Outline of this Presentation 1, Introduction to our FYP
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  • Provide Wireless Technology and Architectural Evaluation This objective calls for investigation on the cutting edge technologies in wireless and thin-client equipment,and the forecast of what would be available in the near future for the best performance and price consideration. Develop Software and System Infrastructure We plan to design an overall wireless campus architecture, including the acquisition of wireless and thin-client devices, the number of required components, and their hierarchical distribution and appropriate layout structure. We will also develop software infrastructure for teaching and learning in wireless networks. This infrastructure includes software components for (i) lecture presentation and student/teacher communication, (ii) graphical user interface design, (iii) multimedia applications for information searching and contents retrieval. Create Wireless Quality Education Service and Content This objective focuses on the development of courseware for wireless setting. The developed courseware will emphasise high interaction and user-friendly multimedia contents. It will also develop wireless-based testing mechanism. Students can perform test in the wireless environment, and testing questions can be dynamically adjusted according to students' learning progress and capabilities.
  • Data and Voice access points Bluetooth facilitates real-time voice and data transmissions. The technology makes it possible to connect any portable and stationary communication device as easily as switching on the lights. You can, for instance, surf the Internet and send e-mails on your portable PC or notebook regardless of whether you are wirelessly connected through a mobile phone or through a wire-bound connection (PSTN, ISDN, LAN, xDSL). . Cable replacement Bluetooth eliminates the need for numerous, often proprietary, cable attachments for connection of practically any kind of communication device. Connections are instant and they are maintained even when devices are not within line of sight. The range of each radio is approximately 10 meters, but it can be extended to around 100 meters with an optional amplifier. . Ad hoc networking A device equipped with a Bluetooth radio establishes instant connection to another Bluetooth radio as soon as it comes into range. Since Bluetooth supports both point-to-point and point-to-multipoint connections, several sub-nets can be established and linked together ad hoc. The Bluetooth topology is best described as a multiple sub-net structure.
  • . Multi-protocol support The newest allow an application to use the familiar socket interface to achieve simultaneous access to any number of installed transport protocols. Not like the previous version, WinSock is no longer to use on TCP/IP only. . Asynchronous I/O and event objects With Win32 programming environments, WinSock can extend to communicate asynchronously. Asynchronous I/O enables an application to continue with other processing while waiting for the I/O operation to complete. . Quality of Service The newest WinSock established conventions for applications to negotiate required service levels of communication service such as bandwidth and latency for some quality demanding application such as multimedia communication.
  • . Try to integrate Video Streaming Function into FWLE. If our FWLE can have Video Streaming Function, we can try to use our FWLE to create a new style of learning – students can have lessons outside the classroom. Imagine a geography lesson which needs to study rock that can be carried out at the beach. Also, for medical students, they can see their teacher doing an operation more clearly if there is a camera zooming the operation and all of them carry a thin client device outside the room. . Try to implement our FWLE to work with a database server. Up to now, our FWLE have just a few object. So, we can still manipulate it by programming. However, if the number of objects in our FWLE system increases, to say, the whole physics experiment book of secondary school, then our coding can’t cannot handle all objects well. Thus, we hope to implement our FWLE system with a database server. . Try to extent our project to other thin client devices such as PDA and HPC. For now, the client program we develop is mainly executing on a notebook running Win98. However, if a thinner client such as Palm Pilot or HPC running WinCE, is used, the user can carry the machine more conveniently. Thus, we also hope that we can extent our system to those thin clients to see whether those environments are more suitable for the new learning style.

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Outline of this Presentation 1, Introduction to our FYP 2, Wireless Technology and Architectural Evaluation 3, Hardware Evaluation 4, Introduction to WinSock 5, Introduction to DirectX 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries 7, Our Testing Program 8, Future Plan
  • 3. 1, Introduction to our FYP There are three main Objective for our FYP: 3, Create Wireless Quality Education Service and Content 2, Develop Software and System Infrastructure 1, Provide Wireless Technology and Architectural Evaluation
  • 4. 2, Wireless Technology and Architectural Evaluation 2.1 What is a Wireless LAN? 2.2 Why use Wireless LAN? A wireless local area network (LAN) is a flexible data communications system. Using radio frequency (RF) technology, wireless LANs transmit and receive data over the air. - Mobility - Installation Speed and Simplicity - Installation Flexibility - Reduced Cost-of-Ownership - Scalability
  • 5. 2, Wireless Technology and Architectural Evaluation (Cont’d) 2.3 Some Examples uses of Wireless LAN - Doctors and nurses in hospitals use PDA or HPC with wireless LAN capability deliver patient information instantly - Warehouse workers use wireless LANs to exchange information with central databases, thereby increasing productivity. - Training sites at corporations and students at universities use wireless connectivity to ease access to information, information exchanges, and learning 2.4 Security in Wireless LAN - Many people thin that Wireless LAN should be less secure than traditional wired LAN. - It is not true ! - It is extremely difficult for unintended receivers (eavesdroppers) to listen in on wireless LAN traffic - Complex encryption techniques make it impossible for all but the most sophisticated to gain unauthorized access to network traffic.
  • 6. 2, Wireless Technology and Architectural Evaluation (Cont’d) 2.5 Some Wireless LAN Configurations The use of directional antennas Use of an extension point Multiple access points and roaming A simple wireless peer-to-peer network
  • 7. 3, Hardware Evaluation 3.1 Proxim RangeLan2
  • 8. 3, Hardware Evaluation(Cont’d) 3.1 Proxim RangeLan2 (Cont’d) RangeLAN2 7401/02 PC Card RangeLAN2 Ethernet and Token Ring Access Points
  • 9. 3, Hardware Evaluation(Cont’d) 3.2 Lucnet Technologies WaveLAN
  • 10. 3, Hardware Evaluation(Cont’d) 3.2 Lucnet Technologies WaveLAN (Cont’d) WaveLAN IEEE PC Card WavePOINT-II Access Point
  • 11. 3, Hardware Evaluation(Cont’d) 3.3 Apple iBook Airport
  • 12. 3, Hardware Evaluation(Cont’d) 3.3 Apple iBook Airport (Cont’d) Apple iBook and the Airport station
  • 13. 3, Hardware Evaluation(Cont’d) 3.4 BlueTooth - It is not a Wireless device. - It is a standard for future Wireless communication. - It answers the need for short-range wireless connectivity within three areas: a, Data and Voice access points b, Cable replacement c, Ad hoc networking - It is interface between the communication devices.
  • 14. 4, Introduction to WinSock - WinSock is the network application-programming interface (API) for Microsoft Windows Operating System. - It shields the programmers from the details of low-level network protocol. Physical Network - It includes the most Berkeley sockets API. - It use client/server approach to communicate. - Two fundamental types of client/server application pair exist in WinSock also: connection-oriented and connectionless application . WinSock Application WinSock API Hardware API
  • 15. 4, Introduction to WinSock (Cont’d) Why we use WinSock ? - Multi-protocol support - Asynchronous I/O and event objects - Quality of Service
  • 16. 5, Introduction to DirectX What is Direct X? - Direct X is an API for microsoft windows. - Provide a standard way of accessing many different hardware devices - Consists of five main sections: - DirectDraw (2 dimensional graphics capabilities, surfaces, double buffering, etc) - Direct3D (A relatively extensively functional 3D graphics programming API.) - DirectSound (Sound; 3D sound) - DirectPlay (Simplifies network game development) - DirectInput
  • 17. 5, Introduction to DirectX (Cont’d) Direct X Structure of Direct X: HEL HAL Hardware Request Request Request
  • 18. 5, Introduction to DirectX (Cont’d) Advantages: 1. It provides the lowest possible level access to hardware. 2. Developers no need to concern about the implementation details of that hardware. 3. After installing the newer version of direct x and the computer will support the new hardware automatically. Why use Direct X in our project? 1. We want to write a fancy and interactive application. 2. The generic APIs provided by visual C for sound and graphics are too weak.
  • 19. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries What we have done? A. Direct Draw libraries
        • Encapsulate the implementation details of the Direct Draw.
    B. Direct Sound libraries
        • Encapsulate the implementation details of the Direct Sound.
    C. Our Own Class
        • Manipulate the graphical data.
  • 20. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) A. Direct Draw libraries we created
        • DDStartup();
        • CreateDesktopWindow( Window_handler, Direct_X_object );
        • DDFullConfigure( Direct_X_Object );
        • DDWinConfigure( Direct_X_Object );
    Functions for initialization:
        • DDLoadPalette( Bmp_file, Palette_object );
        • DDLoadBitmap( Bmp_file, Surface_object);
        • DDSetColorKey( Surface_object, Key_color );
    Functions for handling bmp file:
        • DDMakeOffscreenSurface();
        • DDCreateFlipper( Flipper_Object);
        • DDCreateFakeFlipper( Flipper_Object );
        • DDFlipping();
        • DDFillSurface( coordinates, color );
        • DDTextOut ( Surface_object );
    Functions for double buffering:
  • 21. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d)
        • DDLoadPalette( Bmp_file, Palette_object );
    What is Palette? Picture: Content of the picture file:
  • 22. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d)
        • DDSetColorKey( Surface_object, Key_color );
    What is Colorkey? Foreground surface: Color Key: Background surface: Without color key: Using color key:
  • 23. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) B. Direct Sound libraries we created The features of our audio library: 1. Support Wav file with different sample rate. 2. Different sounds can be overlap at the same time. Mixer problem in Direct Sound: The same sound buffer cannot be overlapped itself!
  • 24. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) 1. Create duplicate buffers for the same sound file 2. Create a constant number of buffers, load the sound file into the buffer only when it needs to play. 3. When play a sound buffer, check whether it is being played. If yes, stop the sound and play again from the beginning. 3 possible solutions for the Mixer problem: We have used method 3 for the solving the problem.
  • 25. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) C. Our Own Class We have written 3 class for manipulating the graphical data:
        • For handling the information of picture.
    A. Class “Sprite”
        • For handling the information of Frame.
    B. Class “Frame”
        • For handling the information of Region.
    C. Class “Region”
  • 26. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) Class “Sprite”: We have defined a file type called spt file. Class “sprite” is use to handle the data of a spt file. Sometimes, we will create some objects such as a robot, a man or a dog in our application. Spt file can store the information of those objects. Spt file can link up the information of the object and the pictures of the object together.
  • 27. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) Class “Sprite”: For example, Content of the spt file:
  • 28. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) Class “Frame”: In the previous example, the spt file only store the general information of the pictures. It is not enough! Sometimes, there are interactions between frames. We need to find a systematic approach for storing the interactions. “ Frame” is a class for storing the information and interaction for each frame.
  • 29. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) Class “Region”: Region is an attribute of Frame . It stores the coordinates of a rectangle in the action picture. - Simplify the collision detections between pictures - Regions can represent buttons, different parts of a body or other interactive objects on the picture. The 2 main purposes: For example,
  • 30. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) Example of using our classes:
        • Specification for the refrigerator:
        • The user can open and close the refrigerator by clicking on the handle of the doors.
        • There is a cake inside the refrigerator.
        • The user can eat the cake when click on it.
        • But if the cake can only be eaten once.
  • 31. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) Example of using our own class: Define the region for each frame:
  • 32. 6, Introduction to our Own Libraries (Cont’d) Example of using our own class: DFA for the refrigerator: Content of the spt file: Frame0: Frame1: Frame2: Frame3: Region 0,1 R0: 1 “open refrigerator” R1: 1 “open refrigerator” Region 0 R0: 3 “eat the cake” Region 1 R1: 0 “close refrigerator” Region 0 Region 0,1 Region 1 R0: 3 “cannot eat!” R1: 3 “close refrigerator” R0: 3 “open refrigerator” R1: 2 “open refrigerator”
  • 33. 7, Our Testing Program Program 1 (WinTalk)
  • 34. 7, Our Testing Program Program 1 (WinTalk)
        • 1. Try to use Visual C ++ and Microsoft Foundation Class (MFC).
    Aim for writing this program:
        • 2. Try to use Winsock.
        • 3. .Try to use Asynchronous mode of communication with event-driven
        • programming paradigm
    Outcome:
        • Finally, we have achieved all the goals.
  • 35. 7, Our Testing Program Program 2 (Reversi)
  • 36. 7, Our Testing Program Program 2 (Reversi)
        • 1.Try to get more experience with Visual C ++ and MFC
    Aim for writing this program:
        • 2. Try to use MFC to display bitmap (bmp) files
    Outcome:
        • Finally, we have achieved all the goals.
        • However, we find that the performance for using MFC to display
        • bitmap is extremely poor
  • 37. 7, Our Testing Program Program 3 (Plane)
  • 38. 7, Our Testing Program Program 3 (Plane) Frame pictures: Frame Engine:
  • 39. 7, Our Testing Program Program 3 (Plane)
        • 1. Try to use our Graphical and Audio Libraries.
    Aim for writing this program:
        • 2. Try to use Winsock, Direct Draw and Direct Sound together in
        • the same program.
        • 3. Try to implement the synchronous connection (1 to 1).
    Outcome:
        • Finally, we have achieved all the goals.
        • We have faced some problems when combining Winsock and Direct X
        • libraries together.
  • 40. 7, Our Testing Program Program 4 (Ball)
  • 41. 7, Our Testing Program Program 4 (Ball)
        • 1. Try to combine Winsock and Direct X libraries together
    Aim for writing this program:
        • 2. Try to implement the synchronous connection (1 to 1).
    3. Evaluate the differences between the wire and wireless network Outcome:
        • Finally, we have achieved all the goals.
  • 42. 7, Our Testing Program Program 5 (ChatRoom)
  • 43. 7, Our Testing Program Program 5 (ChatRoom)
        • 1. Try to use write a multi-client program
    Aim for writing this program:
        • 2. Try to write a generic server
        • 3. Try to design a protocol for a application
    Outcome:
        • Finally, we have achieved all the goals.
  • 44. Our Generic Server Server database Client Registration of Client Client Client Client Registered Registered Registered Registration Accept/Error Updated
  • 45. Our Generic Server Server database Client Sending data from Client Send From Server Get all Client info. Send To Server Client Client Client Send From Server Send From Server
  • 46. 8, Fun with Learning English
  • 47. 8, Fun with Learning English
  • 48. 8, Fun with Learning English Aims of writing Fun with Learning English: I. Integrate all of the components and libraries we developed A. Direct Draw B. Direct Sound C. WinSock D. Use of spt files E. Frame Engine F. Chat room G. Generic server
  • 49. 8, Fun with Learning English Aims of writing Fun with Learning English: II. Design a education software for wireless environment A. Fancy and User friendly interface B. Suitable for a wireless environment C. Use of Multi-media D. Allow teacher to design some Interactive Teaching material E. Provide a good Interaction between teacher and students F. Maximize the potential use of our software
  • 50. 9, Future Plan 2, Try to implement our FWLE to work with a database server. 1, Try to integrate Video Streaming Function into FWLE.
    • 3, Try to extent our project to other thin client devices
      • such as PDA and HPC.
    Here is some of our future plan:
  • 51. The End