-provoking “lesson starters” before viewing to actively engage students. Try creating individualized projects that students can access on “learning centers” in the classroom or computer labs. Some Teaching Strategies to Consider Teaching Strategies
    • 27. No video editing software is permitted except for those titles that have been designated as “Editable Content.” Students are allowed to keep projects containing video clips in their electronic portfolios if used for demonstration purposes. Teachers may keep video files and projects on disks and servers as long as subscription is current. Protect the content, especially when creating web pages, so that only subscribers are able to see the video files. Converting digital video to analog format such as VHS cassettes is not allowed—only digital devices may be used. Be sure to use proper APA or MLA formats when you cite video resources and support materials. Protecting unitedstreaming Content Copyright Issues
    • 28. Use the following approved formats when you cite the video clips and digital images from the unitedstreaming libraries: Videos MLA Example: All About the Enlightenment: The Age of Reason. United Learning, 2004. Discovery Education. 02 Jan. 2005 http://www.unitedstreaming.com United Learning (Publisher). (2004). All About the Enlightenment: The Age of Reason [Motion Picture, streaming video]. Retrieved January 2, 2005, from Discovery Education: http://www.unitedstreaming.com Images MLA Example: Name of the Image. By Paul Fuqua. 2003. Discovery Education. 02 Jan. 2005 http://www.unitedstreaming.com APA Example: Fuqua, Paul (2003). Name of the image [Image]. Retrieved January 2, 2005, from Discovery Education: http://www.unitedstreaming.com APA Example: Citing Resources
    • 29. Each minute of downloaded video will require about 1.8 Mb of storage space on hard drives or other storage media. A building with a dedicated T-1 line could accommodate 6 users streaming video with no buffering assuming no other users. Home users with 56k modems can easily search and use support materials; downloads are possible but will be slow. Windows Media Player (version 9) and Apple QuickTime Player (version 6) are recommended for best results. Minimum screen resolution should be set at 800 x 600; you will get better results if you set screen resolution at 1024 x 768. You may need to install updated “codecs” if the media player is not properly playing the audio or video components. Technology Information to Know Tech Tips
    • 30.
      • Internet Access– the standard option in which all streamed and downloaded files come from unitedstreaming servers to user’s computers on demand.
      • Network Manager– the user interface is modified and a “download later” function is added to allow users to schedule downloads at off-peak hours, a valuable option for users who have concerns about bandwidth during school hours.
      • Local Hosting– the entire video library is housed locally on a dedicated video server to provide very rapid and efficient streaming and file saving capabilities.
      Access Options
    • 31.
      • Digital media such as CDs, DVDs, Zip disks, USB flash drives, iPods, and even digital camera media cards
      • Workstation hard drives
      • Global shared folders and volumes on network servers
      • Multimedia Stations and classroom learning “centers”
      • Dedicated video file servers
      File Storage The following are some of the common options for saving and transferring video clips and digital images:
    • 32. Help to eliminate duplicate downloads by creating shared folders on the file servers for grade levels or subject areas. Provide an external CD burner or USB flash drives on a check-out basis for teachers who do not have tools for transferring files. Use the administrative tools to restrict streaming and downloading hours if bandwidth limitations are a concern. Limit file names to 8 characters or fewer and use file extensions to insure that projects will work on Macintosh and PC platforms. Make duplicate project folders when students work in computer labs to accommodate multiple “hits” on the same files. Consider using the Network Manager or Local Host options when serving large numbers of users on a shared network. Downloading and File Storage Strategies Tech Tips
    • 33. Interactive Training Lesson 1: Features & Navigation Access resources correlated to your curriculum, subject area, and grade level. Lesson 2: Integration Strategies Use digital media to create multimedia lesson plans. Lesson 3: Differentiated Instruction Explore how unitedstreaming content can be used to meet diverse needs of students. Lesson 4: Teacher Training & Technical Considerations Examine strategies, support materials, and technical considerations for training others. BACK

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