Ksu safe space 7 12-13

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Kent State University Safe Space Program-Developed by Roxie Patton

Kent State University Safe Space Program-Developed by Roxie Patton

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  • No Sole Possessor of Knowledge- Meaning that nobody in this room knows everything there is to know about this topic. While I may be a perceived expert I make mistakes and there are things I don’t know.Take Risks in order to grow together.Make mistakes without judgment, we are all coming from different mindsets and we need to learn from each other instead of judging.Respect others’ feelings, confidentiality, and opinions. What is shared in this room should stay within this room.Cell phones off.Ouch Rule- Because we are dealing with difficult and personal topics, the ouch rule is in place. This rule simply means that if somebody uses terminology or makes a statement which causes personal offense to another member of this group, we address that behavior and move on by no longer using that term.If everyone can agree to these terms than we can move forward with the presentation.
  • Give everyone a chance to share personal information, and create a more relaxed atmosphere in the room.
  • WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN: This activity is most impactful when the facilitator reads in a soft, even voice that encourages introspection. Read the following out loud, allowing for pauses as needed for movement and impact:Begin by writing your name in the middle of the star, making it your own. Then, pick a point of the star to begin with. Chose a friend who is very close to you; someone you care about very much. A best friend, a close friend, it does not matter. Write their name on this point.Next, think of a community to which you belong. It could be a religious community, your neighborhood, fraternity, sorority, or just a group of friends. Take the name of this group that you are a part of and write it on the next point of the star moving clockwise.Now, think of a specific family member. Someone that you have always turned to for advice or maybe knows how to cheer you up when you are sad. A mother, father, aunt or uncle… a family member who has made a large impact on your life. Please write their name on the next point of the star.What job would you most like to have? It could be anything from president to dentist. Whatever your career aspiration is, write it on the next point.Lastly, what are some of your hopes and dreams? Maybe you want to be a millionaire or maybe you want the perfect family. Think of a few of your hopes and dreams and write them on the last point of your star.Everyone please stand up and form a circle.You are now in the minority in relation to sexual orientation or gender identity (i.e. gay men, bisexual individual, lesbian, or transgender) and you are about to begin your coming out process. During this process, I ask that you not talk. You decide that it will be easiest to tell your friends first since they have always been there for you in the past and you want them to know. If you have a blue star, your friend has no problem with it. Your friend has suspected for some time, and thanks you for sharing. Luckily, your friend acts no different toward you and accepts you for who you are.If you have a white or yellow star, your friend is rather hesitant. Your friend is a little irritated that you have waited so long to share this information, but you are confident that soon this friend will understand that being gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender is just part of who you are… you just need to give this individual some time. Please fold back this point of your star.If you have a red star, you are met with anger and disgust. This friend who has been by your side in the past tells you that being gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender is wrong and cannot associate with anyone “like that.” If you have a red star please tear off this side and drop it to the floor; this friend is no longer part of your life.With most of you having such good luck with your friends, you decide to tell your family. So, you turn to the family member who is closest to you first so that it will be a little easier.If you have a yello star, the conversation does not go as exactly as planned, but after some lengthy discussion this person who is close to you seem a little more at ease with it. Fold this point of your star back as this individual will be an ally, but only with time.If you have a blue star, you are embraced by this family member. Your family member is proud that you have decided to come out and let you know that this individual will always be there to support you.If you have a white or red star, your family member rejects the thought of being related to a gay man, bisexual, lesbian, or transgender person. Much like some of your friends, this individual is disgusted and some of you are thrown out or even disowned. You are part of the approximate 40% of homeless youth who identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. If you have a white or red star, please tear off this side and drop it to the ground.Having told some of your friends and family, the wheels have started to turn and soon members of your community begin to become aware of your sexual orientation or gender identity.If you have a yellow or blue star, your sexual orientation or gender identity is accepted by your community. They continue to embrace you like any one else and together you celebrate the growing diversity in your community.If you have a white star, you are met with a mixed response. Some accept you and some do not know what to think. You remain a part of the community and, with time, you will fit in as you once did. If you have a white star, please fold back this side.If you have a red star, your community reacts with hatred. They tell you that someone like you does not belong in their community. Those who had supported you in your times of need no longer speak to you or acknowledge you. If you have a red star, tear this point off and drop it to the ground.You have heard that rumors have started circulating at work regarding your sexual orientation or gender identity. In the past, you have made it a point to confront these rumors as soon as they began, but now you are not sure if that will do more harm than good. Unfortunately, you do not have the chance.If you have a blue star, your coworkers begin to approach you and let you know that they have heard rumors and that they do not care, they support you. Your bosses react the same way, letting you know that you do good work and that is all that matters.If you have a yellow star, your workplace has become quite interesting. Everyone seems to think that you are gay or transgender, even though you have not mentioned it to anyone or confirmed any of the rumors. Some people speak to you less, but the environment has not seemed to change drastically. If you have a yellow star, please fold back this point.If you have a red or white star, you continue to work as though nothing is happening, ignoring the rumors that have spread throughout your workplace. One day, you come in to find your office has been packed up. You are called into the office and your boss explains that you are being fired. When you ask why, your boss tells you that the organization had to make some cutbacks in your area. If you have a red or white star, please tear this point off and drop it to the ground.Now your future lay ahead of you as a gay man, bisexual, lesbian, or transgender person: your hopes and dreams, your wishes for the perfect life… for some of you, these are all that remain.If you have a yellow, blue or white star, these hopes and dreams are what keep you going. Most of you have met with some sort of rejection during your coming out process, but you have managed to continue to live a happy, healthy life. Your personal hopes and dreams become a reality.If you have a red star you fall into despair. You have met with rejection after rejection and you find it impossible to accomplish your lifelong goals without the support of your friends and family. You become depressed and with nowhere else to turn, some of you begin to abuse drugs or alcohol. Eventually you feel that your life is no longer worth living. If you have a red star please tear it up and drop the pieces to the ground. You are part of the 30% of teenage suicide victims who are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender. DISCUSSION PROMPTS:How did this activity make you feel? [You could ask follow up questions by color]After participating in this activity, are you thinking any differently about the coming out process?How did it feel to rip the corner off a star? How did it feel to fold it back?Why do you think that this activity happens in silence?If it does not come up organically, transition by saying that for many LGBTQ people, this experience happens in silence, this is why we need allies to reach out. 
  • Sexuality is experienced on a spectrum where each of us fall. On one side we have asexual and on the other we would have sexual or even hypersexual.Asexual-a person who does not experience sexual attraction towards individuals of any gender, but may have romantic attraction. Asexual is also viewed as an umbrella term for other identities including but not limited to demisexual and Gray-A.This does not mean that asexual people do not engage in relationships.This does not mean that asexual people do not have a sex drive.This simply means that there is no sexual attraction to other peopleDemisexual- a person who does not experience sexual attraction without first forming a strong emotional connection with a person. When meeting someone new there is no initial sexual attraction.Gray-Asexual or Grey Ace- a personwho identifies somewhere along the asexual spectrum meaning that they may experience sexual attraction rarely or only under certain circumstance.
  • Sexual orientation-A person's attraction to members of the same and/or opposite sex. This attraction can be emotional, spiritual, physical, and/or sexual. Sexual orientation includes gay, lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual, among others. Romantic orientation-  a feeling that causes people to desire a romantic relationship with a specific other person. Many asexual people experience romantic attraction even though they do not feel sexual attraction. Sometimes this romantic attraction is directed towards a specific gender, giving asexuals who experience it a "romantic orientation" that is different from their sexual orientation.Each living person, regardless of sexual orientation has both a sexual orientation and a romantic orientation. For some people these two identities are congruent. For example, a person may be heterosexual, meaning that they are sexually attracted to people of the opposite gender, and heteroromantic, mean that they have a romantic desire to be with someone of the opposite gender. For others, particularly those under the asexual umbrella, these two may not be congruent. For example someone with an asexual sexual orientation has zero desire to engage in a sexual relationship with others, but they may have any of the romantic attractions and engage in romantic relationships.
  • Rejection by partner or potential partners- For partners who are sexual it may be difficult to understand an asexual persons lack of desire to engage in sexual activities. For this reason many asexual persons are pressure into having sex or rejected by their partnersConfusion from parents and other loved ones- because little information is known about Asexuality, sometimes even supportive loved ones might express that an asexual person is in a phase or just hasn’t met the right person yet. Self loathing-the pressure to conform to a sexualized society often leads asexual people to disdain their sexuality leading them to have a desire to “fix their sexuality”Desire to “fix” sexuality- in an effort to “fix” themselves, asexual persons might engage inPromiscuityDrug/Alcohol abuseSelf Harm/SuicideStereotypesFrigid , “need to find the right person, “it’s a phase”, mental illness, etc…
  • Sexual orientation much like sexuality is experienced on a continuum. Many theorists believe that no person is stationary on this continuum but that attractions can fluctuate. This does not mean that each person will engage in sexual experiences outside of their regular orientation, merely that they will experience attraction outside of their regular orientation.Not that sexual orientation is linked to heart on our genderbread person. Your sexual orientation describes who you are attracted to, who you fall in love with.
  • Gay-Man identified people who are exclusively attracted to men. This attraction can be emotional, spiritual, physical, and/or sexual. This term is sometimes used as a quick reference for the entire LGBTQA community, but this use is not acceptable as it reinforces the erasure of other sexual identities. Same Gender Loving (SGL) and Man who has sex with men (MSM)-Commonly used in communities of color as the larger LGBTQ movement has often been viewed as hostile or indifferent toward communities of color.Lesbian-Woman identified people who are exclusively attracted to women. This attraction can be emotional, spiritual, physical, and/or sexual. Heterosexual-A person who is exclusively attracted to people of the opposite gender. This attraction can be emotional, spiritual, physical, and/or sexual.
  • Multi-Gender Attraction- People who are attracted to others of more than one gender.Nonmonosexual-a person who is attracted to more than one gender. The term is also viewed as an umbrella term for other identities including but not limited to bisexual, pansexual, omnisexual, and pollyamorous.Bisexual-A person who is attracted to two specific genders most commonly man and woman, but may be expanded to other genders. Pansexual-A person who is attracted to people regardless of sex/gender/gender expression. Pansexual people are attracted to who the person is rather than sex/gender/gender expression. This term is often used interchangeably with Omnisexual.Polyamorous-a person who engages in more than one romantic relationship at a time, with the consent of all parties involved. This may include relationships where all involved are in a simultaneous relationship with all others involved or relationships in which one person is involved in multiple relationships but the other is exclusive.Common misconceptions of nonmonosexualidentites are that they are promiscuous, “can not make up their minds”, are unfaithful, or that they are unsure of their sexual identities and are therefor simply experimenting before making a final determination.
  • Biological sex- your sex assigned at birth based on primary sexual characteristics. While sex is typically viewed as a binary some people are born with various characteristics that put them outside of the strict categories of male and female.Note that sex points to our primary sex organs on our gender bread man, meaning that this is strictly decided by your physical biology.
  • Note that the term intersex had previously been known as hermaphrodite, this term is no longer acceptable and is viewed as a slur. Intersex-a general term used for a variety of conditions in which a person is born with a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn’t seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male. For example, a person might be born appearing to be female on the outside, but having mostly male-typical anatomy on the inside. Or a person may be born with genitals that seem to be in-between the usual male and female types. Another example would be a person who may be born with mosaic genetics, so that some of their cells have XX chromosomes and some of them have XY.
  • Gender is another term that is often viewed as existing only in binary terms: man or woman. However, gender can be experienced on a continuum as well. Gender Identity-One’s understanding of self as being man, woman, or other gender.Note that gender identity is linked to the mind on our genderbread person. This is a how person thinks about or views their own gender.
  • Binary Genders- genders which stick within the strict binary gender categories of man and woman.Cisgender-A person whose gender matches their sex assigned at birth. For example, they were born with male primary sex organs, and as they grew into adulthood they viewed themselves and understood their gender as being man.Transgender- An umbrella term for people whose gender identity, expression or behavior is different from those typically associated with their assigned sex at birth, including but not limited to transsexuals, crossdressers, androgynous people, gender fluid, genderless, genderqueers, and gender non-conforming people. Sometimes just called “Trans”.Transexual-A person who identifies as a gender opposite of that associated with their sex assigned at birth. Note that for both of these identities that the person is switching from one binary gender to another. While some transsexual persons may wish to alter their body through hormone therapy or sex reassignment surgery, this is not always the case. Gender confirmation surgery can cost more than ten thousand dollars and the health risks are very serious. As societies views of gender change, many transexual individuals are accepting that their bodies do not always have to match their identities.
  • Nonbinary Genders- genders experienced outside the gender binary system. These genders are neither man or woman or exist as a combination of the two.Gender Queer/Third Gender- a gender that is neither man or woman but something outside of the Western binary view of gender. This identity is a new gender category which may have aspects of both man and woman or of neither man or woman.Gender Fluid- an identity used by a person who experiences their gender as fluctuating along a continuum rather than being concrete.Gender Neutral- an identity used by a person who does not identify as having any genderTwo-Spirit- a term commonly used to define trans* people within indigenous cultures. Prior to Western colonization, it was common for groups of indigenous people to have 4 or more gender categories. Most notably, Navajo people are known to have had four gender categories one for men, one for women, one for masculine women, and one for feminine men. These “two-spirit’ people who revered in their communities for having the wisdom of both men and women. These people were often charged to be shaman, leaders, and to raise children who were abandoned or orphaned. Unfortunately, following colonization, many native populations are not accepting of nonbinary genders.
  • These are outliers, because while they are often viewed as gender identities neither of these categories are actually identity.(Photos 1. Eddie Izzare a famous crossdresser/actor/comedian and 2. Ru Paul a famous drag queen/ entertainer)Cross-dresser- (previously known as transvestite which is now considered and offensive slur)A person who dresses in clothing that is not typically associated with their sex assigned at birth. Cross-dressers typically have no intent on living full-time as the gender not associated with their sex assigned at birth and do not identify as having a gender other than that matching their sex assigned at birth.Cross-dressers are most mostly male as females have more flexibility in attire (i.e. pants for women vs. a dress for men) and are most often heterosexual. Cross-dressing is also commonly done in private as there is an unfortunate social stigma attached to it. Drag Kings/Queens- A person who uses gender as a form of entertainment. This person will typically present and exaggerated form of the gender opposite their sex assigned at birth.
  • Gender Expression-How one presents their gender identity to other people. Gender expression can be presented in clothing, hairstyle, facial hair, behavior, voice, and body characteristics. Gender expression may also be experienced along a continuum. Note that expression points to the outline around our gender bread person. This is what is we display on the outside of our bodies.
  • Masculine- a presentation that matches what is typically expected of men.Feminine- a presentation that matches what is typically expected of women.Androgynous- a presentation which does not match either binary gender and may be a blend of the two.Fluid- a presentation of gender that floats along the continuum.
  • Feminine Pronouns- pronouns used for women identifying people she/her/hersMasculine Pronouns- pronouns used for man identifying people he/him/hisGender Neutral Pronouns- common pronouns used for trans* identifying people. ***** IMPORTANT, if you do not know what pronouns a person prefers and are unsure of their gender, ASK!***** they/them/theirs, Ze/Zir/Zirs, or Ze/Hir/Hirs
  • When we put all of these pieces together, we complete our gender bread person. Remember that regardless of whether or not a person identifies as LGBTQ they have an identity on each of this continuum. Also remember that each of these pieces: identity, orientation, sex, and expression exist separately within each of us. One will not dictate the other. So someone could be a heterosexual, male, who identifies as a man, but expresses his gender in a feminine way.
  • Panel members will introduce themselves with their name, year, major, coming out story, and experiences on campus. Following this, students will open for questions.
  • Divide the room into four even groups. Each groups will get one of the case studies and ten minutes to come up with how the university should address this issue.
  • Ask Group 1 to read their case allowed and share their action plan.Key pointsStudent has lost family support.Student has likely lost financial support.Student has lost steady housing.Students is not involved and maybe feeling aloneAction ItemsAddress crisis first! Contact Residence Services to see if we can set up a safe house for student to stay on campus until more secure housing plans can be established.Connect student to counseling.Connect student to Women’s Center food pantry.Connect student to LGBTQ Center and Pride!Kent.The LGBTQ Center has an LGBT Emergency fund to help students in crisis situations like this one.
  • Ask Group 3 to read their case allowed and share their action plan.Key pointsHow did the professor respond? Should the professor take sensitivity training?What was the film and how did it fit into the curriculum of the course?Was the professor aware of the student’ trans*identity?Action ItemsAsk the student what their expectations are and help them form realistic expectations.Facilitate conversation with faculty member regarding trans* sensitivity and over resources to educate class on trans*identities.Connect student to counseling.Connect student to LGBTQ Center and Pride!Kent.
  • Ask Group 4 to read their case allowed and share their action plan.Key pointsHave the students violated code of conduct?Is the residence hall a hostile space for Jessica?Jessica may not be able to trust her roommate or feel safe with her roommateAction ItemsAsk the student what their expectations are and help them form realistic expectations.If necessary report students to student conduct.Facilitate conversation with roommates through residence services.Offer LGBTQ focused programming in hall.Connect student to counseling.Connect student to LGBTQ Center and Pride!Kent.
  • The LGBTQ Center offers a variety of resources and programs. The Center carries pamphlets on topics like coming out, safe sex, and talking to your friends and family about sexual and gender identities. In addition to pamphlets the Center is also stocked with Safe Sex supplies which include condoms, dental dams, female condoms, and lubricant.Additionally, the Center offers many ways to get connected. There are four identity based discussion groups which meet bi-weekly. Sons of the Spectrum for those who identify as men and are attracted to men. Womyn Loving Womyn for those who identify as womyn and are attracted to womyn. Queer People of Color or Q-POC for people who identify as both a racial/ethnic minority and a member of the LGBTQ community. And Trans*formers for those who identify somewhere under the transgender umbrella.There are also a variety of social programs including kick off parties for fall and spring semesters, the semi-annual Queer Voices Art Show, and Queer Community Dinners and game nights.Finally, the Center is working to recognize the accomplishments of our LGBTQ Community and this why we are now offering a Lavender Graduation Ceremony for LGBTQ students and their allies.Please remember that all programs are open to faculty, staff, and community members.
  • This is the logo that you will receive for your door if you chose today to commit to being a Safe Space Ally. A circle was selected for our primary shape as a symbol of inclusion. The upside down triangle is a commonly used symbol in LGBTQ activism and was reclaimed from the pink triangles used to mark “homosexuals” in Nazi Germany. The rainbow colors are representative of the LGBTQ Pride Flag. Finally, our gender infinity symbol represents the innumerable possibilities of gender identities and includes a gray question mark for those who may be questioning their identities.
  • At this time, ask participants to take out their pledges and read them.If you do not feel comfortable with any part of this pledge please do not sign it. You will not be judged, and we will not share this information with anyone. Once you have completed your pledge, please complete your post-training survey. When you have finished, please bring your pre and post training surveys and pledge to the front to receive your signage. Thank you so much for your time.

Transcript

  • 1. Safe Space Kent State University Welcome, Please begin your pre-training survey.
  • 2. Training Overview Learning Outcomes Introductions Stars Activity Vocabulary Break Panel Why be an Ally? Allyship at KSU
  • 3. Learning Outcomes Participants will Gain insight into the lives of LGBTQ identified people. Increase knowledge about history, phobias, myths, stereotypes, and heterosexism as it relates to the LGBTQ community. Be equipped with tools for being Allies and creating Safe Spaces for LGBTQ people.
  • 4. Ground Rules  No Sole Possessor of Knowledge  Take risks  Make mistakes  Respect others’ feelings, confidentiality, and opinions  Cell phones off  Ouch Rule  Other ideas?
  • 5. Introductions Name Department Why you want to be an Ally
  • 6. Coming Out Stars
  • 7. Sexual Identities Asexual Spectrum Asexual Demisexual Grey Asexual (GreyAce)
  • 8. http://asexual-not-a-sexual.tumblr.com
  • 9. Common difficulties For Asexual Persons     Rejection by partner or potential partners Confusion from parents and other loved ones Self loathing Desire to “fix” sexuality  Promiscuity  Drug/Alcohol abuse  Self Harm/Suicide  Stereotypes  Frigid , “need to find the right person, “it’s a phase”, mental illness, etc…
  • 10. Sexual Identities Single Gender Attraction Gay - Same Gender Loving (SGL) Man who has sex with men (MSM) Lesbian - Same Gender Loving (SGL) Heterosexual
  • 11. Sexual Identities Multi-Gender Attraction Nonmonosexual Bisexual Pansexual/Omnisexual Polyamorous…sometimes
  • 12. Difficulties for Sexual Minorities           Fear of rejection by society Fear of rejection by religion or of “going to hell” Rejection from family and other loved ones Loss of financial support and/or housing Fear of abuse, threats, or violence Loss of colleagues or employment Lack of positive openly gay role models Feelings of loneliness or solitude: “I'm the only one” or that their orientation is “only a phase” Getting physical needs met through anonymous sexual encounters Denial or lack of awareness of sexual orientation            Increased use of drugs and / or alcohol Avoidance of emotional intimacy with a significant other, friends, or family Withdrawal from friends, family, or other significant relationships Sexual aversion Overemphasis of masculinity or femininity to prove that they are not LGBTQ Contempt for people who might appear to be stereotypically LGBTQ (regardless of their actual identity) Contempt for “out” gay people Internalized homophobia Depression Anger Increased risk of self harm or suicide
  • 13. Sex Male Female Intersex
  • 14. Difficulties for Intersex Persons                 Fear of losing close friends Lack of positive Intersex role models Lack of access to positive images of Intersex issues Feelings of loneliness or solitude: “I'm the only one” Increased use of drugs and / or alcohol Avoidance of emotional intimacy with a significant other, friends, or family Sexual aversion Overemphasis of masculinity or femininity to prove that they are not LGBTQ Depression Increased risk of self harm or suicide Confusion about the relationship between sex and gender. Ignorance of intersex conditions from the general community and the LGB community Feelings of betrayal if family member hid the condition Feelings of betrayal if family members decided gender, and it is not congruent with identity Lack of intersex knowledgeable health care Fear of having genitals viewed by an intimate partner
  • 15. Gender Identities Binary Genders Cisgender Cisgender Man Cisgender Woman Transgender Transexual Male to Female (MTF/TransWoman) Female to Male (FTM/TransMan)
  • 16. Gender Identities Transgender NonBinary Genders GenderQueer/ThirdGender Gender Fluid Gender Neutral Two-Spirit
  • 17. Gender Identities Transgender Outliers Cross Dresser Drag King/Drag Queen
  • 18. Gender Expression  Masculine  Feminine  Androgynous  Fluid
  • 19. Gender Neutral Pronouns
  • 20. Difficulties for Trans* Persons Lack of access to restrooms, locker rooms, and other gender specific facilities. Lack of transgender friendly/knowledgeable medical care Lack of insurance coverage for transitioning costs Ignorance of transgender issues from the general community and the LGB community The under use of gender neutral pronouns Birth name, rather than chosen name on official documents. Confusion surrounding the gender binary system. Overwhelming pressure to “pass” as a binary gender. Fear of rejection by society Fear of rejection by religion or of “going to hell” Fear of losing family or other important relationships Fear of losing financial support and/or housing
  • 21. Difficulties for Trans* Persons Fear of “starting over” Fear of abuse, threats, or violence Fear of losing close friends and colleagues or employment Lack of positive openly gay role models Lack of access to positive images of LGB issues Feelings of loneliness or solitude: “I'm the only one” or that their orientation is “only a phase” Getting physical needs met through anonymous sexual encounters Increased use of drugs and / or alcohol Avoidance of emotional intimacy with a significant other, friends, or family Withdrawal from friends, family, or other significant relationships Sexual aversion Depression Weight gain or loss Increased risk of self harm or suicide
  • 22. Break
  • 23. Panel
  • 24. Team Work
  • 25. Case 1 Cassie is a sophomore at KSU who has only recently come to terms with her identity as a lesbian. She has a few friends on campus that she has come out to, but she is not very involved on campus. Cassie explains that after coming out to her parents recently, she has been kicked out of the house. She has been sleeping in her car and makes it clear that her parents have let her know that she is not welcome at home. Cassie has come to you for help. How would you help her? What other offices might you include to help support her?
  • 26. Case 2 Sam identifies as an MTF transgender person. In one of hir classes, they are watching a film with transgender themes. In the discussion of the film, many classmates make transphobic remarks and use slurs like “tranny” and freak. Sam is not out to hir classmates and lets you know that ze does not feel safe in hir class and worries how classmates will react if they find out that ze is trans. Sam has come to you for help. What do you do to help Sam? What other offices might you include to help support hir?
  • 27. Case 3 Katy comes to you and tells you that she thinks she is a lesbian. She has not told anyone else yet, but trusted you enough to talk to you about it. What are the issues in play? What can you do to assister her? What campus resources are available for her?
  • 28. Case 4 Jessica identifies as a bisexual woman and lives on campus. Over the weekend, she overhears other women from her floor talking about her. They are perpetuating bi-stereotypes and refer to her as “greedy” and as a “whore.” Jessica’s roommate is the only person that she is out to on campus. Jessica has come to you for help. What do you do to help her? What other offices might you include to help support her?
  • 29. Action The Basics  Be mindful of language  Gender neutral pronouns  Gender nonspecifics= partner vs. boyfriend/girlfriend  Don’t assume or attempt to guess someone’s sexual orientation or gender identity
  • 30. Action Support and get involved in LGBTQ causes and organizations on campus. Respect other peoples’ gender expression, Speak out when you hear others making homophobic/heterosexist/transphobic comments or jokes. Know the LGBTQ resources on campus. Continue to educate yourself.
  • 31. • • Coming Out Discussion Groups • • Welcome Reception, Queer Community Dinners, and Spring Kick off Party Educational Programs • • • • Pamphlets, Sex Education, Condoms, Dental Dams, Lubricant Counseling/Health Referrals Social Programs • • Sons of the Spectrum, Womyn Loving Womyn, Queer People of Color., and Trans*Formers Safe Sex • • • Resources Queering History and Safe Space for Students Safe Space Training Queer Voices Art Show Lavender Graduation Ceremonies
  • 32. Safe Space Logo
  • 33. The Pledge