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2002 Survey Report
 

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    2002 Survey Report 2002 Survey Report Document Transcript

    • UW SYSTEM SURVEY OF TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES 2002 UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SURVEY CENTER 1800 UNIVERSITY AVENUE MADISON, WI 53726
    • UW System Survey of Computing Resources For UW System Administration By Jessica Jakubowski and Matt Sloan UW Survey Center University of Wisconsin – Madison 2002 Any publication, presentation, or news release of these survey research data should include acknowledgement of the University of Wisconsin Survey Center. The proper designation is: University of Wisconsin Survey Center University of Wisconsin-Madison University of Wisconsin 2 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Nearly all faculty and instructional staff have access to a computer at home or at work. Almost 98 percent report having access to a computer in their office and 91 percent report having access at home.  Desktop computers and Windows environments are the most common systems found among faculty members and staff, both at home and in their offices. Ninety-four percent have a desktop computer in their office and 80 percent report using a Windows environment at work. A substantial minority of faculty and staff used Macintosh environments, with 19 percent using Macintosh at work. Similar percentages were found at home.  Faculty make extensive use of computers in their work. Ninety-five percent use computers in teaching preparation. Faculty reported spending an average of 12 hours per week on a computer preparing for classes and approximately 3 hours per week using computers in the classroom.  Eighty-one percent of faculty reported using email in their courses, fifty-nine percent have students use the Web for class, and 49 percent reported using presentation software in class.  Among general computing services, faculty were most aware of the help desk, installation and repair services, and computer training workshops. These three services were also the most frequently used general services.  Faculty and staff reported that on-site staff assistance and installation and repair were the highest quality general services. The most important general services were help desk, on-site staff assistance, and installation and repair.  Faculty are highly “wired.” The majority of faculty are connected to the Internet for work an average of 15 hours or more per week. The most common uses of the Internet are visiting Web sites, accessing on line library catalogs, and accessing online databases.  Among Internet services, faculty were most likely to be aware of, use, evaluate positively, and rate as important electronic library resources and Web browsers.  General ratings of the availability and quality of computing resources on campus were positive. Ninety-two percent of faculty rated the availability of general services as either “very good” or “good.” Eighty-six percent of faculty and staff rated the overall availability of Internet services positively. Nearly three-quarters said they were either “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the information technology resources on campus. University of Wisconsin 3 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    •  Nearly two-thirds of the faculty reported needing training in the use of information technology. Reported need is highest for web page development, presentation graphics, databases, desktop publishing, spreadsheets, and collaborative courseware.  More technology support staff was the highest priority for nearly half of the faculty, while classroom technology and integration technology into instruction came next for over one third of faculty members.  Ninety percent of students reported having access to a computer where they live (excluding residence halls). Eighty-three percent say that they have a computer of their own.  Desktop computers and Windows environments are the most common systems found among students. Of students who said that they had access to a computer where they lived, 86 percent said they had access to a desktop computer and most reported using a Windows environment.  About 48 percent of all students said they used computers five or more times per week for academic work and an additional third reported using a computer two to four times per week.  Among general computing services, students were most likely to be aware of, use, and rate as important general access computer labs, the help-desk, and computer labs at residence halls.  Among Internet services, students were most likely to be aware of, use, evaluate positively, and rate as important electronic library resources, web browsers and student records.  General ratings of the availability and quality of computing resources on campus were positive. Ninety-five percent of students rated the availability as either “very good” or “good,” and 83 percent said they were either “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the information technology resources on campus. Ninety-five percent rated the overall availability of Internet services positively.  Nearly one quarter of the students reported needing training in the use of information technology.  Nearly 40 percent of students said that having additional PCs in computer labs is a top priority. Thirty-eight percent of students selected faster network connections as being one of their highest priorities for improvements to computing resources on campus. University of Wisconsin 4 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.............................................................................................................3 Table of Contents.................................................................................................................5 Introduction..........................................................................................................................7 Purpose.............................................................................................................................7 Population, Methodology and Response Rates................................................................7 The UW System Faculty and Instructional Staff Computing Survey ..........................7 The UW System Student Computing Survey ..............................................................8 Students..............................................................................................................................10 Computer Hardware And Software................................................................................10 Computer Access........................................................................................................10 Computer Use.............................................................................................................12 General Computing And Internet Services.....................................................................13 Awareness of Services................................................................................................13 Use of Services............................................................................................................14 Quality of Services......................................................................................................14 Importance of Services................................................................................................15 Availability of Services...............................................................................................15 Satisfaction with Information Technology.....................................................................15 Training and Additional Resources................................................................................16 Generally, a substantial minority of students needs further training in information technology. Only 23 percent of student respondents reported that they need additional training in computing. The need for training was fairly consistent across campuses, ranging from only 12 percent of students at Whitewater to 28 percent of students at the Madison campus (see Table 22 in the Student Appendix). ...............16 Faculty and Instructional Staff...........................................................................................18 Computer Hardware and Software.................................................................................18 Home Ownership........................................................................................................18 Access at Work...........................................................................................................18 Computer Age.............................................................................................................19 Operating Systems......................................................................................................19 Computer Use ............................................................................................................20 Software......................................................................................................................22 General Computing Services .........................................................................................22 Quality of General Services........................................................................................23 Importance of General Computing Services...............................................................24 Availability of General Computing Services..............................................................25 Internet Services.............................................................................................................25 Internet Services Awareness and Use.........................................................................25 University of Wisconsin 5 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Quality of Internet Services........................................................................................28 Importance of Internet Services..................................................................................28 Availability of Internet Services.................................................................................29 Overall Satisfaction........................................................................................................29 Training and Additional Technology Resources............................................................29 Student Appendix……………………………………………………….………………..30 Faculty Appendix………………………………………………………………………...53 University of Wisconsin 6 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • INTRODUCTION Purpose This study assesses the current use of, satisfaction with, and needs for technology resources in the UW System. This research addresses access to computer and Internet resources; awareness, use, quality, and importance of computing and Internet services; training needs for hardware and software; and desire for additional resources. The survey involved two separate questionnaires, one for faculty and instructional staff and one for students. Population, Methodology and Response Rates The UW System Faculty and Instructional Staff Computing Survey The sample consisted of 1400 faculty and instructional staff employed by the University of Wisconsin System. The Information Technology Office of each of the 13 four year institutions contributed a random sample of 100 of their faculty or instructional staff and 100 faculty or instructional staff names were supplied by the UW Colleges. The survey was conducted by sending three separate e-mail invitations, spaced roughly one week apart, to each faculty or staff person requesting that they go to a survey on the Internet and complete it online. The email included a username and password that was necessary to access the survey. After three e-mails were sent, those who had not yet responded were mailed a paper copy of the questionnaire. The paper copy was identical in content to the Internet survey. The mailing included a cover letter, survey and business reply envelope, as well as a follow up postcard sent out 3 days after the mailing. The surveys were collected in March, April and May 2002. The overall response rate for the faculty and instructional staff survey was 75.2 percent, which was based on 1048 completed questionnaires. The response rate was adjusted for selected respondents who were no longer employed by the University of Wisconsin, selected respondents who were neither faculty nor instructional staff and duplicate respondents. Individual campus response rates range from 86 percent at Stevens Point to 61 percent at Parkside (see Table 1). Of the completed questionnaires, 840 or 80 percent resulted from the Internet survey and 208 or 20 percent resulted from the mailed survey. University of Wisconsin 7 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Table 1. Faculty Response Rates By Campus. Campus Sample Completed Madison 100 70 Milwaukee 100 80 UW Colleges 100 78 Eau Claire 100 70 Green Bay 100 70 La Crosse 100 79 Oshkosh 100 68 Parkside 100 61 Platteville 100 73 River Falls 100 70 Stevens Point 100 86 Stout 100 81 Superior 100 73 Whitewater 100 80 Total 1400 1048 The UW System Student Computing Survey The sample consisted of 7000 students of the University of Wisconsin. The Registrar from each of the 13 campuses contributed a random sample of 500 of their currently enrolled students, and 500 more student names were supplied by the UW Colleges. The survey was conducted by mailing three full mailings including a cover letter, survey and business reply envelope, as well as a follow up postcard sent out 3 days after the first full mailing. An email was also sent to students in advance of the first mailing to alert them that the survey would be arriving. The surveys were collected in March, April and May 2002. The overall response rate for the student staff survey was 60 percent, which was based on 4186 completed questionnaires. The response rate was adjusted for selected respondents who were not enrolled the University of Wisconsin and for duplicate respondents. Individual campus response rates range from 70 percent at River Falls to 52 percent at Superior (see Table 2). University of Wisconsin 8 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Table 2. Student Response Rates, By Campus. Campus Sample Completed Madison 500 329 Milwaukee 500 270 UW Colleges 500 269 Eau Claire 500 289 Green Bay 500 348 La Crosse 500 303 Oshkosh 500 278 Parkside 500 274 Platteville 500 340 River Falls 500 350 Stevens Point 500 313 Stout 500 282 Superior 500 260 Whitewater 500 281 Total 7000 4186 University of Wisconsin 9 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • STUDENTS The student respondents for this survey were comprised mostly of undergraduate students (83 percent), with 18 percent first year students, 21 percent sophomores, 18 percent juniors and 26 percent seniors. Graduate students comprised 13 percent, and special students 4 percent of the respondents. About equal numbers were under age 21 or between the ages of 21 and 25 (39 and 41 percent respectively), with a significant portion between the ages of 26 and 40 (15 percent) and a smaller number of students over age 40 (5 percent).1 There were many more women than men who responded to the survey (60 percent and 40 percent respectively). Over two-thirds of the students who participated in the survey live in off-campus apartments and 31 percent live in on-campus residence halls. A detailed breakdown of student composition by campus can be found in the Student Appendix, Tables 1 through 4. Computer Hardware And Software Computer Access The vast majority of students reported having access to a computer at their residence. Ninety percent of students reported having access to a computer where they live.2 This is up from only 85 of students reporting having access to a computer where they live in 2001 (see Figure 1 below for change in ownership by campus). Also, 83 percent of students reported owning their own computer. This has also increased from 74 percent of students in 2001 who reported owning a computer. At least 83 percent, the vast majority, of students on all campuses reported having access to a computer where they live. Computer access was lowest at the Stevens Point and Superior campuses, with 83 percent and 84 percent respectively reporting access, and was highest at the Whitewater and UW Colleges campuses, with 94 and 93 percent of students reporting access. Computer ownership varied from 75 percent at Stevens Point and Stout to 88 percent at Madison. Detailed information of computer access by campus can be found in the Student Appendix, Tables 5 through 7. Desktop computers (PC-compatible and Macintosh) were the most common form of computer available to students, with 86 percent of students reporting access to desktops. Laptops came in a distant second with 27 percent of students reporting access to laptops (see Figure 2 below). The availability of desktop computers ranged from between 85 percent and 95 percent across campuses, with the exception of Stout (77 percent) and Madison (79 percent). Students at Madison and Stout, however, had the greatest access to laptop computers at their residences (39 percent and 31 percent respectively). UW Colleges and UW Platteville reported the lowest access to laptops, at 14 and 15 percent respectively. 1 One percent declined to answer this question. 2 Excluding residence halls. University of Wisconsin 10 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Figure 1. Change In Student Computer Ownership From 2001-2002.3 UW Colleges 82% 11% Whitewater 88% 10% Superior 79% 8% Stout 75% 3% Stevens Point 75% 11% River Falls 78% 25% Platteville 76% 10% Parkside 86% 5% Oshkosh 79% 5% Milwaukee 85% 6% Madison 88% 12% La Crosse 78% 15% Green Bay -2% 73% Eau Claire 79% 11% -20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120% 2002 Difference in computer ownership between 2002 and 2001 Figure 2. Student Access To Computers, By Type. 86% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 27% 40% 30% 7% 20% 2% 10% 0% Desktop Laptop PDA Other Type of Computer 3 There was a 2 percent decrease in student computer ownership at Green Bay between 2001 and 2002. University of Wisconsin 11 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Computer Use The vast majority of students on all campuses reported using Windows 95, 98 and 2000. Ten percent of students report using a Macintosh operating system (see Table 8 in the Student Appendix). The use of various computer platforms was consistent across campuses. Forty-eight percent of students reported using a computer for academic work five or more times a week, and a further third said they used computers two to four times a week (see Figure 3 below). Only 3 percent said they used a computer less than once a month or never on academic work. Frequent computer use was most commonly reported at the Madison, Stout and Whitewater campuses, where 61, 58, and 53 percent respectively reported using the computer five or more times a week on academic work. Frequent computer use was the least common at the UW Colleges and Parkside with 27 percent and 34 percent, respectively, reporting using the computer five or more times per week. See the Student Appendix, Table 9 for a detailed breakdown by campus. Figure 3. Percent Change in Frequency of Computer Use For Academic Work From 2001 To 2002. Percent in 2001 Percent in 2002 48% 50% 45% 39% 40% 35% 33% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 15% 11% 8% 10% 5% 5% 1% 1% 2% 2% 0% Never Less than 1-3 times a Once a week 2-4 times a 5 or more once a month month week times a week University of Wisconsin 12 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • General Computing And Internet Services Awareness of Services Awareness of general computing services was relatively high among students. Ninety- five percent of students were aware of the general access computer labs on their campus. Awareness was also high for electronic library resources, web browser, student records, help desk, and on-line course registration (see Figure 4 below). However only 34 percent said they were aware of computer training workshops, and only 44 percent said they were aware of newsgroups. Awareness of general access computer labs was consistent across campuses, with between 91 and 99 percent of students reporting awareness across campuses. Figure 4. Student Awareness of General and Internet Services. On-line course registration 83% Web page hosting 50% Student records 89% Internet-based distance education courses 66% Newsgroups 44% Web Browser 90% Electronic Library Resources 94% On-site student assistance 70% General access computer labs on campus 95% Help desk 84% Computer training workshops 34% Computer labs at residence halls 80% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Awareness of computer training workshops was highest at Madison and Green Bay, with 84 percent of students reporting awareness at these campuses. Student awareness of computer training workshops ranged from 41 percent to 44 percent at UW Colleges, Superior, Whitewater, Oshkosh, and Platteville. Tables 10 and 12 in the Student Appendix contain detailed breakdowns by campus. University of Wisconsin 13 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Use of Services Most students (83 percent) reported using electronic library resources, as shown in Figure 5. Use of general access computer labs varied between 67 at UW Colleges and 89 percent at Eau Claire and Whitewater. Also, high percentages of students reported use of general access computer labs on campus (81 percent), student records (78 percent), and web browsers (78 percent). Use of general access computer labs on campus varied from 75 percent at Madison to 91 at Platteville. Student records use varied greatly from 18 percent at Platteville to 92 percent at River Falls. Use of web browsers varied from 69 percent at La Crosse to 86 percent at Stout. Figure 5. Student Use Of General Computing And Internet Resources. On-line course registration 58% Web page hosting 18% Student records 78% Internet-based distance education courses 13% Newsgroups 9% Web Browser 78% Electronic Library Resources 83% On-site student assistance 31% General access computer labs on campus 81% Help desk 46% Computer training workshops 10% Computer labs at residence halls 46% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Only 9 percent of students reported using newsgroups (ranging from 5 percent at La Crosse to 13 percent at Parkside) and only 10 percent used training workshops (ranging from 4 percent at UW Colleges to 14 percent at Eau Claire). More detailed information can be found in Tables 11 and 13 in the Student Appendix. Quality of Services Students were asked to rate the quality of the services that they used. More than half of the students on each of the campuses rated general access computer labs positively. On average, 81 percent of students rated general access computer labs and student records as University of Wisconsin 14 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • very good or good. General access computer labs and student records both received negative ratings (very poor or poor) at an average of only 7 percent across campuses. Newsgroups had the lowest percentage of students (55 percent) who rated its quality as very good or good. There was little difference between campuses in student ratings of electronic library resources, web browsers, newsgroups, Internet-based distance education, web page hosting, computer training workshops, help desk, and on-site student assistance. More detailed information is located in Tables 14 and 15 of the Student Appendix. Importance of Services When students were asked to rate the importance of the different computing resources that they used, the vast majority (91 percent) said that student records were either “very important” or “important” to them. Moreover, 62 percent of students who used this service rated it as “very important.” This rating was generally consistent across the campuses. A vast majority of students across campuses also rated electronic library resources, general access computer labs, online course registration, and web browsers (ranging from 80 percent to 89 percent) as being “very important” or “important.” Of those who used the various general and Internet services, nearly 70 percent reported that help desk and on-site student assistance were either “very important” or “important.” Less than half of students who used the respective services reported Internet-based education courses (48 percent), computer labs at residence halls (47 percent), web page hosting (45 percent), computer training workshops (37 percent), and newsgroups (30 percent) as being “very important” or “important.” About one-quarter of students considered computer training, Internet-based distance education courses and web page hosting as important to them. Lastly, 14 percent of students rated newsgroups as an important service. More details information on all campuses can be found in Tables 18 and 19 of the Student Appendix. Availability of Services The vast majority of students who used general services (95 percent) reported that general computing services were either “very” or “somewhat” available. This sentiment was common to all campuses. Students who used Internet services were just as likely to rate the availability of Internet services similarly. The average across all the campuses was also 95 percent, and the ratings were generally consistent across all the campuses. Table 21 of the Student Appendix contains more detailed information by campus. Satisfaction with Information Technology In rating the overall quality of information technology resources on campus, 83 percent of students reported being either “very satisfied” or “satisfied.” This rating ranged from 72 percent of students at Superior reporting being “very satisfied” or “satisfied” to a high University of Wisconsin 15 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • of 88 percent at Eau Claire and Madison reporting the same. When students were asked to compare their satisfaction with computing resources this year with their satisfaction level last year, 60 percent of students said they were equally satisfied. Another 28 percent said they were more satisfied this year, and 7 percent said they were less satisfied this year.4 The greatest improvement in satisfaction occurred at La Crosse, where 46 percent of students said they were more satisfied this year and the smallest improvement in satisfaction occurred at Stevens Point with 18 percent of students saying they were more satisfied this year. The greatest decrease in satisfaction occurred at Milwaukee, with 11 percent of students saying they were less satisfied this year than they were last year. From 3 to 10 percent of students at the rest of the campuses reported being less satisfied this year as well. More detailed information by campus can be found in Tables 16 and 17 of the Student Appendix. Training and Additional Resources Generally, a substantial minority of students needs further training in information technology. Only 23 percent of student respondents reported that they need additional training in computing. The need for training was fairly consistent across campuses, ranging from only 12 percent of students at Whitewater to 28 percent of students at the Madison campus (see Table 22 in the Student Appendix). Students were asked to prioritize their desire for new or improved technology resources (such as additional computers, software and workshops) by choosing the top three areas where they would like to see improvement. Forty percent of students said that they would like to see additional PCs in the computer labs. The desire for more PCs ranged from 22 percent at Whitewater to 60 percent at Eau Claire. Also, 38 percent of students said would like faster network connections. This ranged from a high at 52 percent of students at River Falls wanting faster network connections to a low at Platteville with only 30 percent wanting faster network connections. Other top priorities for improvement were on-line course registration (36 percent), extended hours in computer labs (32 percent), reducing the cost of laser printing (32 percent), and electronic library resources (24 percent). The desire for improvement in on-line course registration was greatest at Platteville, with 63 percent of students placing this service in their top three priorities for improvement. Between 10 percent and 17 percent of students placed increased computer training, more workshops/training, increased help desk staffing, upgraded software, and upgraded hardware in their top three priorities for improvement. A small percentage (7 percent) of students would like an improvement in space for student web pages. 4 5 percent said they were “not sure.” These percentages do not include those students who were not on campus the previous year (see Table 17 in the Student Appendix). University of Wisconsin 16 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Only 6 percent of students across campuses said they would like to see additional Macs in computer labs. More detailed information about desired improvements in information technology can be found in Table 20 of the Student Appendix. University of Wisconsin 17 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • FACULTY AND INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF The faculty respondents for this survey made up 55 percent of the responses and instructional academic staff comprised 24 percent of the responses. Other respondents were classified staff and non-teaching academic staff and were excluded from the following analysis. Of the faculty responses that were returned, the vast majority were from permanent faculty; however, there were also a considerable number of adjunct or emeritus faculty who completed the survey from some campuses. Male respondents to the faculty and instructional staff survey outnumber females. A detailed breakdown of the faculty and staff composition by campus can be found in the Faculty Appendix, Tables 1, 2, and 3. Computer Hardware and Software Home Ownership In general, faculty and staff have easy access to computers at home. Ninety-one percent reported that they have a computer at home, equivalent to the proportion reported in 2001. The proportion ranged from 85 percent at Stout to 94 percent at the UW Colleges (See Table 4 in the Faculty Appendix). Access at Work In addition to home access, nearly all faculty and staff respondents (98 percent) report having a computer at work. Computer access at work across campuses neither increased nor decreased from the previous year. This proportion ranged from 100 percent of faculty and staff reporting having a computer at work at the Eau Claire, Milwaukee, Stevens Point and Stout campuses to 90 percent at Oshkosh (See Table 5 in the Faculty Appendix). Among all faculty and instructional staff members, 94 percent of the respondents said that they have a desktop computer at work. Seventy-five percent of desktops owned at work were PC-compatible while 19 percent of desktops were Macintosh. One quarter of faculty reported having a laptop and 10 percent reported having a PDA at work. Overall, slightly fewer faculty and staff reported having a desktop and more reported having laptops when compared to 2001. PCs at work ranged across campuses from 96 percent at UW Colleges to 58 percent at Stout. Macintoshes are most prominent at the River Falls and Eau Claire campuses with 31 percent and 29 percent ownership respectively. Only 4 percent of faculty and staff report having a Macintosh at work at UW Colleges. Laptops at work varied considerably across campuses. Laptops at work ranged from 10 percent at the Platteville to 57 percent at Stout. Those who said they had a PDA at work ranged from no one at Oshkosh to 21 percent at Madison (see Table 6 in the Faculty Appendix). University of Wisconsin 18 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Computer Age Respondents were also asked to identify the age of the computers they used most often at work (See Figure 9 below). Only six percent of faculty and staff reported that the computer they used most at work was less than one year old. Over half of faculty and staff reported that their computer at work was less than three years old. 17 percent reported using computers at work that were 5 years old or older. A detailed breakdown of computer age by campus can be found in Table 7 of the Faculty Appendix. Figure 6. Age of computer used most at work 24% 24% 25% 17% 17% 20% 15% 12% 10% 6% 5% 0% Less than 1 2 3 4 5 or more 1 Computer age in years Operating Systems The operating platform most widely used at home and at work is a Windows environment, including Windows 95, 98, 2000, ME, XP and NT, with 80 percent of faculty and staff reporting that they use a variant of this system at home and 86 percent at work (see Figure 7). The next most widely used operating platform is Macintosh, with 19 percent and 18 percent of faculty reporting that they use it at home and at work, respectively. Windows ME was used 10 percent and 2 percent at home and work respectively. Windows XP was used at home by 8 percent of the faculty and was used at work by 3 percent of the faculty. Win NT was used by 12 percent of faculty at work but only 3 percent used it at home. More detailed breakdowns of faculty and staff use of various operating systems at home and work by campus are located in Tables 8 and 9 of the Faculty Appendix. University of Wisconsin 19 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Figure 7. Percentage of Faculty Using Operating Systems at Home and at Work. Home Work 35% 32% 30% 30% 28% 25% 19% 20% 18% 16% 15% 12% 12% 10% 9% 10% 8% 3% 3% 3% 3% 5% 2% 2% 2% 0% M acintosh Linux Windows Windows Windows Windows Windows Windows Other 95 98 2000 ME XP NT Operating Platform Computer Use Faculty and staff make extensive use of various computer resources in their work. Ninety-five percent of all respondents said they use their own or university computers for teaching preparation. Of all respondents, 57% reported using a computer in the classroom. On average, faculty report using computers 12 hours per week in teaching preparation—3 hours more per week on average than 2001. Faculty also spend an average of three additional hours per week using computers in the classroom. A detailed breakdown of computer use for teaching preparation and for classroom use can be found in Tables 11 and 12 of the Faculty Appendix. Faculty used a variety of computer resources in their courses in the past two years. Of those faculty and staff teaching courses in the past two years, the computer resource used most frequently on all the campuses is e-mail. As seen in Figure 8, 81 percent of these respondents reported using e-mail and 59 percent have students use the web in their courses. About one half of the faculty used online library resources and presentation University of Wisconsin 20 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • software in the classroom. Twenty-one percent of faculty utilized collaborative courseware in the classroom. The least used computer resources include laptops used by students and web online testing each with seven percent reporting using these resources in courses. Figure 8. Computing Resources In the Classroom For Faculty Members Who Taught Courses In The Past 2 Years. Other 3% Live internet demonstrations 13% On line library resources 48% Laptop use by students 7% Computer labs 22% On line testing 7% Collaborative courseware 21% Personally developed courseware 11% Commercial courseware 13% Presentation software 49% Have students use web 59% Web page created by instructor 28% Web page created by students 8% Computer simulations/exercises 30% Email 81% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Use of these resources varied considerably across campuses. E-mail is used most frequently at Eau Claire with 98% of faculty and staff reporting using it in their courses. Ninety-two percent of faculty and staff at the Parkside campus reported using e-mail in their courses. Email is used least frequently at Madison where 58 percent of respondents said they use it in courses. Having students use the web for courses varied across campuses from 48 percent at Madison to 82 percent at Green Bay. Many faculty and staff also said they used presentation software in their courses, ranging from 31 percent at UW Colleges to 62 percent at Whitewater. Another popular resource for courses was online library resources with use ranging from 37 percent at Platteville to 65 percent at Stevens Point. Use of computer simulations and exercises ranged from 16 percent at Madison to 43 percent at Platteville. Instructor-created web pages ranged from 13 percent at River Falls to 37 percent at Stout. Computer labs were used by 12 percent of the faculty and staff at Eau Claire to 37 percent of those at Whitewater. Use of collaborative courseware ranged from 37 percent at River Falls to only 5 percent at University of Wisconsin 21 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Madison. A detailed breakdown of computer resources used in courses is located in Table 10 of the Faculty Appendix. Software Faculty were also asked about their use of different types of software. Information library services/databases, spreadsheets, and presentation software were the most commonly used types of software, reported as being used “often” by 43, 39 and 39 percent of faculty and staff, respectively. Other commonly used software applications include group scheduling/calendar/personal information manager software and collaborative courseware (18 and 16 percent respectively). More detailed information about the software use by campus can be found in Table 15 of the Faculty Appendix. General Computing Services Awareness of different general computing services varied (See Figure 9). Faculty members reported being most aware of the computer training workshops and help desk, with 94 and 90 percent of faculty and staff reporting awareness of those services respectively. The general computing services of which faculty and staff are least aware include documentation materials and multimedia design and development, with 44 and 54 percent respectively reporting awareness of those services. University of Wisconsin 22 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Figure 9. Faculty Awareness and Uses of General Computing Services. 100% 94% 90% 90% 79% 80% 73% 72% 70% 66% 58% 60% 54% 50% 46% 50% 44% 40% 30% 20% 16% 20% 13% 10% 0% Computer Installation Help desk Document- Multimedia Internet- On-site staff training and repair ation design and based assistance workshops materials development distance education Aware Use The general computing services that most faculty and staff use are the help desk (73 percent) and installation and repair services (58 percent). Use of help desk services varied considerably, with nearly one-third of the faculty and staff at the UW Colleges to 92 percent at Whitewater reporting using the help desk. Forty-two percent of respondents at the Green Bay reported using installation and repair services while 83 percent of those at Superior reported using this service. The least used services include multimedia design and development and Internet-based distance education, with 13 and 16 percent respectively reporting using these services. More detailed breakdowns of awareness and use of general services by campus can be found in Tables 18 and 19 of the Faculty Appendix. Quality of General Services Faculty members who used the general computing services were asked to rate the quality of each service (See Figure 10). The services rated most highly (either as “very good” or University of Wisconsin 23 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • “good”) by faculty and instructional staff include on site staff assistance and installation and repair, each with 81 percent rating those services positively. In addition, in each instance, the majority of faculty who used general services rated them positively. A detailed breakdown of the ratings of general computing services by campus is located in Table 22 of the Faculty Appendix. Figure 10. Faculty Evaluation of General Computing Services. 5% 6% 8% 11% 6% 5% 5% 100% 90% 13% 15% 20% 20% 27% 80% 34% 34% 70% 60% 50% 40% 81% 81% 75% 73% 68% 30% 60% 55% 20% 10% 0% Computer Installation and Help desk Documentation Multimedia Internet-based On-site staff training repair Materials design & distance assistance workshops development education Good Neither Poor Importance of General Computing Services Faculty members who used general computing services were also asked to rate how important each service was to them. Ratings of the importance of the services were generally high with over half of the faculty rating each service as “very important” or “important” to them. Ratings were highest for installation and repair, the help desk, and on-site staff assistance (92, 91, and 90 percent respectively). Multimedia design and development received the least positive importance rating with 56 percent of faculty rating its importance positively. See Table 24 in the Faculty Appendix for more detailed information on the importance of general services. University of Wisconsin 24 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Availability of General Computing Services Ninety-two percent of those faculty members who reported trying to use general services rated the overall availability of general computing services as either “very available” or “somewhat available.” Moreover, 42 percent of faculty and staff rated general services as “very available.” Another half of faculty and staff rated general services as “somewhat available.” More detailed information on availability of general services by campus can be found in Table 29 of the Faculty Appendix. Internet Services As seen in Figure 11, most faculty and instructional staff report using websites, e-mail, FTPs, etc. through the Internet frequently. Forty-five percent of respondents report spending more than 10 hours per week being connected to the Internet for work. An additional 25 percent of faculty and staff report spending between 6 and 10 hours each week connected to the Internet for work. Thirty percent of faculty and staff spend between 0 and 5 hours each week connected to the Internet (less than 1 percent of faculty and staff report spending no time at all). Internet access is fairly consistent across campuses. A detailed breakdown by campus can be found in Table 13 of the Faculty Appendix. Figure 11. Length of Time Connected to Internet for Work Per Week. More than 10 45% Hours per week 6 to 10 25% 0 to 5 30% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Internet Services Awareness and Use Faculty and instructional staff were asked to indicate which Internet services they were aware of and used. Average awareness among faculty and staff was greatest for electronic library resources, with 84 percent reporting awareness of this service. Seventy-seven percent of faculty and staff reported awareness of web browsers and 73 percent reported awareness of electronic student records. The service of which faculty and staff are least aware is web site hosting with 42 percent reporting awareness. More detailed information about awareness of Internet services is located in Table 20 of the Faculty Appendix. University of Wisconsin 25 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • The most common use of the Internet was for visiting web sites. Ninety-three percent of faculty and staff report using the Internet for visiting websites (see Figure 12 below). These responses ranged from 85 percent at Superior to 96 percent at Parkside and La Crosse. Sixty-nine percent of faculty reported using the Internet to obtain course materials (ranging from half of the faculty at Madison to 83 percent at Parkside). Sixty- seven percent use the Internet to access online library catalogs. These responses ranged from 47 percent at Platteville to 84 percent at Milwaukee. Fifty-eight percent of faculty and staff report using the Internet in order to access online databases and to access on line library resources. Fifty-six percent use the Internet to download files from distant locations. Use of access to online databases varied across campuses from 36 percent at Green Bay to 65 percent at Stevens Point. Downloading files from distant locations ranges from 39 percent at the UW Colleges to 76 percent at Milwaukee. Table 14 of the Faculty Appendix contains more information on Internet use by campus. Figure 12. Faculty Internet Use. Does not use internet 1% Other internet use 10% On line library resources 58% On line library catalog 67% Distance education/ Professional development activities 20% Read or post to Usenet news groups 12% Download files from distant locations 56% Access on-line databases 58% Subscribe to listservs 39% Visit websites 93% Course materials 69% Video Conferencing 3% 0% 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 % % % % % % % % % % Many faculty and staff use the Internet to exchange information with groups or lists. Thirty-nine percent of faculty and staff subscribe to listervs and 12 percent read or post to Usenet news groups. Also, 20 percent of faculty and staff say they use the Internet to take distance education or professional development courses. Detailed information about Internet use by campus is located in Table 14 of the Faculty Appendix. The Internet service used most widely were electronic library services, with 67 percent of faculty and staff reporting using it (see Figure 13 below). Nearly as many faculty (65 percent) reported using web browsers. Use of these services varied little across University of Wisconsin 26 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • campuses. Forty percent of faculty use student records and 42 percent use dial-in Internet access. The least used service was web site hosting (16 percent reporting use). A detailed breakdown of this information by campus is located in Table 21 of the Faculty Appendix. Figure 13. Faculty Awareness and Use of Internet Services. 90% 84% 77% 80% 71% 67% 70% 65% 63% 60% 50% 48% 50% 42% 42% 40% 40% 29% 30% 30% 16% 20% 10% 0% Dial-in Electronic FT P T elnet Web Student Web site library browser records hosting resources Aware Use University of Wisconsin 27 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Quality of Internet Services The majority of faculty generally who used Internet services rated them positively (See Figure 14). The services rated most highly (either as “very good” or “good”) by faculty and staff include electronic library resources and Web browsers, with 87 and 84 percent respectively rating those services positively. Dial-in, FTP and Telnet are also rated highly, with 72, 71and 71 percent respectively of respondents rating these services positively. Sixty-six percent of faculty who used Internet services rated web site hosting, and student records positively. A detailed breakdown of the ratings of Internet services by campus is located in Table 23 of the Faculty Appendix. Figure 14. Faculty Evaluation of Internet Services. 9% 3% 3% 5% 2% 11% 4% 100% 10% 14% 90% 26% 24% 20% 30% 80% 23% 70% 60% 50% 87% 84% 40% 72% 71% 71% 66% 66% 30% 20% 10% 0% Dial-in Electronic FTP Telnet Web Student Web site library browser records hosting resources Good Neither Poor Importance of Internet Services Faculty who used Internet services rated electronic library resources as most important, with 91 percent rating this service as “very important” or “important.” In addition, 87 percent of respondents rated web browser services similarly. Dial-in services and student records were rated highly by 82 percent of respondents each. Sixty-seven percent of faculty and staff said that FTP services are very important or important. Detailed information of importance ratings by faculty and staff can be found in Table 25 of the Faculty Appendix. University of Wisconsin 28 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Availability of Internet Services Overall, faculty and staff rated Internet services as generally being available. Forty-three percent of faculty and staff rated Internet services as being very available, ranging from 32 percent at Oshkosh to 57 percent at Stevens Point. Another 43 percent of faculty and staff rated Internet services as being somewhat available. A detailed breakdown by campus is located in Table 29 of the Faculty Appendix. Overall Satisfaction Nearly three-quarters of faculty and staff reported being “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the overall quality of information technology services (24 percent and 48 percent respectively). Among those who were very satisfied, the range across campuses is from 15 percent at Milwaukee to 43 percent at Stevens Point. Dissatisfaction levels were low on average but varied considerably across campuses. A detailed breakdown of this rating is available in Table 26 of the Faculty Appendix. Of those who were employed during the previous year, 83% reported being at least as satisfied this year as they were last year, with 19 percent of faculty and staff saying they were more satisfied this year and 63 percent saying they were equally satisfied this year as last year. An average of 10 percent of respondents said they were less satisfied this year, ranging from 2 percent at Parkside to 18 percent at Milwaukee and UW Colleges. More detailed information on change in satisfaction by campus can be found in Table 27 of the Faculty Appendix. Training and Additional Technology Resources Nearly two-thirds of all the faculty and staff that responded reported needing training in the use of information technology. The most common areas in which respondents would like to have training include web page development (32 percent), presentation graphics (30 percent) and desktop publishing (26 percent). Reported need was also high for databases with 25 percent of faculty and staff desiring training, collaborative courseware with 24 percent saying they need training, and spreadsheets with 23 percent. Desire for training varied between 14 and 19 percent of faculty and staff for applications such as electronic conferencing, group scheduling, information library services, statistical tools, and paint/draw tools. The areas in which the there is least desire for training include mathematics tools, programming languages, and geographical information systems. Additional information by campus is located in Tables 16 and 17 of the Faculty Appendix. Faculty were asked to prioritize their desire for new or improved technology resources by choosing the top three areas where they would like to see improvement. Forty-five percent of faculty and staff reported wanting an improvement in tech support staff. The desire for improved tech support staff ranged from 30 percent at UW Colleges to 57 percent at Superior. University of Wisconsin 29 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources
    • Also, 40 percent of faculty and staff said they would like new or improved classroom technology. This ranged from a high of 53 percent of faculty at Eau Claire to a low at Madison with only 32 percent wanting new or improved classroom technology. Other top priorities for new or improved information technologies were assistance in integrating technology into instruction (39 percent), desktop computer replacement (35 percent), training in software (35 percent), desktop computer upgrade (27 percent), faster network connections (24 percent), and curriculum and instruction software (23 percent). Only five percent of faculty and staff would like new or improved video conferencing. More detailed information about desired improvements in information technology can be found in Table 28 of the Faculty Appendix. University of Wisconsin 30 UW System Survey of Survey Center Technology Resources